coping oak baseboard. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2013, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
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Default coping oak baseboard.

I have found it next to impossible to use a regular coping saw for coping this oak.

Does anyone know of a better way?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2013, 08:33 PM
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Cut a 45 degree angle on the baseboard to give you the perfect outline for the cut. You can then cut with a coping saw or a jig saw.

If you have a lot to do, they sell a coping shoe for your jigsaw to make it easier.

http://www.collinstool.com/base.php?...oping_foot.htm

http://www.hartvilletool.com/product...aw-accessories

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Last edited by kp91; 04-03-2013 at 08:38 PM.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2013, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
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I knew about the 45. I also knew there was a jig like the 2nd one, but did not have enough posts to link that.

Have you used either of those rigs?

Is there a best blade?
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-03-2013, 09:23 PM
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N/a
Do not know if is kosher but could not find coping saw once used my dermal
a small sanding drum cut the 45 and ground it down, work great do not know if I would want do a whole house.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-04-2013, 04:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbokie5 View Post
Have you used either of those rigs?

Is there a best blade?
I use a Collins Coping Foot for scribes (copes). It requires a T244D blade - no other will do (it has a fair amount of side set for cutting curves) - it also requires a simpler jigsaw so the Bosch and Festool models with extra blade guides won't accept it. For those who've never seen one, the "boat-shaped" silver foot on the jigsaw is the Collins Foot



For safest/fastest use you should make yourself a simple box jig to hold the moulding you are scribing.



Works well and is very fast. I have done some very big jobs with this tool. A good coping saw man is almost as fast for the first couple of cuts, but after 30 or so you do tend to slow down using a manual saw - the jigger never tires!



Above: Waste cuts to speed-up scribe (cope). On simpler skirting (baseboard) cuts this isn't necessary
Below: The scribe (cope) being made. This never fails to scare the bejesus out of quite a few of my colleagues but it's actually quite safe so long as you keep the "spare" hand behind the blade. The jigsaw is used inverted and from beneath to allow you to make a clean cut (the blade is cutting downwards into the finish side), add back clearance and to give visibility on the cut line




Below: A completed scribed (coped) joint. This is an extremely deep sprung architrave moulding (more like cornice/crown moulding) in solid oak which would have possibly pulled apart had the joint been mitred. The plasterwork was also a couple of degrees off square



That saw is a very beaten-up old Metabo D-handle jigsaw - nothing special - when it died it was replaced by another old jigsaw, this time a body grip model which is easier to manouver in sharp corners

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Phil

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Last edited by Phil P; 04-04-2013 at 05:55 AM. Reason: Added photos
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-04-2013, 06:51 AM Thread Starter
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Awesome!

Thanks to all. I can pick up the blue jig for cheap and will order the foot just to see how it goes.

Thanks again, most kindly.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 04:02 PM
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You could do it on a table saw after you cut the 45 degree. Makes the long point real sharp.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 05:15 PM
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You could do it on a table saw after you cut the 45 degree. Makes the long point real sharp.
Hi Bradley

Nice idea, and there is (was?) a machine out there which does (did?) something along those lines called a Copemaster but that's a whole different ball game, not to mention expensive (at circa $2300 - or rather it was, sadly the makers seem to have disappeared).

As for using a table saw I can see a few rather major problems with that - skirting board (baseboard) can often be really long pieces, even in oak it's not uncommon to have to scribe (cope) pieces 10 or 12ft long which would be simply unmanageable on a table saw IMHO, especially single handed (the Copemaster moved the blade relative to the material). Having tried this with smaller pieces I have to tell you it isn't easy to make a good cut without either over cutting or undercutting (both time wasters) and on some deeply shaped mouldings the saw blade can break through in the wrong place. Another issue will be the hassle of dragging both a table saw and a mitre saw around site with you (together with the box load of other tools like pinner, caulking gun, block plane, jigsaw, etc)

Regards

Phil

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Last edited by Phil P; 04-07-2013 at 11:50 AM.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 08:42 PM
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-07-2013, 01:48 PM
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Phil P, seems to work for me. Only offering an option. To each his own...
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