5 Reasons to Make Friends with Your Saw Shop - Router Forums

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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
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Default 5 Reasons to Make Friends with Your Saw Shop



If you’re like many people, you probably think of saw blades as being something you just replace when they start to go dull or wear out. When your equipment isn’t cutting as well as it used to, it’s easy to buy a new blade and either toss or recycle the old one. After all, blades are cheap enough, right?

If you really want to get the most out of your circular saws and other equipment, though, you might want to rethink your stance on this. Instead of buying cheap blades and replacing them when they start to dull, consider finding a local saw shop and having your blades sharpened instead. If you’re not sure why you’d want to do that, here are a few things to think about.

Quality Counts

You’ve almost certainly heard that you get what you pay for – that’s just as true with saw blades as it is with anything else. You can get blades relatively cheaply, but you may be sacrificing quality for that lower price. Higher-priced (and higher quality) blades are often made with more precision, have a better edge and will hold that edge longer than the cheap blades off the rack. This gives you better cuts with less splintering for a longer period.

A Matter of Economics

Having higher-quality blades sharpened when they start to dull may even save you money down the road. Sharpening extends the life of the blade, so the initial cost of the blade plus the cost of having it sharpened a few times could end up being less than you’d pay to replace cheaper blades over the same period. The cheap blades lose their edge faster and you must pay the full blade price every time, so the cost of your cheap option can add up quickly.

More Than Just Blade Sharpening

One great thing about saw shops is that they do more than just sharpen saw blades. If you have a saw or other piece of equipment that’s experiencing problems, your saw shop may be able to repair it for you. This will keep your equipment running longer, delaying replacement costs and ensuring that you won’t be out a needed tool during your next woodworking project.

Valuable Recommendations

The people who work at saw shops know blades and tools inside and out. This makes them an invaluable source of information when you have questions about tools, parts and even projects. Once you’re familiar with the people working at your local saw shop and they’re familiar with you, you’ll likely be able to ask all sorts of questions when you stop in. Whether you ask for a recommendation between different tools or which type of blade to use with different woods, you’ll get opinions from people who really know what they’re talking about.

Networking Opportunities

You’re not the only one who visits the saw shop – many other patrons probably have the same interests as you. This sets up some great networking opportunities when you strike up conversations with other customers who’ve stopped by the shop. This could help you to find places to sell your work, give you new perspectives on your projects and may even provide you with fellow woodworkers who are interested in tools or equipment you no longer need or use. Knowing others in your area with an interest in woodworking can open a lot of doors, even if it’s just to learn another way to build a better door.

While you probably enjoy the time spent in your own shop, you may just find a whole world of woodworking knowledge, skills and experiences at your local saw shop – along with those expertly sharpened blades.

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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 09:01 PM
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Great points . I guess a person could add that a dull blade could be considered a safety concern also , as material may be more prone to kick back

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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-17-2016, 11:12 AM
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I have been having my router bits and table saw blades sharpened this past year. The place I go is principally for industry shops with pallets of blades arriving daily. The table saw blade sharpening is done on a Vollmer(?) Robotic CNC station. Sharpening is from $8 to $18 depending on number of teeth for 10" blades. Blades sound quieter after sharpening and cut awesome.

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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-19-2016, 08:55 AM
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WOW, Steve I'm a cabinet maker and I've been paying $30.00 a blade to get my blades sharpened through my local cabinet maker supply shop. I'd be thrilled if I could find a good saw blade sharpener that would sharpen a blade for the prices your quoting. Seems here in San Diego there aren't any local sharpeners so everything's being sent to La.
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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-19-2016, 11:38 AM
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Danny at $30 the blade would have to be as sharp as brand new.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-20-2016, 01:15 PM
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saw sharpening shops are getting to be harder and harder to find. in our disposable society most folk are to either to busy or lazy or stupid or cheap to bother. sharpening cheap blades, well, do I need to elaborate ?
keep one thing in mind, if you don't support local sharpening shops then your future option just might be either ship out (like with forrest blades) or pissing away more money at retail. I can appreciate the shops need to keep the lights on but some are hoping to send their kids to college on you ; like everything, shop around.
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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:05 PM
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Just by looking at the picture who ever wrote this thread wasn't a woodworker. The most important thing is to use the right blade for the right task and the picture shows a crosscut blade on a table saw ripping a board. Even shows the burn marks from a blade that has too many teeth making a rip cut.
And to top it off the article doesn't even mention that the blade has to match the cut.

Just shaking my head every time I sign on and see that picture.
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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:43 PM
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Good point Herb. I ruined a blade like that before I took the time to learn about the right blade for the right application. I do have a tendency to get lazy about changing blades sometimes but I leave my rip blade on to do multi tasking with the TS, not one of my finish blades or crosscut blades. I also keep some blades that are too crappy for nice jobs and switch to them if I have to cut something that's questionable (as in dirt, grit, or hidden metal).
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:32 PM
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but I leave my rip blade on to do multi tasking with the TS, not one of my finish blades

I hope you mean a combination blade, I do too. One time I left a straight rip blade on to do a quick crosscut and it grabbed my piece with a BANG and scared the dickens out of me,destroyed the wooden piece. The blade was one of those 24 big teeth with the long gullets.

I have Some generic combos I use for the junk cuts,mostly crosscuts, like cutting up scraps for fire wood.
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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 09:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveMI View Post
I have been having my router bits and table saw blades sharpened this past year. The place I go is principally for industry shops with pallets of blades arriving daily. The table saw blade sharpening is done on a Vollmer(?) Robotic CNC station. Sharpening is from $8 to $18 depending on number of teeth for 10" blades. Blades sound quieter after sharpening and cut awesome.

Steve.
I get excellent service out of a local sharpener and boy do they work well when they come back.
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