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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-03-2010, 08:37 PM Thread Starter
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Default Floor joist replacement

When i bought my house I didnt have it inspected first (I know.......) and the floors are sagging. At some point the previous owner installed a beam up the middle to resupport the joists. now they are sagging to either side of the beam so I have high spots at the walls and center and low spots between. my floor looks like a big "W". After some detective work i have found that the joists are actually 2x6s that are bowed, notched, doubled, scabbed together, and otherwise compromised in all sorts of stupid ways. i want to replace them altogether. Can anyone tell me what the proper procedure is for this? Due to money reasons I need to do this myself instead of spending big money on a contractor
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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-03-2010, 09:43 PM
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When i bought my house I didnt have it inspected first (I know.......) and the floors are sagging. At some point the previous owner installed a beam up the middle to resupport the joists. now they are sagging to either side of the beam so I have high spots at the walls and center and low spots between. my floor looks like a big "W". After some detective work i have found that the joists are actually 2x6s that are bowed, notched, doubled, scabbed together, and otherwise compromised in all sorts of stupid ways. i want to replace them altogether. Can anyone tell me what the proper procedure is for this? Due to money reasons I need to do this myself instead of spending big money on a contractor
Hey Jay,
1st off, is your basement or crawl space dry? This WILL affect the future of your new floor. You want a dry space.
2nd, your existing joists will have nails in them which will "pop" thru the floor sometime in the future if you remove the joist, but not the nails. I don't what access you have to the nails above, is the floor covered? Does it have carpeting and you can pull it back, or is it a vinyl floor covering and its glued down... Additionally the joists will be laid out such that they fall on the breaks of the floor boards, which brings up the next question, do you have T&G 1x floor decking or sheets of plywood? And lastly, what is your span?

So, here's what you want to do in a perfect world, leave the beam. If possible remove 1 floor joist and nails then replace it, one at a time, space them at 16" on center, (14.5" inside gap). For even more support put them at 12" o.c. seeing as they are only 2x6. after about 6 joists go back upstairs and nail them down, lather rinse repeat. You get the drill. maybe it sounds like a lot of work, but you can do it. In fact you may choose to double every other joist to beef up your load capacity. Lastly, look for fir, hem or Doug, both are stronger than spruce.

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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-03-2010, 10:14 PM Thread Starter
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Jack, thanks for the advice. the crawl space is dirt, probably not dry. is there a good way to make it dry? There is T&G 1xs that will be replaced with OSB. The span is approximately 20 feet with a beam down the middle. At the same time i do this, ill be removing all flooring, subfloor, and drywall and redoing the whole end of the house. ill be able to access everything from the top and bottom. I was thinking about replacing the existing 2x6 joists with 2x10s notched at the ends to fit the joist pockets. Is that a good idea or should I stick with 2x6s which I dont really want to do.
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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-03-2010, 11:33 PM
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Jay,

If your going to strip out the floor and have complete access to replace the framing, can I assume that you are working in a single room wing? If this is the case I would rebuild the floor system using 2 girts at 1/3 the span with colunms no more tha 6' o.c.. I would replace the floor joists with new 2x6's @ 12" o.c.( I would not use knoched 2x10's because once you knotch the end, you just ceat a more expencive 2x6.

Keep in mind you need propper ventilation and insulation in the crawl area also if you need to upgrade the heat or eletrical this is a good time to do it.

Good Luck,

Curt
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post #5 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 06:12 AM
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What about when the stud wall is sitting on the subfloor at the end of the joist? How can you be sure it's getting adequate support? How do I tie into the rim joist or must I block and screw the joist end?

Why not just leave the existing joists there and sister new ones along side the old?

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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 12:33 PM
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What about when the stud wall is sitting on the subfloor at the end of the joist? How can you be sure it's getting adequate support? How do I tie into the rim joist or must I block and screw the joist end?

Why not just leave the existing joists there and sister new ones along side the old?
Who's asking the questions, Ron or Jay? Same house? Do you guys know each other...or is somebody hijacking this thread?!
Anyway, Jay, you need to keep some sort of ventilation in your crawl space so that the moisture can escape, but you can also lay down some heavy plastic, (6 mil) and cover that with a thin layer of concrete, like 2" minimum. As someone else said, (I can't see all the names while replying), notched 2x10's loose their integrity, unless you can throw joist hangers on them. Also with a 20' span, yah, use 2 beams with 2x6, or 1 beam with a 2x10. ( The beam should be a triple 2x10 over lapped with any seams placed above a column, the columns should sit on a good solid footer. Footers should be poured about 8'-10' apart and be 2'x2'x10"). Good that you can just rip out all the old floor. If you insulate the floor be sure that any vapor barrier is placed toward the heated living space. If you want the room warm, you will need to insulate, R-19 as a MINIMUM, more is better, but I don't know what environment you live in. Regarding the ventilation, one at each end covered with heavy screen, but allowing free air flow should work.

Jack


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Last edited by Jack Wilson; 11-04-2010 at 12:41 PM.
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post #7 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 12:46 PM
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Why not just leave the existing joists there and sister new ones along side the old?
Because according to his description the joists are bowed, warped, scabbed together... better to just remove them than to fight with them. They now have a 'set' to them and you will never make this go away, instead the new joists will begin to follow suit.

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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 02:41 PM
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Hi Jason

You said it ( "probably not dry" ) I would say you need to fix that 1st., if it's that damp it will not help by fixing the floor...they need a dry base to support them on ..

Note they do make floor joists screw jacks just for that type of job.

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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 03:32 PM
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Who's asking the questions, Ron or Jay? Same house? Do you guys know each other...or is somebody hijacking this thread?!
Sorry Jack & Jay, I'm reading your instructions and following them along. I see at the end of the joist the stud wall sitting on the same joists he's trying to remove and I'm wondering how to deal with that one. Then I see the rim joist. I'm dealing with something similar so I'm looking for all the info I can get.

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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 11-04-2010, 08:33 PM
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Sorry Jack & Jay, I'm reading your instructions and following them along. I see at the end of the joist the stud wall sitting on the same joists he's trying to remove and I'm wondering how to deal with that one. Then I see the rim joist. I'm dealing with something similar so I'm looking for all the info I can get.
Ron you can cut some stubs of your floor joist and leave them in, or place them next to the joists you are going to replace. Of course if your floor is not in as bad condition as it sounds like Jay's floor is in then maybe YOU could sister new joists in place. Not recommended if you have conditions similar to Jay's floor.

Jack


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