DW625eK base plate - Page 2 - Router Forums
 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 08:23 AM
Honored Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: United States
First Name: pat
Posts: 1,053
 
Default

"Errmm….I don’t spose anyone has a drawing………do they?"
************************************************** **********
I would add, country of origin also plays a role with respect to the hole pattern and arbor center. Moreover, (& I have monitored this for many years), the manufacturing in a given plant is variable, despite being 100% CNC.
What I'm saying is, given an engineering/assembly dwg, there is no guarantee it will hold (even +/- .010") from sample to sample!
So if you want precision, work off of your personal sample, not the dwg.
Quillman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 11:58 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,207
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmicron View Post

I come from a precision engineering background where dimensions were always critical and I had the reputation of being the tightest of the tight when it came to tolerances (hence the nickname). Great for my previous life but not when working in wood!
Wood is not conducive to the kind of accuracy you are accustomed to. It changes dimension constantly because of humidity changes and there is nothing that can prevent that.

Quote:
....but I have never needed it because I have always worked between the fence and the bit.
This is a tremendously dangerous practice and should never be done. I've seen a video where Bill Hylton did it but he actually used 2 fences so that the wood was also trapped between the fences as well. There is the real possibility of the piece you are working on to get grabbed by the bit and get launched at near supersonic speeds. The same concerns apply to using a table saw fence as a stop for repetitive cuts.

Quote:
Hopefully you all now understand my dilemma, yes I may be OCD about my PCD’s but ...
We have seen this before with people who are accustomed to working in metal and the mental transition to what works with wood can be a difficult one (just ask Jerry Bowen). Your best bet is to machine in some adjustment and use a centering cone to manually get it to the best acceptable accuracy. I would also suggest you have a look at Quillman's website (Pat Warner) as he has to be more accurate with what he does than the rest of us need to be. My personal motto is "if it looks good then it is good".

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #13 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 12:13 PM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 4,429
 
Default

@mrmicron

I gather you will not find the documentation you are looking for...and I would assume, with your experience, you have already considered the alternatives.

The last base I made I started oversize, transferred the screw locations and drilled them for flat screws, then mounted the plate and found center. I then used that center to determine the actual concentric perimeter. I left it a bit bigger than the router base so I did not need to worry about the router frame getting in the way.

For another router I made a square base, same way, and I marked and use one of the edges all the time. I marked that base with the measurement from center to the edge for any mathematical needs...

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-07-2016, 04:33 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: New Zealand
First Name: John
Posts: 5
 
Default DW625eK base plate

I understand what you are saying Quillman but with all due respect, +/-0.010” is an order of tolerance that I would expect from someone using a pedestal drill. This is a total deviation of in excess of 1/2mm. A CNC machine should be easily capable of working to tolerances in the order of +/-0.0004" (+/-100 microns). Of course the tighter the tolerance the higher the cost due to higher quality machinery costs, more tool passes, more frequent tool tip changes, etc., and therefore as you say, it is possible that the tolerance gets backed off a bit. I would however still be bitterly disappointed in the quality of a product if I could beat it with a pointed setscrew and a pencil! Working off the drawing I have is as I said in my last post, simply not an option due to the lack of detail. I guess I was just hoping someone had a proper drawing to save some work.

Cherryville Chuck you stated that “This is a tremendously dangerous practice and should never be done.” Danger is a relative subject. I have seen a demonstration of what can happen when a work piece is fed into a router table from the trailing edge side of the bit. The demonstrator also fed it in by hand – BRAVE! I wonder if this was the same demonstration you mention as I seem to remember it was a routing celeb that did it. I have to say that with a bit of forethought, concentration, fingerboards and ALWAYS feeding into the leading edge of the cutter there seems to be little danger. I also tend to run my finger boards quite tight. Certainly I have never ever had a mishap by using this approach. Also I have both the bit rotation and feed direction etched onto the router base plate on my table so I do not even have to stop and think which is the safe(er) feed direction. Having said that I have never fallen off a ladder either but we are not allowed to use these anymore as they are now considered too dangerous.

I think that you Nick are right. I guess that I am just a bit disappointed as I expected to find a proliferation of such drawings on the web when I first searched and as seems to be the case with the web, you get sucked in to try just one more search! I have considered the alternatives and if I had access to a engineering lathe and a milling machine I would probably start from scratch and make a new (better) sole plate as well as the base plates and I would dowel the sole plate so different base plates could be fitted straight on without the need for centring cones etc., with a repeatability in the order +/-10 microns. Unfortunately I am now halfway around the world from that equipment. So I am going to do what I did last time, almost. First I will rough out the plate and mount it. Slightly oversize as you did. I will have to finish cut the round base plate using the router so I will use a point bit in the router after mounting it which will give me a centre for the trammel pivot point. I will then cut it to a perfect circle, remount it and bore out the centre. All I have to do then is add the counter bores for a guide bush set etc.. I haven’t figured this bit out yet but I am sure I will find a pretty accurate way to do it!

Quillman, just had a look at your sliding dovetail joints on this site. Ni…….ce work. You obviously are a man who understands accuracy and tolerance!
mrmicron is offline  
post #15 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-08-2016, 01:06 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,207
 
Default

John you are taking some steps to mitigate the risks of trapping the wood between the bit and fence but I have to ask why do need to do that? I don't find it necessary and I've been using a router for over 3 decades. As for the +/- 10 microns, that's the overkill we are talking about. The wood can move more than that in a day and that kind of accuracy in wood is not necessary.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #16 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-12-2016, 12:59 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: New Zealand
First Name: John
Posts: 5
 
Default DW625eK base plate

Charles, The reason I do it is simply because my router table fence is a simple alloy angle section. I do not have the luxury of a split fence that I can offset by an amount equal to the depth of cut when using the router for sizing purposes. It's one of those jobs that I have never managed to find time to do yet and the next time you need the router you just make do with what you have. But I am trying to negate these problems with my new table-if I can find the time to make that too. That's what I need - a machine for making round tuits!
mrmicron is offline  
post #17 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-12-2016, 10:53 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,207
 
Default

John this a link to a thread where I showed pictures of my latest home made fence. Cost $5-10 and took about 3-4 hrs to make. Complete with sliding fences and dust control that is 95% effective on edge cuts. http://www.routerforums.com/table-mo...ble-fence.html Pictures are in post #3.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #18 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-14-2016, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Country: New Zealand
First Name: John
Posts: 5
 
Default DW625eK base plate

Thank you for the link Charles. When you use your fence for planning/sizing ops do you shim up on one side to allow for the depth of the removed material? The movable fence I am contemplating has three M6x1 mounting points. The M6 bolts are free rotating in the moving fence and tapped through my existing alloy fence. The idea is to be able to set the depth of the fence by turning the three knobs on the back of the fixed fence with one full turn being equal to 1mm. the reason for three knobs being to be able to adjust perpendicularity to the table and parallelity to the adjacent movable fence.
mrmicron is offline  
post #19 of 28 (permalink) Old 06-14-2016, 11:45 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,207
 
Default

I have a jointer and a planer so I don't need to do those operations but some do and they shim the fence. Some just stick a strip of masking tape to a stationary fence also. I've read that plastic playing cards make excellent shims as the thickness from card to card is near perfect. They are long enough and wide enough so that you wouldn't need the screws and I would think that shims would be more accurate than turning screws. Lots of other things would tend to be very uniform as well such as sheet plastics, mdf, and high density pressed boards.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #20 of 28 (permalink) Old 02-16-2017, 01:39 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Country: United Kingdom
First Name: Dave
Posts: 2
 
Default

Hi MrMicron

I came across your thread when I was looking for the hole locations for a Dewalt 625 / Trend T11

The following link is to a PDF of the dimensions of the base for the T11

[ unfortunately the forum won't let me post the link as a new user ]

But search for "TREND BASE CONFIGURATION" and it should take you to the PDF


central mounting hole is 75mm above center
other two holes are 15mm below centerline and 57.5mm left and right of center



Hope this is of use

Regards

Dave
DaveH1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
longer base plate screws for Bosch 1617 Stefftech New Member Introductions 9 04-07-2015 07:02 PM
Triton MOF001 Base plate Issues. fleetinglyshort General Routing 6 10-24-2014 06:04 AM
Base Plate Help CanuckGal Portable Routing 47 05-16-2009 04:10 PM
choosing a base plate ... reikimaster Table-mounted Routing 5 01-13-2006 10:37 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome