Juice groove in curved cutting board - Router Forums

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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-13-2016, 11:06 PM Thread Starter
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Default Juice groove in curved cutting board

Hi folks. First time here. I've searched using what I can think of, but not finding any easy answers. I'm making a cutting board with a curved detail edge and I want to route a juice groove to follow the edge. See the attached photo of the template I'll use to make each corner of the board with a flush trim bit at the table. On the template, I drew in (rather badly) the rough outline of the groove.

Any thoughts on the best way to route the groove? A standard edge guide won't navigate the tight corners on the curves.

Thanks for any advice!
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-13-2016, 11:41 PM
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Hi Dean and welcome. That is not a table mounted router job. It's a job for a plunge router. It would be easy to make a duplicate of the cutting board the way you describe with a flush trim bit but not the juice groove. You need to make a template to follow with either a guide bushing and round nose bit or template and round nose bit with matching diameter bearing that fits on the router bit's shaft. I think I've seen a few round nose bits with bearing but usually you would have to buy the bit and bearing separate. That would pretty much limit you to a 1/2 inch round nose bit with 1/4" shaft as the minimum size.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 06:55 AM
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That Charles is so smart.
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 07:32 AM
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make a jig. I am not sure if this method will work on the scalloped edge. Make a plywood template of the pattern. Make a second template using the first template and a rabbet bit. This will produce a 2nd template that is concentric to the first but 3/8" smaller from the edge. Do it again using the 2nd and the 3rd will be 3/4" inside. The difference can be reduced by using a larger bearing. (i.e. if you want 5/8" difference use a larger bearing and get a 5/16" rabbet X 2 = 5/8" difference ) You want the difference to equal a router bushing. Use 3rd template on the first template with a pattern/template bit to rout out the interior of the first template. mount first and third templates to the work and with a bushing and cut the groove.
I hope this was clearer than mud. It is how I made the templates I used for my cutting board http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fix...ing-board.html

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 08:15 AM
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very simply as Paduke as explained. One suggestion is to use an extended route base, this will help keep the router stable when making the outside corner cuts.
good luck
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 08:21 AM Thread Starter
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Some great ideas, guys - thanks! I was initially thinking about this by making/buying a edge guide for my plunge router with a point, or a bearing to ride along the scalloped (that's the right word!) edge. I saw that Bosch makes a roller bearing guide for the trim router. I've also seen what appear to be guides for Dremmels for banding applications. But, I think I'd rather use my larger plunge router for this job. It also seems like it might be a bit hard to control using this method. Anyone have any experience with these types of edge guides?

That aside - I think you guys are right - a template and a bearing bit or bushing is the way to go. My template in the photo is a quarter of the final board, but I think I'll make a full size template and then try Bill's method by also making a smaller template so I have a controllable slot for the bushing to ride in.

Thanks again for the ideas!
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 10:51 AM
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Hey, Dean; welcome!
"My template in the photo is a quarter of the final board,..."
-Dean

Whew! I was wondering where the juice was supposed to end up(?).
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 11:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Cruse View Post
Some great ideas, guys - thanks! I was initially thinking about this by making/buying a edge guide for my plunge router with a point, or a bearing to ride along the scalloped (that's the right word!) edge. I saw that Bosch makes a roller bearing guide for the trim router. I've also seen what appear to be guides for Dremmels for banding applications. But, I think I'd rather use my larger plunge router for this job. It also seems like it might be a bit hard to control using this method. Anyone have any experience with these types of edge guides?

That aside - I think you guys are right - a template and a bearing bit or bushing is the way to go. My template in the photo is a quarter of the final board, but I think I'll make a full size template and then try Bill's method by also making a smaller template so I have a controllable slot for the bushing to ride in.

Thanks again for the ideas!
I thought about suggesting the roller guide Dean but there are several issues to overcome. 1-you have to be able to stay 90* to the edge your are guiding from. 2- you have to be able to keep the router flat while you are working and 3- you have to plunge down to start while doing all this. It's not impossible but it would take some practice to see if you can because it's a lot do all at the same time.

There is an easy way to make a template that will be so close that it isn't likely anyone would be able to tell it's not perfect. Based on the same idea as using the roller make a marking jig of a stick with one hole drilled for a pencil and another for a dowel that will stick down and follow the cutting board. Stick some paper down on the board and follow the edge with the marking jig staying as close as you can to perpendicular.

I did the math on this once and you have to be off perpendicular by about 10* or more before it starts to make much of a difference in the distance from dowel to pencil. You can see if you're off before you get to 10*.

I would recommend using a guide bushing over a bearing guided bit personally. The bearing equipped bit will work but you need a much thicker template because you have to make sure the bearing is in contact with the template before it touches down on the cutting board.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 07:57 PM
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Welcome to the forum Dean.

Ross,
Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia


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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 11-21-2016, 08:27 AM Thread Starter
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Turned our nice, folks. Thanks for the ideas. Now just a bit more sanding (man, that cherry can burn!) and ready for the finish.
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