Making french doors on a cupboard - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-04-2011, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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Default Making french doors on a cupboard

So I have a wide cupboard door that I want to change from a single to a double door. I have NO clue how to do this because the existing door has a bevelled edge on it which I need to recreate on the two new edges that would be made. You can see the bevel and existing door construction in the pics below. (Is there any way to make these pics larger on this forum?) I have only a hand router. Not even sure that a router is the best way to make that bevel. Perhaps just an angle cut and then sand?

Other item is -- to make the new doors close properly, I guess I need a center vertical for the doors to close onto? The doors are designed to partially recess into the cupboard, though the previous carpenter didn't set the hinges properly. I can do the job with or without a center vertical -- just need some guidance on what is best.

Background: the cupboard was a kitchen cupboard that has been remodelled to be used as a vanity now. Entire job is complete except the doors and backsplash. The door MUST be split into french doors due to space limitations.

Any input and ideas are welcome no matter how crazy. Thanks!

Front
Making french doors on a cupboard-door01.gif
Back
Making french doors on a cupboard-door02.gif
Bevel
Making french doors on a cupboard-door03.gif
Bevel and better profile
Making french doors on a cupboard-door04.gif

As an aside, I actually have two doors so if I mess up one, I can try again!
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-04-2011, 09:40 PM Thread Starter
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Default pic size

Ok -- never mind about the picture size question. I finally figured out how the pictures work here.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2011, 09:12 PM
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Hey MrsO, Welcome!
to address your question, let me pose one, why not just rip the door in half, right down the middle? I think that would look fine, and would only eat up 1/8" of wood.
If that is not acceptable try using a router table, or make one your self with a piece of plywood. You can make your own table with a piece of plywood and a drill. Drill a hole for your bit, (use a bearing bit), and drill and counter sink the holes for your bolts to attach the motor housing to. You will remove your router base for this. Some recommend installing a pin, or small diameter post just a few inches from the bit to allow you some control. Anyway, this will keep everything square with no tipping of the bit and your work should come out beautiful! Of course by all means run a few samples thru to get the feel and be sure your happy with the bit height.

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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2011, 10:56 PM
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My first thought was just start fresh. But I think Jack's idea is better. Rip the door in half and see if you can make it work. If it goes south, just make two new doors. Do you still have the part of the cabinet you cut off? Anything salvageable from that? Maybe you could use it to make new doors.

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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-06-2011, 10:43 AM
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Another vote for trying to rip the current door. I'd remove the support strips from the back side first, though - at least the one at an angle. I'm guessing the builder added them as a means of keeping the panel flat. You may or may not actually need them, depending on the grain orientation of the panel components.

Just watch out for nails or screws when ripping.

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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-06-2011, 09:07 PM Thread Starter
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I would make a new door frames and use the door wood you have for that..you have the face frame to hand the doors in place with the pocket hole hinges..

But I said how about using a door spring to hold the curtains up , the look of the old farm house to go with the pine cabinet and walls..
The above is a suggestion on another thread, but I don't like the curtain idea. I have actually lived in a "farm" house like that and I'm not doing it again

As for ripping the door in half -- that was generally my idea, but I would want the bevel on the new edges and how do I do that? Would I then need a centre vertical for the doors to close on? I would actually take about 1/2" out of the total width of the door/s I figure. If I tried any less, I wouldn't have much give for error I think.

Today I was just thinking about cutting the door in half and hingeing it in the middle. A bifold door I guess it's called. How accurate would that have to be? I have only seen bifold doors with track supports -- would it need any other support doing it without a track? (Like a closet door). This method would elminate the need for the centre vertical and the bevel, I think.

The other issue about ripping the door is that the angle brace is probably there to support the 2 pieces of wide pine that were laminated together to make the door. It is likely glued as well as screwed on. I don't want to take it off unless I have to; I'm concerned about the integrity of it, if I do.

And yes, I have other leftovers from the reno, so I have much leeway in what I do.
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-06-2011, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
And yes, I have other leftovers from the reno, so I have much leeway in what I do.
Then you are in a great position to "experiment".
If you keep the "lip" around the doors I don't see a need for a vertical support. The door will rest against the frame on 3 sides (of each door) and the shelf will provide mid support.
The bevel doesn't look too fancy. Could probably be accomplished carefully with a sander. A large round over bit in a router might work too. Maybe do all the sides with the router to get them uniform. Leave the angle brace in place unless you absolutely have to remove it. I don't see the point of the bifold door. I understand having 2 doors, but the only reason I can see for a bifold door would be if you didn't have enough room to swing a single door open. If that's the case, then I see no reason why you can't split the door and hinge it in the middle like a bifold. A track isn't necessary, it just keeps the door in place. I don't imagine anyone is going to be swinging this door wildly.
Try some things with some scrap wood and see how it looks.

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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-08-2011, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckGal View Post
Then you are in a great position to "experiment".
If you keep the "lip" around the doors I don't see a need for a vertical support. The door will rest against the frame on 3 sides (of each door) and the shelf will provide mid support.
The bevel doesn't look too fancy. Could probably be accomplished carefully with a sander. A large round over bit in a router might work too. Maybe do all the sides with the router to get them uniform. Leave the angle brace in place unless you absolutely have to remove it. I don't see the point of the bifold door. I understand having 2 doors, but the only reason I can see for a bifold door would be if you didn't have enough room to swing a single door open. If that's the case, then I see no reason why you can't split the door and hinge it in the middle like a bifold. A track isn't necessary, it just keeps the door in place. I don't imagine anyone is going to be swinging this door wildly.
Try some things with some scrap wood and see how it looks.
+1 on these suggestions. From reading your post and seeing the outcome of the vanity, I think this would be an easy job for you. It seems the bevel is your biggest concern, and the suggestion from CanuckGal is right on. Don't worry about trying to match the existing bevel, get a router bit that is close and go around the whole door.

Also as CanuckGal stated, the shelf and the three sides of the door contacting the face should be sufficient to support them.

It looks great so far, and I am sure you will do a fine job on the doors.

Darrin
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-08-2011, 02:28 PM Thread Starter
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I was thinking of the vertical piece as aesthetic value only. The purpose being that when the two doors close, there wouldn't be a space between the doors and if they don't line up just perfectly it will help to hide that.

I'm going to try to rip the door -- I'm actually going to set the saw on an angle and see how close I can get to the existing bevel. Then maybe I can just sand it.

Here I go.....
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-08-2011, 04:57 PM
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Good point about the vertical. DOH! I was just thinking of tight fitting doors I guess. LOL Be sure to post pics when you finish!

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