Wood shop interior finishing ideas - Router Forums
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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
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Default Wood shop interior finishing ideas

I thought I would start a thread for members who would like to share there ideas for finishing the inside of their shops .

I am trying to decide which material would be best to use on my inside walls and ceiling.

3/4 plywood is far to expensive to use on all the walls and ceiling , and Im not a huge fan of OSB . Drywall is one of the more inexpensive options,but not nail or screw friendly when youd like to attach something to a wall .

My detached garage/wood shop is 22x26, with a 10 ceiling. I was debating on using 1/2 drywall on the ceiling , and also on the 22 wall with the man door and the main garage door.
Then using 13 sheets of 3/4 plywood on the 26 side walls . The bottom 2 could be covered in drywall , as I wont be securing anything down there anyways . Theres also a 2 high concrete wall on the 26 side for the first 9 feet .

My next concern . Im going to blow insulation in the ceiling , so Im wondering if 1/2 drywall will have enough support , or will it eventually start to buckle and look tacky?
I also want to secure 8 fluorescent light fixtures to the ceiling , so I thought using 1/2 OSB on the ceiling would make securing light fixtures a lot easier , plus maybe resist buckling .
I could always add 2x4s between the 2 spaced ceiling trusses for added support , as there inexpensive and would give drywall more areas to secure to if I went that route

I dont always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 04:14 PM
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I cut 1/2" MDF into 5" wide strips, chamfered the edges, and nailed them on like siding. I put a biscuit in between each stud for extra support. It's a lot more durable than drywall, and looks really good when painted.
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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 04:35 PM Thread Starter
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I cut 1/2" MDF into 5" wide strips, chamfered the edges, and nailed them on like siding. I put a biscuit in between each stud for extra support. It's a lot more durable than drywall, and looks really good when painted.
Not sure how feasible that is, but it would sure be easy for a single person to install it that way.
They used mdf in our office . Full sheets and Chamfered the edges ,and it looks pretty good actually.
Your installing a biscuit . I’m assuming your not glueing them in , and the sections can be taken apart?
Was this done on the ceiling also, or just the walls?
Btw ,do you have any pics you could share

I should mention , I have a Dewalt Biscuit joiner ,and have a Festool domino joiner that I’ve never used . I could see where dominos may work in this application to

I dont always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 06-23-2019 at 04:40 PM.
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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 05:10 PM
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Drywall on the ceilings; 5/8 fireguard. It's plenty rigid. I'd use 1/2 " plywood on the walls, probably just the top 4 feet and 1/2" drywall on the bottom as bottom cabinets don't require tons of holding area. OSB smells bad and probably off gases like crazy.
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post #5 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-23-2019, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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Drywall on the ceilings; 5/8 fireguard. It's plenty rigid. I'd use 1/2 " plywood on the walls, probably just the top 4 feet and 1/2" drywall on the bottom as bottom cabinets don't require tons of holding area. OSB smells bad and probably off gases like crazy.
I was also thinking 5/8 would be an improvement over 1/2. 3/4 is a bear to work with at my age , but tempting

I dont always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 12:27 AM
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I used 7/16 OSB walls and ceiling and gave both at least 2 coats of white paint. Besides being able to nail anywhere on a wall I don't have to worry about knocking holes in either one. I screwed the florescent lights into the ceiling joists but the OSB would probably have held them.
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post #7 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 01:08 AM
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5/8ths drywall on the ceiling. Don't forget to put radiant barrier under the roof sheathing, then insulate. I agree half inch drywall on the bottom 4 ft, Wall plugs set just above that. Wire the ceiling before you put up the drywall so you have plugs over your work areas and where your filter hangs. I used wire shelving for one major storage area. You can mount the posts into the studs with long screws. Make sure they are all level. You can adjust the shelves to suit any type of storage you want. I have a lot of stuff stored on two shelves in matching plastic boxes with covers. They nest nicely and come in two depths. I write the contents on the espoxed end with a marker.

do not put shelving in the bottom 12-16 inches from the floor, it will make it much easier to clean the joint out. Color code your electrical circuits so you can visually avoid plugging two tools into the same circuit. Use 2 gang boxes for four outlets at each box.

I would use a thinner ply, no more than half inch on the walls. I have one 24 foot wall that is covered with quarter inch pegboard. This is very handy and visible so I know what little items I have on hand, so I don't keep buying goodies I already have.

No open cabinets if you can help it. Doors keep the sawdust out, and you can make ultra simple enclosures for your wire racks too.

If you're using R13 or blow in a 2x4 wall, put radiant barrier in behind the insulation. If your garage has a peaked roof, you should probably put an exhaust fan in, with an access hatch near it, and that means having vents that feed fresh air into the attic.

Paint the floor with some tough stuff. Makes cleanup a little easier. Put good seals on all the openings, doors, windows. I have cheapo windows on my shop shed, so I covered them with 2 inch insulating foam. Don't get the sunlight, but don't get the heat and cold either.
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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 05:10 AM
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I have 1/2" drywall on the ceiling, probably should have been 5/8" fire-rated, but it's been almost 30 years now and no problems - and 14" of blown-in insulation hasn't caused any problem either. Walls are 7/16" OSB, other than iffy re fire code, depending on your location, it's IMO one of the better ways to go for the reasons that others have stated. One thing I wish I'd done differently would have been to surface mount my receptacles - conduit is CHEAP, and easy to work with, and the added benefit of being able to easily move/add outlets is priceless as your shop layout WILL change over the years. 4x10 OSB sheets seem to be readily available here at Lowes - not sure about God's country up there, but I would think it would be too - about $8 for an 8', $10 for a 10" sheet - so no need to fool with patching in drywall. A note - OSB seems to have a glossy side, and a "porous" side - and the sheets are marked "This Side Out" - make sure that you put the glossy side out where you're going to paint. You're talking 24 sheets, if I did the math correctly, so rent an airless sprayer - the kind you stick in a 5 gal bucket and paint houses with - and cut out all the hard work - some cheap plastic taped around the floor and you can probably paint the whole place in 4 hours. The paint is definitely worth the effort as it brightens the place up, a big plus, but don't go glossy, I like semi-gloss, YMMV.

As an aside, I started attaching the OSB to the studs with a hammer and ring-shank nails which seemed to be taking forever, about halfway over I switched to 1-1/2" narrow-crown staples - the way to go, and the brand I use has some kind of heat-activated adhesive on the legs which is supposed to melt from the friction and then "glue" the legs of the staples into the wood to make them harder to pull out - seems to work as it's a bear when I've tried to take anything apart.
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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 05:42 AM
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Rick, Norm Abrams had an episode of NYW where he installed ply to his shop walls etc. Could be handy for you to watch if you can find it but probably 20 plus years ago.
Also,what DRTom said about "put radiant barrier in behind the insulation" is great advise & used frequently down here in OZ. Good luck with your project, James.
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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-24-2019, 09:52 AM
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I closed off a section of the basement that is supposed to be a garage. I put OSB on the walls. Should have painted it before I put everything in place. That's on my list.
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