Craftex Sliding Table Saw Attachment CX200S - Router Forums

 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-18-2012, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
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Default Craftex Sliding Table Saw Attachment CX200S

I purchased the Craftex CX200S sliding table saw attachment from Busy Bee Tools ($599.00) because I was having difficulty manipulating large cabinet pieces on my Rigid TS3660 table saw. Breaking down sheet goods with a skill saw is fine for rough cuts but I find it difficult to precise cuts that way. I considered a track saw, but now that I have the sliding table I think this is a much better investment.
The sliding table came well packed in a heavy corrugated shipping container. Assembly was straight forward, the instructions were a bit too brief but reasonably clear. If your table has an extension piece you will need to remove it. You may also need to modify the fence rails by either cutting them or moving them down further along the table as I was able to do with mine. I also had to relocate the on/off switch.
The sliding table comes predrilled to fit a Craftex cabinet saw, so chances are you will have to drill it or your saw table to attach it. I chose to drill the sliding table to match the predrilled/tapped holes in my table saw. I used the extension table piece I had to remove as a template for the holes but I did have to drill the holes slightly oversize to allow for some adjustment when leveling the attachment. You must level the attachment with your saw table top and square the miter slots to the blade. I made sure everything was square to my original table top first, then squared the attachment. To achieve proper square I needed to add a strip of masking tape between the original table and attachment to shim it at one end. The legs on the sliding table allow for quite a bit of adjustment, extending up to 3 inches.
The two handles on the miter gauge fence seemed a bit cumbersome at first. But I found that if I only used one it was hard to keep the fence square to the blade. With both of them locked down it was no issue. It can be a bit tedious putting the miter gauge on and taking it off when you have to line up both the handles but I have found for many cuts I can simply slide the whole table with the miter gauge on back out of the way. For ripping wider stock the sliding table adds extra support when locked in place.
The fence stop is handy for repeat measurements. There is a pointer attached to the fence extension and an adjustable rule on top of the fence. I have found no suitable use for either of them. The rule might be all right for rough cuts but it is difficult to set precisely with only one knob to tighten it. It tends to move as you tighten it. The fence is cut at an angle close to the blade to suit LEFT tilt saws. The miter slots in the fence and the table attachment will allow for auxiliary fences, clamps and hold downs which can be helpful when cutting large pieces. But it is smooth aluminum and you might want to add a strip of sand paper for grip. The small extension table adds extra support for longer pieces but can be easily removed, which is necessary in my shop where space is precious.
Using the sliding table is a dream! Linear bearings and machined aluminum surfaces provide smooth travel. Even at full extension the table supports stock well and pushes it evenly through the blade. With a good out feed setup you can easily crosscut 48" wide material. I would have no issue cutting a 4x8 3/4" sheet in half with this setup. I have cross cut a 28x74" long piece from a 28X96" sheet of 3/4" MDF without a problem. Exact dimensions every time. For me it saves a lot of time and the number of times I have to manipulate large sheets. Much less effort and a lot less nail biting! You can see some of the cabinet parts I have cut below.
But now even when cross cutting smaller pieces, instead of reaching for my old miter gauge I find myself using the sliding table. It's just so EASY it's a pleasure to use.
You could probably add this accessory to any saw with a 27" table. It has a hefty price tag, but if you work with a lot of large sheet goods it's well worth the investment. I give it a 8.5 out of 10. The useless rules and pointer, and the too brief assembly instructions (I used the Grizzly instructions) are the only downfalls.
Grizzly Industrial sells one that looks exactly the same and in the same price range for you non-Canucks .
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EGO postulo , EGO venalicium , EGO incidere.
I measured, I marked, I cut.
Latin instructions for firewood.

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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 09:20 AM
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Deb, That is very nice and your report was amazingly well presented. If I was giving you a grade you would get an A+. The idea for this sort of thing dates back over 90 years.
Here's a true story to help you further appreciate what you have here: My Father-in-Law gave me an amazing piece of equipment a few years back when he retired from making church furniture and sold the business. The machine was known as the "Model Year 1920 YATES Pattern-Making Saw". He recommended that I put it to use when working on my line of concrete forms. I had no idea what to expect this tool to be and had previously never even heard of a Pattern-Making Saw. I asked if it would fit in my pickup truck. He laughed and said "Maybe - but your truck cannot handle the weight". He urged that I send two guys from my shop in a large delivery truck. I did as he requested. After their arrival to his shop, those guys called me and said, "Are you sure you want this saw to go on this truck?" I said, "Of course you dummies - why else would I have sent you 50 miles up the road?"

About 3 hours later, the truck returned and it was almost dragging in our driveway. Our forklift would not lift the huge saw off of the truck at our loading dock. We had to locate a larger forklift to unload the truck. That machine was gigantic in terms of weight. It was seven feet long (width to operator), it was four feet long (depth to operator) and stood about 32 inches tall. It was cast iron and nothing was made from thin material. It had an 11 horsepower electric motor that runs on 3- phase 220V. The motor alone would take four strong men to simply lift. As an operator would stand to use the machine, the worksurface was divided about 40% on the left and 60% on the right of the blade. Each section worked independantly, with the left side being for bevel cuts and/or miter cuts and the right side was the sliding part. Bevel cuts are made by tilting the left side of the tabletop - and it took all of my strength to simply tilt the table. The blade was 18" diameter, with a 1.125" arbor and was in need of sharpening. Both sections of the worksurface were grooved for a miter gauge. With this thing in running condition, it would easily make trim work of railroad crossties! For crosscutting and ripping this saw used the moving bed on the right and there were internally threaded 0.75" diameter holes spaced about 8" apart for clamping items to be affixed. The sliding side rolled along literally railroad tracks and the slide was almost effortless and passed the "nickel test" perfectly - right off the truck!

Unfortunately, we never ran the saw, as our OSHA inspector said it was unsafe. Back in those days - there were no protection measures built-into the saw (such as we so often see on modern equipment). Bottom line: Be very thankful for what you have, as it is about 3.5 tons lighter than the 1920 YATES!

That saw now resides in a Museum of Old Machinery near Augusta, Georgia.

Going-over this brought back some really cool old memories for me! Thank You,

OPG3

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 09:50 AM Thread Starter
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Wow Otis that sounds like one heck of a saw! Certainly way too big for my little shop. :-) Great story, thanks for sharing it.

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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 10:45 AM
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Deb - you're right, it was extremely heavy! Sometimes we can more appreciate the attributes, materials and [lighter] weight of products (things that affect the price) when we look at what is properly referred to as: "prior art". We now live in a much more modern time and benefit greatly from innovations in things we work with. I still get a kick out of young guys complaining about their computers being "slow", heck; I remember when slide rules were "State of the Art". I like to try and minimize heavy lifting and doing chores that are cumbersome or accident-prone. There are numerous ways to achieve most chores in wood working, but we each work with the challenges presented to us and our available resources. I think you have made a very wise decision. I don't personally own the item you have recently purchased, but for your type of work it may be "just the ticket". I do work with a lot of sheet goods, but usually break-them-down with a circular saw running along a straightedge - but then my work only has to be dimensionally accurate, never attractive to look at. Cool thread!

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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-20-2012, 07:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OPG3 View Post
Here's a true story to help you further appreciate what you have here: My Father-in-Law gave me an amazing piece of equipment a few years back when he retired from making church furniture and sold the business. The machine was known as the "Model Year 1920 YATES Pattern-Making Saw". He recommended that I put it to use when working on my line of concrete forms. I had no idea what to expect this tool to be and had previously never even heard of a Pattern-Making Saw. I asked if it would fit in my pickup truck. He laughed and said "Maybe - but your truck cannot handle the weight". He urged that I send two guys from my shop in a large delivery truck. I did as he requested. After their arrival to his shop, those guys called me and said, "Are you sure you want this saw to go on this truck?" I said, "Of course you dummies - why else would I have sent you 50 miles up the road?"

About 3 hours later, the truck returned and it was almost dragging in our driveway. Our forklift would not lift the huge saw off of the truck at our loading dock. We had to locate a larger forklift to unload the truck. That machine was gigantic in terms of weight. It was seven feet long (width to operator), it was four feet long (depth to operator) and stood about 32 inches tall. It was cast iron and nothing was made from thin material. It had an 11 horsepower electric motor that runs on 3- phase 220V. The motor alone would take four strong men to simply lift. As an operator would stand to use the machine, the worksurface was divided about 40% on the left and 60% on the right of the blade. Each section worked independantly, with the left side being for bevel cuts and/or miter cuts and the right side was the sliding part. Bevel cuts are made by tilting the left side of the tabletop - and it took all of my strength to simply tilt the table. The blade was 18" diameter, with a 1.125" arbor and was in need of sharpening. Both sections of the worksurface were grooved for a miter gauge. With this thing in running condition, it would easily make trim work of railroad crossties! For crosscutting and ripping this saw used the moving bed on the right and there were internally threaded 0.75" diameter holes spaced about 8" apart for clamping items to be affixed. The sliding side rolled along literally railroad tracks and the slide was almost effortless and passed the "nickel test" perfectly - right off the truck!

Unfortunately, we never ran the saw, as our OSHA inspector said it was unsafe. Back in those days - there were no protection measures built-into the saw (such as we so often see on modern equipment). Bottom line: Be very thankful for what you have, as it is about 3.5 tons lighter than the 1920 YATES!

That saw now resides in a Museum of Old Machinery near Augusta, Georgia.

Going-over this brought back some really cool old memories for me! Thank You,
Do you have a photo of this weighty piece, think most of us want to see it.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-25-2012, 10:40 AM
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Yes - it is on Old Wood Working Machines' website, VintageMachinery.org | Welcome. Look for Yates 1920 Saw.

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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 07-02-2012, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by OPG3 View Post
Yes - it is on Old Wood Working Machines' website, VintageMachinery.org | Welcome. Look for Yates 1920 Saw.
Hi, find a lot on this adress: OWWM - Yates-American Machine Co., Inc. - Photo Index
But can't find out witch one, can you help.
Thanks
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