1" rough sawn pine for small shed sheathing? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 09:22 AM Thread Starter
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Default 1" rough sawn pine for small shed sheathing?

Hi there,

I'm considering plywood alternatives for an outhouse I'm building, including using 1x12" rough sawn pine boards instead of plywood sheathing, and putting a rabbet on either end to shiplap them (as well as perhaps a cosmetic chamfer.) My question is, would this be strong enough for a 4'x4' shed/outhouse? I'm pretty sure it would be, but it'd be pretty obnoxious to have to redo it or have the thing collapse.. :P

From my calculations, it'd cost a bit more than plywood, but I'd save because I'd just stain the whole thing and skip the siding!
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 12:21 PM
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It may develop some checking cracks, but I don't see why not to use the pine. Definitely more rustic.

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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 12:37 PM
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Pine boards were used for a long time before plywood was ever invented. Today, you'll still find old pine siding on some houses in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.
I noticed that you mentioned using it as sheathing.... which is different from siding. Sheathing is what goes underneath the siding and is normally set parallel to the dirt. Pine siding would be better set perpendicular as a board and batten.
If you are far enough west, you might look for a local mill that can cut some cedar siding for you. I've used both board and batten and lapped cedar. They both look good and last a lot longer than pine.

what ever you decide on, make sure your studs are close enough together if you aren't going to sheath under the siding.... if you don't you'll find out how much pine, cedar, oak, maple, elm, poplar or anything else can warp in just one season.

DF

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Originally Posted by bobbotron View Post
Hi there,

I'm considering plywood alternatives for an outhouse I'm building, including using 1x12" rough sawn pine boards instead of plywood sheathing, and putting a rabbet on either end to shiplap them (as well as perhaps a cosmetic chamfer.) My question is, would this be strong enough for a 4'x4' shed/outhouse? I'm pretty sure it would be, but it'd be pretty obnoxious to have to redo it or have the thing collapse.. :P

From my calculations, it'd cost a bit more than plywood, but I'd save because I'd just stain the whole thing and skip the siding!
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 02:13 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dal300 View Post
Pine boards were used for a long time before plywood was ever invented. Today, you'll still find old pine siding on some houses in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.
I noticed that you mentioned using it as sheathing.... which is different from siding. Sheathing is what goes underneath the siding and is normally set parallel to the dirt. Pine siding would be better set perpendicular as a board and batten.
If you are far enough west, you might look for a local mill that can cut some cedar siding for you. I've used both board and batten and lapped cedar. They both look good and last a lot longer than pine.

what ever you decide on, make sure your studs are close enough together if you aren't going to sheath under the siding.... if you don't you'll find out how much pine, cedar, oak, maple, elm, poplar or anything else can warp in just one season.

DF
I'm planning on doing 12" centers on the studs. I did mean sheathing, and forgo siding all together (the horizontal to the ground pine would be both.) Yeah, I thought about cedar, heh, that might be good for the outhouse odors too..
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 02:14 PM
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Do you have a computer and internet connection, yet not a flush toilet? I would trade any tool I have to keep our flush toilets! GOD BLESS YOU! I have utilized outhouses for their typical purpose and I agree 100% - you would never want one to collapse! OPG3
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-01-2011, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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Do you have a computer and internet connection, yet not a flush toilet? I would trade any tool I have to keep our flush toilets! GOD BLESS YOU! I have utilized outhouses for their typical purpose and I agree 100% - you would never want one to collapse! OPG3
Haha. The outhouse is not here, but at a cottage property..
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-02-2011, 12:13 AM
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If your running vertical siding with no sheathing then use horizontal framing members 16" on center between corner posts Use a dble 2X4 on edge on top of posts to support roof You will also need tp notch a wind brace into framing members to keep walls from racking
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-02-2011, 01:27 AM
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Hi Rob
How about sheeting it with Plywood T1-11 It's an exterior grade ply wood but will also give you the look of the pine siding you are thinking about. Being that it is a plywood it will also keep your structure square & keep it from racking. It is used in building sheds & outbuildings.

Oriental Lumber - Products

Shop Plytanium 96"L x 48"W x 19/32"D Rough-Sawn 8" on Center Natural T1-11 Wood Siding at Lowes.com

James
Whittier, CA.

Have a nice & safe day!
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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-02-2011, 06:58 AM Thread Starter
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Now that's a good idea!

I think I'm not going to do the board thing, it looks like it'll take too much time, and I think this project just needs to get done. :P The exterior siding plywood sounds like a great idea, I think I'll do that!

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Hi Rob
How about sheeting it with Plywood T1-11 It's an exterior grade ply wood but will also give you the look of the pine siding you are thinking about. Being that it is a plywood it will also keep your structure square & keep it from racking. It is used in building sheds & outbuildings.

Oriental Lumber - Products

Shop Plytanium 96"L x 48"W x 19/32"D Rough-Sawn 8" on Center Natural T1-11 Wood Siding at Lowes.com
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-02-2011, 11:30 AM
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Just make sure you seal that T-111 front and all edges or it will warp badly and deteriorate within a few years.
Once the outside is sealed with paint, poly, or Thompsons Water Seal, wait until the inside acclimates to the ambient and seal it also.

This is from about five years experience building yard barns and allowing the home owner to paint the siding at his leisure.
I use to get call backs within a year of a home owner painting both sides immediately and within a year and a half of the home owners that would slap a coat of paint on the outside but not seal the edges.

It seemed that unsealed T-111 dealt better with the elements for about 2 - 3 years, but then would start sucking moisture at the bottom, even if there was no contact at the ground, and had a drip edge attached.

It doesn't take long for siding to delam if it's not taken care of properly.
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