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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 08:29 AM Thread Starter
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mMy wife wants a new kitchen...anybopdy gone through thisa before-what GENERAL ADVICE DO YOU HAVE TO START ME?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by tbear72 View Post
mMy wife wants a new kitchen...anybopdy gone through thisa before-what GENERAL ADVICE DO YOU HAVE TO START ME?
It will probably be both easier and cheaper to replace the wife with one that's happy with your current kitchen.

What tools do you have or are willing to purchase for this project? Have you built any cabinets before? Do you and your wife have the patience for a long-term project that will take weeks if not months to complete? You could buy some of the components and make others yourself, if you don't want to do the entire project yourself (e.g. you could build the basic plywood boxes yourself, and buy manufactured doors and drawers.)
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 10:15 AM
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When planning out your kitchen you need to have plenty of measurements on hand. If you are planning to install any new appliances you need to have them or know there measurements. Draw out a plan with your measurements on paper. Buy a construction calculator if you do not have one. A simple one from Home Depot will do. Most plywood is not 3/4" but actually measures out to be 11/16". Not a big deal but in a long cabinet it could compound itself.

Building a kitchen yourself you will need some equipment. Here's some dvd's that show how to build cabinets,doors,& glass doors. Not expensive but packed with information on building these items. The book is informative also. There is also Youtube to see different techniques done. Don't know what your skill level is or what equipment you have but you can farm out what you cannot handle.

Marc Sommerfeld's New Expanded DVD Collection

Amazon.com: Building Kitchen Cabinets (9781561584703): Udo Schmidt Dip: Books

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Whittier, CA.

Have a nice & safe day!
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 06:39 PM
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mMy wife wants a new kitchen...anybopdy gone through thisa before-what GENERAL ADVICE DO YOU HAVE TO START ME?
Yikes - I think Lex may have something there. First off, you need to determine exactly what you like about the kitchen you have and what you dislike. Then what features you want. All that needs to be pretty specific. Last time I did a complete kitchen makeover it was 6 months just getting through that part. Then, as James pointed out, you need measurements, lots of measurements, electric, plumbing, walls etc. What is good to keep, what can go and what needs moved.. Lotsa fun
Good Luck

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 07:01 PM
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First and foremost set a budget range. Then ask yourself if you have the skills and patience to do what you want done. If not, research local contractors to determine who you would like to contact. Talk to them about your budget. Be aware some will manage the whole project but some will only do cabinets, floors, etc. The electrical and plumbing will be left to you to do or arrange. Remember the biggest cost in a kitchen is materials and appliances. Labor is a lesser cost.
If you decide you can do it yourself, think about going somewhere for a design or consultation. Kitchens are all about effective use of space and you are not expert in this. If you don't want design help then you are into months of research and planning as already pointed out. Be prepared for months of disruption if you take it on yourself doing it at night and weekends. Will your family be able to deal with this?
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by tbear72 View Post
mMy wife wants a new kitchen...anybopdy gone through thisa before-what GENERAL ADVICE DO YOU HAVE TO START ME?
I tend to agree with Lex
But seriously, all the others here are raising legitimate points, a lot depends on your skill level and equipment available. Basic cabinet boxes are relatively easy to build. With a Kreg pocket jig you can even make them without any complicated joinery.
Another route is to use stock cabinets if your abilities and/or time are not in abundance. It may not be as rewarding as building everything from scratch, but it will get the job done.
All the points about measuring and planning can't be stressed enough. To quote my Grandfather, "First plan the work... Then work the plan."

Whatever route you ultimately choose, good luck, and keep in mind there are many people here that have done this for a living for many years and will gladly answer any questions. Remodeling a kitchen is probably one of the most stressful things a couple can do. Be patient and learn to say Yes Dear a lot! Remember, "happy wife = happy life"

Tim

"The difficult we do immediately... The impossible takes a little longer" - Grandpa

Don't worry about nothin', aint nothin' gonna turn out right anyway" - Dad
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 07:30 PM
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Two years ago I started building a shop to build my kitchen cabinets for kitchen remodel. I just began the kitchen. it took that long to develop the skills needed.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-05-2012, 08:08 PM
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Depends on what "new kitchen" means.
Is it a refacing job on existing cabinetry, countertop replacement, new appliances or....
a total gut, new layout, new cabinetry, new floor, wall treatments, etc.

As mentioned prior..... measure, measure, measure, no matter what is done.

Check ceiling for level too, tall wall cabs (ie. top to ceilings with crown) can be problematic if ceilings are way out of level.

Face frame cases can be a little more forgiving than "pure" Euro style in terms of accuracy of construction, installation, scribing and final setup for door/drawer alignments etc.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-07-2012, 08:38 AM
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I'm pretty much in the same boat! I've been gearing and reading up for it. I have a place to store my cabinets as I build them, at the shop that I work for. So I'll take my time and build all my cabinets, and then after that's done, demo and begin to rebuild. I'm not moving anything (appliance wise), so I don't forsee to many big problems. Plus I have a son that's a blumber, if needed it. And I can do household wiring. I will probably begin the cabinets in a week or so. I'll probably get a professional to do the countertops, and my son and I will do the rest.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 02-02-2012, 12:37 AM
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Default Chinese sliders.

[ "As mentioned prior..... measure, measure, measure, no matter what is done."

Check ceiling for level too, tall wall cabs (ie. top to ceilings with crown) can be problematic if ceilings are way out of level.

Face frame cases can be a little more forgiving than "pure" Euro style in terms of accuracy of construction, installation, scribing and final setup for door/drawer alignments etc.[/QUOTE]

With chinese materials also you need to check, "...no mater what is done."
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We, woodworkers are everywhere!!!
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