Do most of you CNC guys own a bandsaw? - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 31 (permalink) Old 08-23-2019, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Resawing anything much wider than a foot is going to leave you with slabs that want to warp.
Unless it's quarter sawn... that tends to stay very straight on wide pieces although I seldom resaw boards wider than 9". The widest I have resawn is that Sinker Mahogany board.

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post #22 of 31 (permalink) Old 08-23-2019, 11:43 PM
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A bit of a jump up , but there’s this one that does an 18” cut . I found a dealer in Calgary, so it’s only a 4 hour drive to get there
Nice price too. If I wanted something with an 18" cut, or even more, I would make either, a bandsaw mill, a bandsaw, or chainsaw mill. Then you could get pretty much any size cut you want - for a lot less money, and save on gas to boot.

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post #23 of 31 (permalink) Old 08-30-2019, 04:15 PM
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My first bandsaw was a 14" Rockwell/Delta. I used it for production cutting toys. It was not up to the task and had many failures due to poor design and going cheap. I had lots of different blades for it including a 3/4" resaw blade. Problem was the two piece cast iron frame ws not ridged enough and it would start to shutter when resawing near the 6" limit. I'm hard pressed to believe that putting a riser block on a 14" saw makes it into a resaw. I still have that old 14" but also have a 17" Minimax that has a steel frame and is capable of resawing 12". Ideally it should have a bigger motor but the 3/4" blade cuts fairly freely. There is an excellent video put on by Carter that shows most of what many people don't understand about using a band saw. Well worth the watch.
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post #24 of 31 (permalink) Old 08-30-2019, 04:19 PM
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I failed to answer the actual question! Yes, I think a bandsaw is a valuable piece of equipment for any shop. As long as I could look at one in person I'd have no problem buying used. They are simple to maintain. I have a production model CNC and it runs all day everyday. but the band saws still get some use.
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post #25 of 31 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 12:49 AM
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I started out with a Ridgid 14" and added a 6" riser. I used Timberwolf blades and it was ok but it would dance around the shop and would wear me out trying to resaw a 12" piece of oak. I finally upgraded to an SCM 16" with a 1" carbide tipped blade. The difference is night and day. The SCM is solid and cuts through oak, maple and mahogany like butter. There is a considerable difference in price from a 14" to this 220v 4HP monster. But I really like it and would not go backwards. I ordered the saw directly from SCM. I did order some 1/4" blades and a couple 3/8" blades for cutting curves and misc bandsaw work.

Many folks have the Laguna and Jet came out with a new saw but they do not hold a candle to the SCM. The SCM is a 30 AMP 220V receptacle so not everyone has that available in their shop.
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post #26 of 31 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 09:00 PM
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I went to look for SCM pricing because that would be a consideration for me. Couldn't get to a price, and the information on SCM's site was kind of lean. I assume the prices are premium.

When I visited the Laguna facility, they had a large number of their premium, Italian made saws on display, up to 36 inches, and I would be hard pressed to find anything better built. And you can get all kinds of information from them. I already have a Laguna 14-12 and really love it, and for someone with a 110 v only shop, I would be less inclined to go with the 220v machine. Lots of things to consider before spending big bucks.
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post #27 of 31 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 12:42 AM
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If you have not already bought you can contaxct Sam Blasco directly at SCM. Sam works out of Austin, TX but is a national rep.

[email protected]

Sam has a youtube channel and shows several SCM machines. My SCM was made in Italy and maybe by the same people that make the big Laguna.

After using the SCM I will never go back to tinker toy bandsaws.
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post #28 of 31 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 10:45 AM
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not arguing that the SCM is a wonderful saw. but, i will say that our 18" grizzly (used exclusively for re-sawing) went from night to day when we switched from timberwolf hss to lenox carbide blades. we use 1" wide 3 teeth/2".

yes, a bandsaw is very useful in the shop, but i suppose you could get by without it. you kind of need the other tools to make up for it... many different ways to do something in the shop.
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post #29 of 31 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 02:41 PM
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There is an episode of The Woodsmith Shop in which one of the people said he thought the most important power tool is the bandsaw.
@RainMan 2.0 , Rick, are you now clear on what resawing is?
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post #30 of 31 (permalink) Old 09-12-2019, 03:07 AM
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I teach furniture design to college students and my classes are held in a huge fabrication lab shared by an entire Architectural college. We have several bandsaws, as well as one large industrial CNC and 4 small CNCs. The small CNCs are dedicated to making furniture parts and joinery cuts. The bandsaws are used every day, often with students standing by waiting their turn. Related to CNC work a bandsaw gets used to free CNC cut parts from their tab-connected boards. Students often use the bandsaw with small parts where the table saw or miter saw would be intimidating. The disk or belt sander or drum sander usually follows to clean up the bandsaw-rough edges. I'll often encourage a student to cut out a complex part using a bandsaw rather than using the CNC, as considerable time is saved over creating a drawing/creating toolpaths/clamping down and zeroing the bit to the board/changing the bit/etc. to CNC the part.

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