To insulate or not too Insulate - Router Forums
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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 01:56 PM Thread Starter
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Default To insulate or not too Insulate

Ok only been with forum for about a month or so , some reason shows me as new today since I updated my email address .But onto the question I have a 21 x 18 cement block unattached garage I have my wood shop in . I am just getting into the hobby have a few tools and want to get more and materials to start building some projects . the garage is not insulated only heat source for now is a even pure which barley changes the temps. I though of framing the whole think inside and putting fiberglass insulation in between as well as ceiling then covering with 1/4" osb . And putting foam panels on garage door but that is around $750 project that could get me wood and supplies as well as tools for projects. I plan on running a gas line from house in spring for a vented heater of some sorts so glue etc don't freeze. What would some of you folks do to insulate or not to and save money for supplies.
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 02:04 PM
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I think your on the right track . I would do the same, frame the inside and put insulation in the framing .
No easy way to save money on this project in Canada though. You'd be in the thousands.

Just a disclaimer , I am in no way an expert in the field of insulation
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I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 02:51 PM
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Knowing more specifically where you live would help as it would give us some indication of how extreme and in what range your temperatures and humidity are. There are several issues with working in a cold shop. Fist, as you mention, some of your supplies shouldn't freeze. You also can't use most glues below about 50 degrees and if you are trying to put a finish on something it needs to be warmer than that. Then there is rusting because cast iron doesn't change temperature as quickly as the air around it so humidity can condense on your tools. And if it's cold enough the machines are stiff enough that starting them is very hard on them. If they labour starting up it's too cold for them.

I've always considered insulation a cheap investment that just keeps paying you back over and over. Foam insulation might be a better choice because concrete block is porous and the lime in it attracts moisture. Or use Roxul which is less affected by moisture absorption. Remember that heat rises so the greatest loss is through your ceiling. I would recommend a minimum of R30 and 40-60 would be even better. Mine is about R38 and it's pretty good.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 03:09 PM
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Oh what a cracker.... Rick is advising someone to insulate!!

I need a doctor....I'm just about to bust a gut.

Insulation is money well spent. No point buying tools if the workshop is too cold to use them.
Is it Rick?
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
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Knowing more specifically where you live would help as it would give us some indication of how extreme and in what range your temperatures and humidity are. There are several issues with working in a cold shop. Fist, as you mention, some of your supplies shouldn't freeze. You also can't use most glues below about 50 degrees and if you are trying to put a finish on something it needs to be warmer than that. Then there is rusting because cast iron doesn't change temperature as quickly as the air around it so humidity can condense on your tools. And if it's cold enough the machines are stiff enough that starting them is very hard on them. If they labour starting up it's too cold for them.

I've always considered insulation a cheap investment that just keeps paying you back over and over. Foam insulation might be a better choice because concrete block is porous and the lime in it attracts moisture. Or use Roxul which is less affected by moisture absorption. Remember that heat rises so the greatest loss is through your ceiling. I would recommend a minimum of R30 and 40-60 would be even better. Mine is about R38 and it's pretty good.

Ya I should have specified I am in western PA temp can drop below zero in winter but not too often I was just looking at the foam board and furring strip route might be a little cheaper especially when I would have to frame inside with fiberglass insulation . only draw back is R Value is low with foam board but feel any is better than none. Right now all I can do is look at my shop too cold to do any projects in requiring glue ups and finishing . will do ceiling as well.
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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 03:44 PM
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Besides the moisture and tools how about comfort, the shop is warm and is cool in the summertime you'll spend more time there and you will enjoy it more.
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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 04:41 PM
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Howdy, I live in the high desert where the coldest we've gotten is 4 degrees f. Summer it sticks around 100-105. My garage walls are already insulated, but the ceiling is not. We just had a long string on insulation and heating that really covered the waterfront on your questions. But in brief, it boils down to Roxol for your situation is probably best choice for walls. Does not react to moisture.

I have a roll up, steel door with about 22x48 panels. I insulated it last summer with a combination of shiny (like aluminum) surfaced bubble wrap about 1/4 thick, a layer of 1.5 inch foam at about $22 per sheet (used 4), then a second layer of bubble wrap. Total R value is close to 12-13. I then scrubbed the door steel very clean and sealed the insulation in with aluminum duct tape. That closed off air leaks and trapped all the insulation. It really helps.

I'll spare you the gory details of the ceiling, which I'm having done for a cost of about $2300 or so. It will be R38 with half inch dry wall. Its the garage, so there's a gas dryer out there I'll turn on empty to heat the place up. I only do wood prep out in the garage, so don't spend long hours there. A shed doesn't have to account for air flow for a water heater, so you won't have to leave vents in place. Although I am thinking of air source vent to the water heater through the outside, but not sure about code yet.

Without insulation, heating and an AC, you won't enjoy your shop nearly as much as with. Let's face it, this is not necessarily a cheap hobby, although you can reduce costs by careful tool selection and even buying used items. There's no rush, just get basic tools when you need them, or when you run into a great buy.

Dust collection is another thing that's easy to put off, but when you start coughing from the sawdust, it will be a little too late since the really find sawdust cannot be expelled from your lungs.

Since you're kind of new to this topic, you might find the following article helpful, It is about the 17 things that really helped me got going with woodworking over the last decade or so. Just click on the link to read it and many comments from others with their helpful ideas as well. http://www.routerforums.com/featured...ing-curve.html
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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 11:51 PM
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I am preparing to insulate my humble wood shop. Found out wife, her brother and father built this shed before I was in the family. Let me tell you it is a bit comic. I measured the stud spacing and it is reasonably close to 16" O/C but the trusses measure out to around 27.5" O/C. I mentioned it to my wife and she laughed, yep my brother and dad finished framing the roof and found two trusses they forgot to install. They just eyeballed the spacing. I have no clue as to how hard it was to cut the sheathing to fit their oddball spacing.
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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-17-2017, 11:57 PM
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"...and found two trusses they forgot to install."
Lol! First time I've ever heard of someone losing a truss or two on a jobsite.
How do you lose a pair of trusses?
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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 01-18-2017, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmyers View Post
They just eyeballed the spacing. I have no clue as to how hard it was to cut the sheathing to fit their oddball spacing.
The amount of waste can be tremendous. The best policy if you've done that is to strap it with lumber and install metal roofing.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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