Corian Sink Removal - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-18-2013, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
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Default Corian Sink Removal

Hi All! I am trying to figure out how to apply a router to remove an undermounted corian kitchen sink. (The sink is cracked and must be replaced) For the life of me, I can't find any router bits that will do the job I require.

For a bit of background on what I'm attempting to accomplish it's all in this video here: youtu.be/750ueuL91ds?t=59s

(Apologies - you have to copy and paste the link, because I'm prevented from including the http:// portion of the link...)

This video demonstrates exactly how I want to remove my sink. However, I'm unable to find a standard router bit that either looks like this guy's massive bit, or a standard bit that can do the job. (I'm also unable to find the type of router shown here - unusual!)

Where my corian sink mates to the countertop there is 1" of material that must be removed in order to cut the sink away from the countertop and I can't find any standard router bit that will cut that deep. The deepest Slot Cutter bit seems to go to about 3/8".

I've also attached an image that shows a cross-section of the sink. The 1" section that mates to the countertop is circled and labeled "See Detail B". The x dimension of that lip is 1")

I'd appreciate any ideas or insights!
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 06:09 AM
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Morning, for this one I would not use a router for removal but a Fein Multi-master (vibratory tool) with a circular or 1/2 moon bit, then switch to a router with deep rabbiting bit for clean-up. This assumes you are going to go with a drop-in replacement sink. A fine tooth jig saw or 4 1/2" circular saw might also work.

Good luck - Baker
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 06:42 AM
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I saw a sink removal bit at Bruce Adhesives and supply. Site says it was made to Dupont specs. Also Andreas custom design has one along with dustless template.

Roger
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 07:10 AM
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Hi Ivan

The "standard" method I've used a couple of times for sink removal in-situ (i.e. where it is not possible to remove the worktop/counter) is a specialist sink removing tool, based on the router like the Pinske Edge tool which allows in-situ removal of sinks even when the worktop/countertop has an upstand (very common). They are a lot like a giant version of the offset base available for laminate trimmers





Over here we can hire these by the day or week - good job, too at that price! In the USA there are several firms who hire them out as well, including Pinske. The cutters are available separately but at $229 a pop they aren't cheap either. If you are dealing with a top without obstructions such as upstands in the way (e.g. in an island unit) there is a cheaper wing bowl cut-out bit available (for anyone in the EU Wealden Tool do a sink bowl slitter for a very reasonable 53.70 - Titman and Trend also sell similar items)





The dimension "E" above is 27mm, or 1-1/16in.

In both cases you'll need to support the sink to stop it breaking away from the top and leaving you with a real headache of repair work - the blue "spider" in the first photo is a sink support designed for the purpose.

One thing I'll say is that solid surface requires a fairly powerful router, so a P-C 690 just won't be man enough for the job (unless, that is, you like the smell of fried motor windings and blue smoke)

The above assumes that you are going with a replacement solid surface bonded-in sink, or an undermounted stainless steel replacement type as opposed to a drop-in design

Regards

Phil

"Unfortunately there is lots of bad information online; some of it is really scary. It's probably not intentional, but I've seen some content that sets up the illusion that you can do whatever you want and get away with it" - Norm Abram in an interview with Jefferson Kolle

Last edited by Phil P; 02-19-2013 at 08:48 AM.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 07:12 AM
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I agree with rwbaker. The simplest method would be to use a reciprocating saw to cut out the old sink and replace it with a drop in of the appropriate size.

Finding a router bit large (long) enough as well as buying a heavy duty router will be callenging and expensive.

Good luck.

David
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 10:35 AM
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Hi Ivan,
I'm in the same boat. The questions you raise are the reason I've been procrasinating. My latest plan is a work-around: an undermounted Aluminum sink. I plan to remove the existing corian sink with a sawz-all or whatever and then use a router to clean the underside lip as much as possible. It will be impossible to get a router into the back where there is probably a blacksplash. I suspect I'll have to try a dremel tool or a grinder to clean the back lip. If there are places where I can't clean the underlip, I can always trim the lip of the aluminum sink. Just a thought. I haven't worked out the details yet.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 11:14 AM
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Hi Guys. The sawzall idea might work; problem is getting a perfectly straight cut with them is almost impossible. Renting a tool (if you are in/near a big city with a wide selection) would be my choice. And get one designed for that job. That way you could have your choice of replacement sinks. Tim
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 01:10 PM
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You can order a bit that is designed to cut the bowl out from couterco-savannah, vp-30-465. 1(800)811-3744. We use porter cable 7519 to cut bowls out. The bit from couterco is made by velepec. If you have the router and plan on doing more than one buy the bit. But if you do not have a router to do it or the bit you will be better off to get in touch with a solid surface countertop manufacturer and let them cut it out. If you are replacing with a drop in I would just make a template for the new sink and use a plunge router to cut it out. Just make sure you support the old sink when you are cutting it out.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-19-2013, 11:08 PM
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Your router with an offset base,even homemade, and the bit Phil P. suggest should get the job done nicely.

The problem that I see with a 'Sawsall' is getting the cut aligned properly for the replacement to be installed.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-20-2013, 05:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elrodqfudp View Post
The problem that I see with a 'Sawsall' is getting the cut aligned properly for the replacement to be installed.
I just looked up "Sawzall" - it's a recipro saw - a DEMOLITION SAW! It's the sort of tool I'd use for roughing out a window opening in a wall or demolishing a stud wall. As you can tell, I think that it would be all but impossible to choose a less capable tool. Unless you have absolutely massive sinks in the USA I fail to see how you will even get one into a sink to make the cut (I've used Hilti, Makita and Bosch recipros which is why I'm saying this - my experience of USA-style sinks, which are larger than ours in Europe is, however, limited to a few installs). If you could get the saw in to make the cut how are you going to ensure that the saw blade doesn't damage the cabinets either side of the sink unit, and for that matter the water pipes embedded in the wall (or even clipped to the wall) at the back of the sink. I'd also be very concerned anout the amount of vibration a recipro saw is going to introduce into the countertop. With a recipro saw there is, I feel, the real risk of cracking/breaking the countertop to upstand joints.

I've got to say, equally that I'm not convinced that a Multisaw, such as the Fein is up to the job (and I own one of those for trim work). The 12mm (1/2in) Corian used to mould sinks is very tough material to cut and takes a lot of power - hence my comments and those of others about needing a powerful router - and the little Fein just doesn't have that much power. They actually get pretty hot cutting timber so 30 to 40 minutes cutting out a Corian sink might well see one off (burn it out). I'll make a test cut in some 12mm Corian sheet offcuts this morning to see how quickly my FMM250Q will actually cut the stuff and report back

Using an unguided saw to make a cut like this will inevitably result in a really rough cut which will be all but impossible to disguise and which will make for real problems getting a good, leak-proof seal between the underside of the worktop/countertop and the new sink bowl. That's why the trade boys have developed the specialised tools to do this job

Regards

Phil

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