What was your very first GOOD tool? [Archive] - Router Forums

What was your very first GOOD tool?

Router Forums
11-03-2015, 09:33 AM
https://www.routerforums.com/members/router-forums-albums-featured-articles-picture4170-what-your-very-first-good-tool.jpg

What was your very first GOOD tool?

What did it allow you to make you couldn't make before?

sunnybob
11-03-2015, 09:34 AM
Still waiting......

schnewj
11-03-2015, 09:51 AM
Hey, they were all good tools, even the cheap ones. Every tool that I got allowed me to expand my abilities. If I have to pin it down, then I bought a small B&D router (used) for $10 that allowed me to do things that I wasn't able to do before.

I still have the router and it has been in my stable for somewhere around 45 years.

herrwood
11-03-2015, 10:41 AM
My 1st good tool was my brain. Unfortunately it is broken and does not work any more :crying:

Shadowrider
11-03-2015, 11:38 AM
Delta Unisaw. My old crapsman contractor saw (early '70s vintage) shook like a scared dog and it was pretty much impossible to make a cut with any accuracy at all. It was the thin sheet metal that attached the saw to the base, not anything specific to the saw itself. For framing a house it was fine, anything beyond that, forget about it.

Herb Stoops
11-03-2015, 12:07 PM
Delta Unisaw. My old crapsman contractor saw (early '70s vintage) shook like a scared dog and it was pretty much impossible to make a cut with any accuracy at all. It was the thin sheet metal that attached the saw to the base, not anything specific to the saw itself. For framing a house it was fine, anything beyond that, forget about it.

I respectfully disagree with that Scott, I bought my first 10" Craftsman from a 2nd hand store in 1956 and used it until 2012 when I replaced it in 2012 with another a 12" that I have now.

I mean used it too, I was a carpenter and a cabinet maker for 45 years and another 15 years as a retired woodworker in my shop. it did everything I asked of it.

As for the definition of the "good" tool, is that good as in quality? or "good" as in useful? or "good" as to aesthetics? or "good" as to bargain? So many goods out there.....hmmmmmmmm

Herb

RainMan 2.0
11-03-2015, 12:26 PM
I'd consider my Makita plunge router connected to my Craftsman circle jig the biggest improvement in my tools way back in the day .
I was amazed at how accurately I could make holes for sub woofers and ports , and never used a jigsaw after that . And the best part was I kept the plugs that were made after the hole was cut out which have me a perfect template to do an exact setup for that same woofer or port size in the future

Cricket
11-03-2015, 12:28 PM
As for the definition of the "good" tool, is that good as in quality? or "good" as in useful? or "good" as to aesthetics? or "good" as to bargain? So many goods out there.....hmmmmmmmm

Herb

You get to decide on what "good" means to you. :grin:

Cherryville Chuck
11-03-2015, 12:36 PM
My first table saw, a $500 Craftsman 10". Not exactly a finely crafted piece of equipment but it got the job done for about 20 years until I upgraded to a Unisaw which is a finely crafted tool. It still runs. I sold it a year ago to a young kid for $10. Without that saw I'm not sure I would have pursued woodworking.

DesertRatTom
11-03-2015, 01:03 PM
For me it was quality that marked the first really good tool. And that was definitely a table saw. First was a Delta 10 inch direct drive table saw, combined with a Wixey angle finder. Once I learned to set the blade, projects started to get much better. Gave it away to my son in law 3-4 years ago and replaced it with a Laguna Fusion 10 inch saw, which has more power and even greater accuracy. I'd have to add that discovering the woodworking section of YouTube was also a line of demarcation for me. Being able to watch someone with skills do something has made me more comfortable with taking on something new.

The changes adding new, good quality tools continues. For example, buying and learning to use hand planes has allowed me to add a touch of artfulness and finesse that was impossible before.

MT Stringer
11-03-2015, 01:59 PM
When I was a kid, the only place to buy tools we knew of was Sears.

Hammer, hand saw, circular saw was about all we had to work with.
But those tools built several buildings. Not exactly fine woodworking.

Yeah, I grew up in the sticks!

Stick486
11-03-2015, 03:32 PM
What was your very first GOOD tool?

What did it allow you to make you couldn't make before?

Estwing leather grip hammer circa summer '55/56 and a 5pc set of Williams timber chisels at the same time...
and every two weeks something was added... (that never stopped)
having my own meant I kept my grubby hands off of my father's....
still using them BTW....

Stick486
11-03-2015, 03:34 PM
https://www.routerforums.com/members/router-forums-albums-featured-articles-picture4170-what-your-very-first-good-tool.jpg



at least the guy in the picture is in his right mind...

4DThinker
11-03-2015, 05:08 PM
First good tool was the first tool I owned. A Skill handheld router which I still have a will still occasionally use. Bronze tail bushing that needs a drop of oil before each use, but it still will spin any quarter-inch shaft router bit I put in it.

4D

aganser
11-03-2015, 05:52 PM
I much appreciate my new 23 guage brad nailer along wih the compressor.

Shop guy
11-03-2015, 06:39 PM
It has been so long ago I can't remember. At first some used tools and some hand downs then I started to buy good brand new tools. When I buy something today it has to be what I consider to be the best for me. I don't buy power tools from HF although I do have some of their clamps.

furboo
11-03-2015, 07:23 PM
I ended up with far too few of my father's old tools (long story), but my favorites are the awl and putty knife. I remember using them as a kid and still use them a lot.

TinmanCarving
11-03-2015, 07:47 PM
I have to agree with all that have said table saw. I haven't been wood working very long but after the first cut on my new to me direct drive craftsman table saw I said to myself "I can do this!".
A good table saw blade holds a close second.
Rob

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

kp91
11-03-2015, 08:44 PM
Not necessarily "woodworking tools", but I remember the sense of pride I got from my first quality calipers and micrometer. I admit that I don't use them as much today because dials are so much easier to read than the old vernier scales, but they are proudly displayed in my shop.

DaninVan
11-04-2015, 01:13 AM
Too far back; can't remember.
I started reno-ing my mom's house back in '64, so I must have bought decent tools, even then. I remember my first builder's saw had a black plastic housing...Skil maybe?

sunnybob
11-04-2015, 04:12 AM
Still waiting......

To expand a bit on my comment....

I was always taught a bad worker always blames his tools, so thats my excuse and I'm sticking to it.:|

But also, a good worker can make good work with bad tools, so any work made is as good as the worker, even if he has had to overcome rubbish equipment to produce it.

Good tools merely make the job easier.

phillipdanbury
11-04-2015, 07:36 AM
My first good power tool was my Bosch 1617. My first good hand tool was a Sargent jointer plane.

rwl7532
11-04-2015, 07:48 AM
I first thought of my Triton router (2011 or so) but the realized it was the 30 gallon 5hp Sears air compressor I bought in 1989 for my glass etching.
Before I was using a too small compressor and a tank. It took a few minutes to get up to pressure over and over again.

Bodger96
11-04-2015, 07:56 AM
A Black & Decker 1/2 sheet dual action (Orbital or Inline) sander. Sanding has never been my favorite part of woodworking so this tool did not let me make thing that I could not before I bought it. What it did do for me was let me get the finishing done so I could make something else. I have since bought or made many tools that allow me to do things I could not. That sander allowed me sell more items so that I might purchase more tools and wood. I bought that sander in 1971 and it just died last year.

Regards Bob

Murtu01
11-04-2015, 08:14 AM
Looking at the 1st image, the chappy is using a Tape Measure for a left handed person. It made a great difference to me the day I bought one for a right handed person, my measurements were much more accurate.

mgmine
11-04-2015, 08:30 AM
Like others I up graded to a 3 hp Unisaw from a 1 hp Craftsman. The Craftsman was good and I still use it but the Unisaw is in a whole other class. The Craftsman was from the early 1970's and the Uni saw is from the early 80's. I would say that I would buy either saw today used over a new saw.

Garyk
11-04-2015, 11:08 AM
I love all of my power tools but they are useless without a good measuring device, so my 1st "good" tool would have to be my old faithful folding rule. In the shop environment I defer to a 24" steel rule or a tape measure. "If you can't size it you probably can't make it."

Herb Stoops
11-04-2015, 12:53 PM
Too far back; can't remember.
I started reno-ing my mom's house back in '64, so I must have bought decent tools, even then. I remember my first builder's saw had a black plastic housing...Skil maybe?

I think the Skils were red and silver, Black and Decker maybe?

Black Decker 2HP Corded Circular SAW 7 1 4" Blade NO 7358 Type 1 10 Amps | eBay (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Black-Decker-2HP-Corded-Circular-Saw-7-1-4-Blade-No-7358-Type-1-10-Amps/391306788872?_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%2 6asc%3D20140620075055%26meid%3D588e9c83ca074a32800 983984c08169d%26pid%3D100011%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D10%2 6sd%3D121714906247)

Cherryville Chuck
11-04-2015, 01:01 PM
I bought a Skil about fifteen years later than that that was labeled a Classic Edition that was black and gold. I bought a B&D befre that that was all silver. Both are still going.

163481
11-04-2015, 01:13 PM
My tools were acquired over a long period of time and the first batch could be characterized as "reasonable" or "useful." These included a circular saw, a jigsaw (that I just discarded in favor of a new Bosch), a power miter box and an old Craftsman flex-drive table saw. These allowed me to do "reasonable" and "useful" work.

My first "good" tool was actually several upgrades for the table saw that included a zero-clearance insert, an after-market fence, a carbide-tipped blade, a stacked dado set, an after-market miter gauge and an analog dial indicator for machine setups. These really upgraded my capabilities and allowed me to make really straight, square, repeatable and accurate cuts.

But maybe the "best" tool in my stable was my TV that allowed me to watch 20 years of Norm Abram. I learned a LOT from Norm...as I'm sure did many woodworkers.

neville9999
11-04-2015, 01:26 PM
My first very good tool was a Plumb Claw Hammer, it cost a lot as I was a first year apprentice at the time and I was not being paid that much, the hammer was not with me for that long as it fell down behind a installed cabinet and it could not be retrieved so I had to buy another one which I still have after decades of use it is still in use, Today I have been assembling the drawers for my Work Bench and this hammer was in use again, its funny how I have never forgotten the loss of the first one, over the years I have lost a few trools but the loss of that hammer did hurt. N

steve hyams
11-04-2015, 02:17 PM
Built a house in remote Alaska. Good means versatile and durable for my definition in that application. A sliding vise with rubber jaws Jaw Horse has been utilized for everything from being a sheet metal brake for roofing and soffits to holding 20 foot lengths of hemlock for edge routing . I also used it in supporting scaffolding in staircase sheet rock work. The Dewalt
Impact driver drill set have served yeoman style securing 20000 lbs of sheet rock the batteries are still taking a full charge in 30 minutes. I don't have a drill press on have hand drilled hole saws up to 3 inch with same. A Bosch contractors saw has been durable and reproducibly accurate enough for all my needs with the addition of some adjunct portable rollers. I found some dado blades that fit the throat and this has given me increased versatility with the finishing phases. I utilized a Milwaukee sawzall,Bandsaw for resawing over 2 lineal miles of hemlock. A dewalt planer has been exceedingly accurate and durable ( I have been very careful to prevent any damage to the spiral blades with shallow cuts). My wife reminded me what a great tool the Fein oscillating saw is as well particularly once I found universal adapters that allowed other companies blades. Fein is pretty proud of their blades and those are like utility knife blad s to my use - change them frequently. These were the tools that immediately came to mind. This being a router forum I guess the router that has been most versatile for me thus far has been a small Bosch that has plunge capability but as I am keeping with simple profiles for finished edges have only used by hand thus far. I am looking forward to building furnishings for the place and may end up building a router table for it or the larger porter cable unit that I have. Just my .02 worth.

steve hyams
11-04-2015, 02:31 PM
Built a house in remote Alaska. Good means versatile and durable for my definition in that application. A sliding vise with rubber jaws Jaw Horse has been utilized for everything from being a sheet metal brake for roofing and soffits to holding 20 foot lengths of hemlock for edge routing . I also used it in supporting scaffolding in staircase sheet rock work. The Dewalt
Impact driver drill set have served yeoman style securing 20000 lbs of sheet rock the batteries are still taking a full charge in 30 minutes. I don't have a drill press on have hand drilled hole saws up to 3 inch with same. A Bosch contractors saw has been durable and reproducibly accurate enough for all my needs with the addition of some adjunct portable rollers. I found some dado blades that fit the throat and this has given me increased versatility with the finishing phases. I utilized a Milwaukee sawzall,Bandsaw for resawing over 2 lineal miles of hemlock. A dewalt planer has been exceedingly accurate and durable ( I have been very careful to prevent any damage to the spiral blades with shallow cuts). My wife reminded me what a great tool the Fein oscillating saw is as well particularly once I found universal adapters that allowed other companies blades. Fein is pretty proud of their blades and those are like utility knife blad s to my use - change them frequently. These were the tools that immediately came to mind. This being a router forum I guess the router that has been most versatile for me thus far has been a small Bosch that has plunge capability but as I am keeping with simple profiles for finished edges have only used by hand thus far. I am looking forward to building furnishings for the place and may end up building a router table for it or the larger porter cable unit that I have. Just my .02 worth.

rrrun
11-04-2015, 03:18 PM
My first table saw was a Delta contractor's saw ... I put a perfectly sized cardboard box underneath it so I would have a dust collection system. The saw was too light, and moved if I tried to do anything but crosscuts. The blade guard got bent and began catching on every cut ... so it came off. My little finger almost followed, but I was very lucky, and am fine with 10 fingers nearly 10 years later.

Last cut I made on that saw, though.

The replacement was a Sears Craftsman 10" cabinet saw with Biesemeyer fence. The saw has done everything I've asked of it, and makes square cuts very, very well. First tool I ever spent $1,000 on. Since I'm now making $300 cutting boards on it 10 years later, I have to say it's the best upgrade my shop has seen.

Of course, next week I'm buying my first Festool....

Larkan
11-04-2015, 05:00 PM
My mitre saw would be the most expensive and best since then I've bought a portable table saw. And two beautiful planes from Terry Gordon in NSW. I've very limited space but am grateful for what I have. The planes are definitely great quality and using them is a real treat.

Quillman
11-04-2015, 08:25 PM
THIS, (http://patwarner.com/images/new_router_table1.jpg)allowed me to make this, (http://patwarner.com/images/dp_fence_pixpg1.jpg) ( a precision drill press fence) which in turn (for linear work), allows me to make all kinds of things I could only guess at.

DaninVan
11-04-2015, 08:35 PM
I think the Skils were red and silver, Black and Decker maybe?

Black Decker 2HP Corded Circular SAW 7 1 4" Blade NO 7358 Type 1 10 Amps | eBay (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Black-Decker-2HP-Corded-Circular-Saw-7-1-4-Blade-No-7358-Type-1-10-Amps/391306788872?_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%2 6asc%3D20140620075055%26meid%3D588e9c83ca074a32800 983984c08169d%26pid%3D100011%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D10%2 6sd%3D121714906247)

Too far back...memory has been archived. ;)

Stick486
11-04-2015, 09:02 PM
Too far back...memory has been archived. ;)

or encased in scar...

DaninVan
11-04-2015, 09:08 PM
Yeh, but I wasn't going to go there... ;)

Stick486
11-04-2015, 09:14 PM
Yeh, but I wasn't going to go there... ;)

where were you planing on not going???

firstmuller
11-04-2015, 09:32 PM
My first power tool was a skill drill that the chuck would come off and you could put a jig saw or rectangle sander head on. I took and shipping crate from work about 48" high by 20" by 20" and lowered the top to make a lower shelf and made a door out of one side cutting the door down to match the shelf. It sure wasn't nice but we used it for many years. My next project I did was built a 10" table saw from a kit and I still have it but don't use it much any more but did use it a few years ago when my son had my portable Sears portable table saw and had to rip a board down. I only have a 1/3 HP motor on it so have a very hard time cutting anything with the 10" blade but with a 7 1/2'' blade I can cut all day. With all the nice tools I now have, I still can't do anything like the things I see on ib here.
Allen

jw2170
11-04-2015, 09:33 PM
Probably, my GMC 10" bench top table saw....

or, my first router,

or, my first chisel set....

Shadowrider
11-04-2015, 10:34 PM
I respectfully disagree with that Scott, I bought my first 10" Craftsman from a 2nd hand store in 1956 and used it until 2012 when I replaced it in 2012 with another a 12" that I have now.

I mean used it too, I was a carpenter and a cabinet maker for 45 years and another 15 years as a retired woodworker in my shop. it did everything I asked of it.

As for the definition of the "good" tool, is that good as in quality? or "good" as in useful? or "good" as to aesthetics? or "good" as to bargain? So many goods out there.....hmmmmmmmm

Herb

I think the main difference is that your saw was made back when they made them good. Like I said the saw itself wasn't so bad, it was the base. I remember using it as a kid and it shook some, but maybe not like now. It's still around, I gave it to my BIL. Everything under the cast iron table was made from formed sheet metal. It wasn't cracked or split and all the bolts were there and tight, but the metal was like rubber. I guess fatigue got to it. My dad made many perfectly cut picture frames on it. No way that could happen now and nothing is really broken on it. He also had a 1/2 HP Craftsman router and a jigsaw from about the same time. The housings were solid aluminum or magnesium maybe and even polished a little bit. They were built like tanks for what they were and had many many hours of usage on them before needing any attention. Craftsman tools "back in the day" were tools meant to be used, that's for sure. I think they took a turn somewhere in the '70s and haven't really ever been the same.

Shadowrider
11-04-2015, 10:39 PM
Not necessarily "woodworking tools", but I remember the sense of pride I got from my first quality calipers and micrometer. I admit that I don't use them as much today because dials are so much easier to read than the old vernier scales, but they are proudly displayed in my shop.

Ain't nothing better than an older pair of Starrett vernier calipers is there? They just scream craftsmanship. Wish I had bought some but I always went dial or digital. I still have a pair of 12" Fowlers and an 8" metric pair of Mitutoyo verniers and while good they just don't compare.

tidyswoop
11-04-2015, 10:56 PM
Hi, I don't have a tool for myself but my husband does have one for our home. If I am right, we have here a "saw" which serves us our cutting tool.

DaninVan
11-05-2015, 01:50 AM
Now see, that there's why we love for new members to fill out something about themselves in their profile.
I (speaking for myself here) had no idea you were of the subtler gender... :)

schnewj
11-05-2015, 12:32 PM
now see, that there's why we love for new members to fill out something about themselves in their profile.
I (speaking for myself here) had no idea you were of the subtler gender... :)

+1

NickyP
11-05-2015, 02:09 PM
For me it was without question my Hitachi 12" compound sliding miter saw. I ordered it on Amazon a couple of years back before they started taxing their merchandise and got it for $299 delivered. I absolutely love this saw and use it darn near every day. I invested in a Forrest Chopmaster blade for it and would have to say that this was my very first GOOD tool.

Stick486
11-05-2015, 03:32 PM
now see, that there's why we love for new members to fill out something about themselves in their profile.
I (speaking for myself here) had no idea you were of the subtler gender... :)

+2....

DaninVan
11-05-2015, 03:54 PM
So then, in lieu of a First name it'll have to be Mrs. Tidyswoop? Sounds Dutch(?).
We're sort of gender neutral, but we are neighbourly .... :)

DaninVan
11-05-2015, 03:57 PM
For me it was without question my Hitachi 12" compound sliding miter saw. I ordered it on Amazon a couple of years back before they started taxing their merchandise and got it for $299 delivered. I absolutely love this saw and use it darn near every day. I invested in a Forrest Chopmaster blade for it and would have to say that this was my very first GOOD tool.

$300 for a 12" SCMS? Holy Hanna! What a score! A Bosch is over $800 up here.
And a Forrest to finish it off?! Life is good, eh?:grin:

RÖENTGEEP
11-06-2015, 01:24 PM
Well, after thinking much time, I dont remember, but the first tools should be a hammer, screwdrivers and pliers, from then a lot of tools, power tools, mechanic tools, etc, etc.

As Mike mentioned, when I was a kid and till now, here in my country the Sears stores had the main source for tools, thats the reason because I have many Craftsman tools and power tools, I had to mention that had worked fine for me (Im not a woodworker for living, just all for hobby) and not regret anything. I recognize (spl?) that there are other brands, mostly american that are superior in quality, the words "made in USA" means a lot for me.

In Mexico there are the GRUPO URREA, that have very good tools (Urrea Historia ..:: Solución Total en Herramientas y CerrajerÃ*a ::.. (http://www.urrea.com/home/historia.php) ) and they are proudly "MADE IN MEXICO", but till now I only had bought some manual tools, because my old Craftsman has been working well, but if you see the catalog there are a HD band saw that I like a lot (wll in my wish list). :wink:

And finally the word "MADE IN CHINA" scars me :surprise:

nkawtg
11-06-2015, 02:26 PM
My Bosch 1617 EVS
The speed control and soft start make this a real pleasure to use.

papasombre
11-08-2015, 02:21 PM
Hi.
My first "serious" tool was a 3/8 inches Craftsman reversible drill. I bought it at Sears & Roebuck when the store was in my country. With it I did not ask for a drill anymore to my friends to make holes in the wood. I still have it, along with 15 others

kimotee
11-17-2015, 02:52 PM
Black & Decker Pro SawCat 7 1/4" circular saw. Bought it early-on, post-college, shortly after I had bought, and abandoned a Craftsman to work on a jobsite as a framer. That was in the 1970's. It is still with me today, even though I've gone on thru several careers in the Marine Corps, as a developer, and public official. As a retiree I'm finishing up my second whole house remodel, now in my early 70's, and the SawCat is still working just fine, now used primarily with a Bora wide track edge guide to breakdown plywood for cabinet boxes. The SawCat will probably still be around and going strong long after I am!

spzwd
11-17-2015, 03:23 PM
Same here, went from an early 70s craftsman (not bad) to a mid 80s Unisaw which was a whole 'nother world. Still in use in my cabinet shop today.

difalkner
11-17-2015, 04:17 PM
1976, a DeWALT 7770 Radial Arm saw - loved it! But, alas, in the early 90's I had no place for it and let a friend use it for his small business. The roof began to leak and he bailed. Unfortunately, neither he nor the building owner contacted me and the owner decided to have the building demolished. I found all this out too late to retrieve my saw. I still miss it but have no real place for one in my shop right now. I still look occasionally for good deals on a RAS but probably won't get one anytime soon. However, if I still had that RAS I would definitely make a place.

RainMan 2.0
11-17-2015, 04:19 PM
I was almost going to say my brain was my very first good tool , but it's broken :(

hatsomerden
11-17-2015, 04:30 PM
A De Walt radial arm saw which enabled me to make some new oak window frames for a listed house (built 1604).

flarimer
11-17-2015, 05:32 PM
A bench top drill press from a truck end sale. Cheap as it was, it was much more accurate than my hand drills. It also set a new confidence for accuracy in my shop.

old55
11-17-2015, 05:45 PM
Welcome to the forum Fred.

boxmaker3
11-17-2015, 09:56 PM
Back then Craftsman had black housings.

carrera4s
11-17-2015, 11:30 PM
My very first good tool was a coping saw. I was 11 years old and I could then cut small animals from a piece of pine which I then sold at school. (My previous attempt used a mini hacksaw, but could not do sharp curves). I bought a 1m x 0.3m piece of pine, cut a lot of animals and made 1500% return on the piece of pine. I still have that coping saw - 28 years later.

Roy Langman
11-18-2015, 12:43 AM
A Veritas DX60 low angle block plane.
It's just lovely to use, sits nicely in the hand, easy to sharpen & adjust, and truly is a great tool. Only problem is I use it for all sorts of jobs where I really should be reaching for a larger hand plane.

MYB
11-18-2015, 07:58 AM
When I was 8 years old I asked Santa for the kid's tool box in the Simpson Sears catalog. Most of the tolls were what you would expect except for the hammer which was a very small Stanley pean ball. I still use this hammer to this day. It the perfect size for many jobs.

Jerry Bowen
11-18-2015, 10:43 AM
This thread is especially interesting to me. I'll explain what I mean. The members that have followed my Threads and Posts from when I first showed up on the forum will recall how I tried to work at a level of accuracy that is not possible when working with wood.

What had happened is that I bought a bunch of old and well used tools from my wife's brother in law. He had picked these tools up at garage sales over the previous years. In my ignorance I had no idea of what I really good tool was but I did spend some time reading about tools online. The one that caught my attention was Incra's LS TS fence positioning system.

So, in regard to the question posed in this thread, that wonderful Incra tool would be the answer for me.

However, that tool set me up for what followed. I assumed that since the tool is capable of such precise accuracy that it was done so in order to achieve such accuracy while doing wood working projects. The key word in the above statement is "assumed", and this assumption and my attempt to achieve the assumption is what caused me to sound as I did and what invited the polite explanations from members that I was attempting the impossible due to the characteristics and/or properties of wood.

I'm writing this primarily to explain what caused me to talk about making cuts right down to the the thousandths of an inch and appearing to be as ignorant as I really was, (past tense) by the way.

I have come to the conclusion that the Incra LS TS tool's real value is two fold, at least for me, first, it's impressive to look at and to show off, but more importantly, it does allow quick set up for cuts when practical accuracy is required and of course when one needs to repeat a cut that was made earlier. The tool is of course capable of accuracy that much greater than the vast requirements of woodworking.

The Incra LS TS was indeed my first really "Good" tool. Fortunately for me, the motor on my first clunker TS burned out shortly after installing the Incra tool on it which led to my acquiring a new saw. Now, six years later and after spending several thousand dollars on "Good" tools, I now have a reasonable well equipped shop.

To some extent I suspect that my experience is not unique and many mambers will relate to the experience that I have described.

Perhaps this will explain how I got the reputation of trying to work to the degree of accuracy that I did. I do appreciate the valuable help that I received along the way from members of this forum.

Jerry

Cherryville Chuck
11-18-2015, 11:38 AM
My very first good tool was a coping saw. I was 11 years old and I could then cut small animals from a piece of pine which I then sold at school. (My previous attempt used a mini hacksaw, but could not do sharp curves). I bought a 1m x 0.3m piece of pine, cut a lot of animals and made 1500% return on the piece of pine. I still have that coping saw - 28 years later.

Welcome to the forum Carrera. That's a good story.

WR1944
11-19-2015, 12:02 AM
For me it is twofold. For power tools it was in 2005 when I started with a Festool TS55 saw in a CMS-table and all the trimmings. For the first time I could work accurate and felt I had full control over the handlings. And then there were more Festools ......
For hand tools it is the Worksharp 3000. I could really sharpen my chisels and plane blades. And I started to love to work with hand tools.

mnicholson1
11-20-2015, 09:59 AM
Craftsman Scroll Saw and Bosch Jigsaw

RÖENTGEEP
11-20-2015, 10:28 AM
I dont find where to start a new thread and I received this deal that I think is fine for those who are buying a new Router

e-Direct Special (http://www.ptreeusa.com/edirect_112015_triton.htm)





:wink:

Dejure
11-20-2015, 12:40 PM
When I struck out on my own, back around 72, I purchased things like the olive drab B&D drill and jig saw. They did the job, but, as they did, I knew them for what they were - garbage. I "upgraded" to Craftsman, but found them only marginally better. For example, the Craftsman jig scroll saw allowed me to turn the blade holder in different directions, so I could find new methods for, quickly, breaking blades and making bevel cuts [whether I wanted to or not].

After several more "upgrades," including spending over a hundred dollars for a so called pro grade scroll saw, with a touted ball bearing, which was really a round piece of bronze with a hole through it, I took the first real plunge into quality equipment. I spent $170.00 on a barrel jig saw from Bosch. After that, every replacement was because I wanted it, not because the tool died. In fact, my brother still has my first one, which is about thirty years old. It still cuts a 2x square enough you can avoid light between the cut and a machinist square. So there it is - a Bosch barrel scroll saw, bought around 85 or so.

OutoftheWoodwork
11-23-2015, 04:54 PM
My first GOOD tool, was my Excalibur Scroll Saw, which was a replacement of my Delta after my shop was broken into. All of my tools up until that point was either secondhand, or considered "lower end" on the tool scale, for the most part (or so they were rated, according to what I had read and seen, that is.)

curiousgeorge
11-23-2015, 05:04 PM
Mine was a Makita LS13 compound miter saw I purchased second hand from a pawn shop. In fact I still have and use it all the time.

Roefa
11-23-2015, 06:20 PM
For me, it was a Weller dual heat soldering gun that my grandmother gave me for my 7th birthday, 69 years ago. It's still going strong, and I use it frequently. Honorable mention goes to the B & D 1/4" drill of that same vintage that my Dad gave to me a couple of years later when he upgraded. I still have it... going strong... I have replaced a couple of the bronze bushings and greased the gears, and replaced the brushes twice. Someone mentioned Craftsman Contractor table saw... mine is about 42 years old and has
performed beautifully all those years. The only complaint is that the tilt is hard to crank.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE !
:)
Roger Memphis

Herb Stoops
12-02-2015, 12:33 PM
For me, it was a Weller dual heat soldering gun that my grandmother gave me for my 7th birthday, 69 years ago. It's still going strong, and I use it frequently. Honorable mention goes to the B & D 1/4" drill of that same vintage that my Dad gave to me a couple of years later when he upgraded. I still have it... going strong... I have replaced a couple of the bronze bushings and greased the gears, and replaced the brushes twice. Someone mentioned Craftsman Contractor table saw... mine is about 42 years old and has
performed beautifully all those years. The only complaint is that the tilt is hard to crank.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING, EVERYONE !
:)
Roger Memphis

Rodger, My old saw was like that on the tilt and several years ago,I turned it upside down,cleaned the threads on the tilt shaft. Also dry lubed the threads,and cleaned out the trunions and dry lubed them too.
I bought a couple of cast iron hand wheels from Grizzly, took them to a machine shop ,had them bored out and a set screw put in them,and installed one on the tilt and the other on the lift.
What a difference it made, like turning the handles on a milling machine, the fight was over, and I won.

Herb

Knothead47
12-02-2015, 02:41 PM
Been passing over this thread but I thought I would put in my 3 cents worth (everything is going up these days!). I inherited a Craftsman drill when my father-in-law passed away in 1972. I used it for years until the motor went down the tube after about 10 years. No telling how long he had it. I did buy another Craftsman in the mid 70s when I was in seminary in KY. Still use it along with a rechargeable Ryobi drill. BTW, the old drill had an all-metal housing. The newer one is plastic and metal.
Edit: He even had an adapter gizmo that you put the drill in and made a drill press. The drill and gizmo were made specifically for each other. The DP didn't fit any other drill I could find.

ttocsmij
12-03-2015, 01:29 AM
First Craftsman tool box with tools around age 9. Dad and I had to Fix Or Repair Daily every car we owned until I bought my first new car; a Honda Accord back in 1986. LOL

Oh! You probably meant woodworking tools. ^_^

Well, that would be a Craftsman Router back in the mid-1970's which I used to finish various edges of the home we were building, and stair sets for the front and rear decks (and later finish off the basement and build a little shelving for misc. places). Fifteen years later we would add a 16x20 extension and it came in handy when we learned that Anderson does NOT provide trim or casing for 2x6 construction with their casement windows, bay windows, or double french door sets!! Another new skill set learned and a great excuse to pick up a 12" DeWalt Mitre Saw and Workstation (stand). ^_^

ttocsmij
12-03-2015, 02:03 AM
... an antique Craftsman saw (inherited from my wife's grandfather in the mid-1980's). I added a contactor-based Stop-Start button system shortly after acquiring it. The only non-functional part I know of are the gears that raise / lower the blade. The pinion gear is broken so one has to turn the screw by hand (to do the up / down action). Parts became unavailable in 1947 so fixing them was out of my league. The saw was used shortly before we re-packed the garage in 2004 (when it became a horizontal surface :( ). I fired it up a couple years ago just make sure it still ran. I tried to run the Model No. when I first got it but it is so old Sears couldn't even find it. I did a little Internet surfing and think it is from the late 1930's or early 1094's. Our friends at Vintage Machinery have a message thread about a similar saw ( www dot vintagemachinery dot org slash photoindex slash detail.aspx?id=3705 ) and a manual for this model ( www dot vintagemachinery dot org slash pubs slash detail.aspx?id=1490 ). Sorry about the links (I don't have enough posts yet to include real links). Anyhow, I attached some photos for reference.

RJM60
12-03-2015, 06:55 PM
It was a hammer!

Stick486
12-03-2015, 08:25 PM
and it was a big hit...

mikelley
12-10-2015, 01:57 PM
and I think you hit the nail on the head, Stick..........(next?)

Stick486
12-10-2015, 02:41 PM
and I think you hit the nail on the head, Stick..........(next?)

which...

.
https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fthumbs.dreamstime.com%2Fx%2Fhammer-guy-351643.jpg&f=1

DaninVan
12-10-2015, 03:40 PM
Estwing 26oz, meet thumb... *$%$#@()*!!!*

DesertRatTom
12-11-2015, 02:11 AM
Looking over the string and realized that for me it was an Estwing 13 oz hammer I got somewhere in the 50s. I think I got if from the guy who took me out a couple of summers to help him with finish carpentry. Still have and use it all the time. It is easy to use, balance is wonderful, and I like that it shows its age gracefully. I have a couple of Wood River planes that I'm growing fond of these days as well. That and a perfectly tuned Stanley Sweetheart block plane. Learning that hand tools are often quicker than using a power tool.

DaninVan
12-11-2015, 03:08 PM
Curiously enough, my most hammer & finger injury wasn't from pounding nails, it was from pulling them. I was reefing down on the handle of my framing hammer and didn't notice that my left hand was under the arc of the handle, when the spike suddenly let go...
I thought I was going to upchuck.

DaninVan
12-11-2015, 03:10 PM
Insert 'painful' between "most" and "hammer" [edit]

Stick486
12-11-2015, 06:05 PM
Insert 'painful' between "most" and "hammer" [edit]

stacking material pinch...

Roefa
12-14-2015, 10:41 AM
Hi Herb Stoops -
What did you use for (dry) lube?
I have avoided anything that would attract and hold sawdust.
Thanks !
Roger Memphis
(Roefa)

Stick486
12-14-2015, 12:06 PM
Hi Herb Stoops -
What did you use for (dry) lube?
I have avoided anything that would attract and hold sawdust.
Thanks !
Roger Memphis
(Roefa)

I'm partial to TriFlow...

Roefa
12-21-2015, 01:17 PM
Thanks, Stick -
The manufacturer says "Tri-Flow® Superior Dry Lubricant is an elite formula created for dry and dusty conditions. The drip bottle application, with a convenient straw, allows for deep penetration in hard to reach moving parts. Featuring paraffin wax and high-grade petroleum oil to allow the lube to go on wet, but then set up in a dry, 'wax-like' film so it will not attract or absorb grit and grime. Perfect for dry, dirty, dusty conditions..." Seems like the wax would trap sawdust, but I'll give it a try. One of my friends also recommends B'laster (PTFE) lube .... may try that, too.
Keep Chewing - the restraints may be nutritious !
...and Merry Christmas !
Roger Memphis

ejgoerner
12-21-2015, 03:07 PM
when my dad left for California in 1994 he gave me all his craftmans hand power tools, a sander, drill,a 90 degree angels drill, a 7 1/4 inch saw , saber saw,a power planner,a wobble dado (never been used) a molding kit for a 10 inch saw. most are from the 80,s all made in the USA and all still work today.

DaninVan
12-21-2015, 04:29 PM
Erik; get rid of that wobble dado before you or someone else gets hurt. Trust me, voice of experience here!

schnewj
12-21-2015, 06:58 PM
erik; get rid of that wobble dado before you or someone else gets hurt. Trust me, voice of experience here!

+1

Stick486
12-21-2015, 07:13 PM
erik; get rid of that wobble dado before you or someone else gets hurt. Trust me, voice of experience here!

+2

RainMan 2.0
12-21-2015, 07:25 PM
Erik; get rid of that wobble dado before you or someone else gets hurt. Trust me, voice of experience here!

+3 . I threw mine in the garbage :(

Stick486
12-21-2015, 08:09 PM
+3 . I threw mine in the garbage :(

should have given it to somebody you really dislike...

RainMan 2.0
12-21-2015, 08:38 PM
should have given it to somebody you really dislike...

Yes and believe it or not the opportunity arose and of course I didn't have it :(

cocobolo1
12-31-2015, 11:32 PM
Way too many tools over the years to pick one.

But an interesting story when I was toiling for a high end yacht company. I needed a crank necked paring chisel. I had just seen a tiny ad in Harrowsmith magazine (1977) from Lee Valley tools. So I sent them a blank cheque and asked them to send me the widest one that they had...not even knowing if they had such a beast.

A short while later, the chisel arrived in a well padded envelope along with a hand written letter from Leonard Lee thanking me most sincerely for having enough trust in him to send a blank, signed cheque.

I still have that chisel. It was used back then to trim plugs used to cover screw heads.

JFPNCM
01-01-2016, 03:50 AM
Curiosity and the willingness to learn. Oops that's 2 tools. :yes2:

DesertRatTom
01-01-2016, 07:05 AM
Curiosity and the willingness to learn. Oops that's 2 tools. :yes2:

Well said. Trying out something beyond your present skill level always moves you forward, regardless of how well it turns out.

DaninVan
01-01-2016, 12:42 PM
I know I've said it in the past, but I've got you guys to thank for expanding my woodworking experience!!!

:x

Stick486
01-01-2016, 05:57 PM
I know I've said it in the past, but I've got you guys to thank for expanding my woodworking experience!!!

:x

you are no slouch in the help department either Dan...
thanks for for time and energy...

JFPNCM
01-02-2016, 12:47 PM
The members of this forum and the open and good natured manner in which they share their knowledge base is the best tool of all. Thank you one and all.

rwoods4764
01-21-2016, 05:40 PM
i have to disagree with scott i have a 72 Craftsman 12 in contractor saw that i have had 36 years that belong to my father in law who had bought it new in 1972 it still runs as good now as when it was new my father in law past in 1980 and i bought his woodworking shop from my mother in law so my first tool was the table saw the rest came later rwoods

DaninVan
01-21-2016, 05:47 PM
Hey, Ron; have I already welcomed you? No matter, I don't remember either... ;)
A lot of the members have had the earlier Craftsman woodworking equipment, and generally liked that older stuff. It's the newer machines/tools that have earned the serious criticism.
That and not being able to readily find parts.

Stick486
01-21-2016, 05:59 PM
Hey, Ron; have I already welcomed you? No matter, I don't remember either... ;)
A lot of the members have had the earlier Craftsman woodworking equipment, and generally liked that older stuff. It's the newer machines/tools that have earned the serious criticism.
That and not being able to readily find parts.

agreed.....

RainMan 2.0
01-21-2016, 07:08 PM
Hey, Ron; have I already welcomed you? No matter, I don't remember either... ;)
A lot of the members have had the earlier Craftsman woodworking equipment, and generally liked that older stuff. It's the newer machines/tools that have earned the serious criticism.
That and not being able to readily find parts.

Ron joined in 2010 , but neither of welcomed him and he's not a post hoe like us .(I hadn't joined yet )So a belated welcome to the forum Ron ;)

bryansong
01-22-2016, 09:16 AM
I'd say my first good tool was an S&K socket set.

The first woodworking item, and I don't remember who the manufacture was, a 10" Power Miter saw from Sam's Club.
It's one from before they had a cutout in the table for the blade and any time you cut an angle you'd eat up part of the table.

Bryan

DesertRatTom
01-22-2016, 11:28 AM
I get inspired from some of the posts here, then go make something. I like the generous sharing on here.