DIY Scrap Granite Kitchen Counter - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 06:32 PM Thread Starter
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Default DIY Scrap Granite Kitchen Counter

Lowered the counters 1" and remounted. Remember- The granite was free slab scraps.

Trimmed up all the black w/ blue/gray granite I collected. Didn't really have enough of that to do the whole counter. I had a lot of deep black with copper/gold flecks in it, so decided to border it with that. So that is going around the edge and around the sink.

I wanted to run the same width border in the front of the corner cabinet, but got nixed by Sharon as her wanting a full piece. That deep black with the flecks was a good choice as that ties everything back with the oak. We wish we could have done it all with that, but it was collected scraps, so it is what we got. It was a jigsaw as we had to maximize the use of the odd scraps we collected over time.

The backsplash is just rough cut for now and set up there for the photos. I'm going to trim it out with poplar edge band with a round over, to tie it back into all the trim in the house and the island trim.

Next will be to put up some temp forms on the edges and set the stone in quickset. The quickset I'm using is for Granite and bonds well to plywood.

It's coming along. Have to pace myself with the shoulder.
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"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
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Last edited by MAFoElffen; 08-27-2013 at 01:58 AM.
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 11:13 PM
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Very classy! Nice job, Mike.
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 02:07 AM
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"If the cook aint happy, aint nobody happy"..

I feel that Sharon should be pleased, Mike.

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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 06:47 AM
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Do you have a method for trimming or cleaning up edges?
I will be using Silestone for splashbacks/window sills and may need to trim it.

Regards,

Alan.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 11:23 AM
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That looks great Mike. You are getting pretty handy with the puzzle work using granite pieces.
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 11:47 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by WurliTzerwilly View Post
Do you have a method for trimming or cleaning up edges?
I will be using Silestone for splashbacks/window sills and may need to trim it.
Thanks all.

Cutting & Trimming-
I was using a borrowed Husky 7" wet saw. The stone is 1-1/4" thick and that saw's depth of cut was 1-1/4". It was just barely enough to get through. So when I was starting out, it was getting chipping on that top edge, it was taking forever and it was hard to get a straight edge or square corners. It was all by "eye." To get a bevel, half the table tilt's and you had to hld the stone steady above the blade. No fence. It was a struggle and took a long time. Once I got to fitting the stone, it was taking forever.

HF had a sale on their 2-1/2 hp commercial 10" wet saw. Over $150 off. I broke down. Everything was a lot faster and easier. If you are trying to trim off just a slight angle with a diamond blade in thick granite, there is a lot of blade flex. That saw, besides the sliding table, you can vary the depth of cut and or use it like a chop saw. Made things possible and it was easy to square things up better.


Cleaning up the edges-
Granite and marble you put a slight 45 degree bevel on the top edges to clean them up. With ceramics and suck you can just take a carborundum rub stone for a masonry file wile carborundum) and a few swipes and you're good. Granite and marble is harder. I started out with using a sanding pad with 40 grit wet/dry (metal) belting and a diamond stone by hand. It was taking my forever. I took hours and I didn't feel like I accomplished much.

I broke down and bought a diamond turbo cup for my 4-1/2" angle grinder. Made that quick work. A pass or two at 45 degrees on each edge. A couple hours and I was done.

-- Funny how making tiles with thick stone ends up more like precision brick and block work. And I wanted to get accurate thin grout lines between, so it's been taking a while. This all would be all different if this was just thin lighter ceramic or softer stone tiles. Even with using thinner marble or granite. I used to help my partner who was a tile guy (cutting for him while he laid). I've done some tile work on my own after that. But, I'm thinking "tile work" is easy after doing this. I've learned a lot.

Granite and Marble slab starts out as 1-1/4. That is what stays as the edges of a counter. From there, for a counter, they thin out (plane) all but the edges, so what sits on the counters is 3/4" thick.


EDIT-- Notice the duct tape over foam rubber? First night I had the counter base installed, Sharon gouged her back on it, trying to cut the corner. I forgot she has a habit of that. The island counter edgebanding I have rounded "for her." That is my safety measure until the edgebanding is on there...

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 08-27-2013 at 01:05 PM.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 06:34 PM
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Looks good so far.

When you get ready to do the wood trim I would suggest staining and finishing it first. Don't finish the portion of the edge where you will have wood meeting wood but do make sure to finish the portion of the edge where wood will meet the stone. Then when it is installed use silicone sealant between the trim and stone and waterproof glue where wood meets wood. This will help keep water from working down under the stone.

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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-11-2013, 11:00 PM
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Very cool I like it. Nice to make use of scrap material and not fill up the landfill, way to go!
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-30-2013, 04:38 AM
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Hi Mike. Is your stone project ready? Do you have photo of it?
In the residence of the Finnish Ambassador in Cuba Havanna the kitchen tables where similar to yours but made of white ceramic tiles. The kitchen might have been bigger than your's. Can't say. Your foto was quite uninformative in that sense. Your kitchen looks much nicer.
What sealant did you use betwene wood and stone. In my opinion Silicone isn't nesessary the best sealing compound when talking about joining wood to some hard material. It fills the gaps but it doesn't attache to the wood, it's not glue. The bacteria colonys starts to grow there.

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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 10-01-2013, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
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Hi Mike. Is your stone project ready? Do you have photo of it?
In the residence of the Finnish Ambassador in Cuba Havanna the kitchen tables where similar to yours but made of white ceramic tiles. The kitchen might have been bigger than your's. Can't say. Your foto was quite uninformative in that sense. Your kitchen looks much nicer.
What sealant did you use betwene wood and stone. In my opinion Silicone isn't nesessary the best sealing compound when talking about joining wood to some hard material. It fills the gaps but it doesn't attache to the wood, it's not glue. The bacteria colonys starts to grow there.
To grout between the edges (stone and trim) I used a grout/caulk made of acrylic/silicone. Easy to use, seals well and also bonds many things including to silicone.

Honestly, with vacation away, coming back to things (VA programs for vocational rehab) pressed onto me and my truck needing repairs, I had to reprioritize where me time and money went.

Sadly, I had to put the stone on hold for a little while. They are all laid out, ready to set. We are using the counter, but no hurry. I have everything to do it except the time. I'll get back to it.

Right not (such as the next 2 days), recovering from a storm, where there was over 12 inches of rain and over 100 mph gusts of wind. Have to pick up and winterize. I have to put things inside that have been out to make room in the garage to work. Will be tight. But none the less. Too much water (we only get less than 53 days without rain here) or snow will ruin whats out there.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
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