CNC router went down , bad wire. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 12:48 PM Thread Starter
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Default CNC router went down , bad wire.

The CNC spindle shut down half way through the Eagle head job. I found that the power cable from control box to spindle was bad. I replaced the wire and was able to save the job. Today I examined the old wire to see what was damaged. First thing I found was a random copper strand sticking out of the insulation. This wire was connected to the blue wire. See first pic. Then I stripped back the insulation and found the blue wire damaged and the green wire severed. See second pic. I replaced this wire with a heavier gage wire. So I hope this doesn't happen again.

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 01:23 PM
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Hate that it happened but glad you found it. Good troubleshooting, Dan!

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 12:30 AM
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Should use high flex, shielded cable for spindle. Not cheap, but will last longer and prevent a lot of noise issues.

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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 01:07 AM
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Nice catch . Was the damage at a pinch point ?

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 06:44 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMan 2.0 View Post
Nice catch . Was the damage at a pinch point ?
The break was located on the X axis. Where the wire is constantly flexing during operation.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 07:36 AM
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What Richard said. Wire bending like that is always subject to wear. At least it was stranded wire which would last longer. But as mentioned there are better wires made for this type of work although they do cost more in the long run you have less downtime and less chance of grounding out possibly taking a control board with it.
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 11:48 AM
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it appears that they got crimped somehow, but i could be wrong. you may want to investigate the area where they were to see if there is any binding, pinch points, etc...

oops, just read rainmans response, sorry!
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-13-2020, 12:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreilly View Post
What Richard said. Wire bending like that is always subject to wear. At least it was stranded wire which would last longer. But as mentioned there are better wires made for this type of work although they do cost more in the long run you have less downtime and less chance of grounding out possibly taking a control board with it.
I don’t like the fact that the wires are tightly located in a jacket .
I added power windows to my 84 GMC ,used the factory internal door components, but built my own harness after seeing what GM was doing wrong .
They have all their wires taped tightly together , which causes them to bind each and every time they move .
So instead , I had my wires loosely sitting inside of wireloom , that way there was no binding , and I suspect I’d get a few million cycles before it would be an issue.
I did have a layer of tape around the wireloom to prevent the wires from coming out where the split is .

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 07-13-2020 at 12:17 PM.
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