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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Default Next project- New shed.

I mentioned on other threads that Sharon came up on her own that the garage was too small as a shop and the honey list was getting too long. (She has a list of projects that she wants personally each time she see's something I turn out or talk about... LOL) That I needed more room to work. We needed to move some more stuff out. Bless her!!!

We talked about either a shed or an enclosed carport. We decided that another shed would be cheaper to start out with. Most of the extra's in the shop are either still being used or too heavy to getting into the other utility shed which is up a hill and has stairs to get into.

WE decided on the shed. It will be 10' by 10' with double doors. It will be located and open adjacent to the concrete driveway (just outside the garage). That way we can just the pallet jack if needed. First that will go in there is her commercial sun bed, 2 freezers, the extra stove/oven/range, my commercial welders, overflow tool storage and hardwoods.

I figured down the road, if I still needed more room to work, we could then do the carport and it wouldn't need to be enclosed.

We've been looking at kits... and I like a mix of two kits. I like the footprint of one and the height and overhead storage of another. I've been trying to figure out if I should just get a kit and modify the height... or to just buy the materials myself and build my own.

I already tolded it over with my neighbor, because the back side is going to be within 1 foot of the property line. She okay'ed it. Done enough for her and her kids that I didn't think there would be a problem, but you have to not take those things for granted.

That is where I am now with that. Will post here as that comes together.

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Last edited by MAFoElffen; 08-26-2013 at 06:54 PM.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 06:59 PM
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If you have to modify the kit to any degree then you might as well work from scratch. At least that is my experience. Taller means a lot of storage for occasional and seasonal items up high.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 11:04 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
If you have to modify the kit to any degree then you might as well work from scratch. At least that is my experience. Taller means a lot of storage for occasional and seasonal items up high.
I am starting to figure out that with all the things that are not included (like the floor and roofing) what is the selling point to me of buying a kit? I might as well just buy the materials and start from scratch.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-26-2013, 11:11 PM
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Mike; I'm pretty sure your neighbour can't authorize a change to a zoning regulation. The risk is that if your neighbour moves away, and the new owners object, you will be moving the shed. The square footage is probably under the permit-required limit...hence the 10' x 10' ?
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-27-2013, 07:55 AM
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Dan has a good, legal point. Kits, in my experience still leave too much that needs to be stronger or just better suited for specific needs. I, personally would build 12x12 to be more material efficient - it's that 4' grid thing.. Use good plywood for all sheathing and you should be able to forego any let-in bracing, use purlins if the walls are above 8' tall.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-11-2013, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
I am starting to figure out that with all the things that are not included (like the floor and roofing) what is the selling point to me of buying a kit? I might as well just buy the materials and start from scratch.
Kits are cheap and usually have no extra material in case you make a mistake. Youo have the know how design what will work for you and get busy! lol
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2013, 07:33 AM
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Ummm Mike?

Check with the city and/or your community "whatever you call them"... OH! Association.
That's the term I was looking for... (took a second.) Don't even think about doing a thing till
you talk to them, first. (Starting with the city - I'm sure there's an ordinance of some sort in
place). Then talk to the subdivision Association, if you have one. I would hate for you to go
through all that work for naught.

Barb


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Last edited by OutoftheWoodwork; 09-12-2013 at 07:37 AM.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2013, 08:10 AM
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Even if you don't have a homeowner's/subdivision association, your deed should define limits to outbuildings, etc. Best to start with the city or county offices.

John T.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2013, 11:05 AM
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Heed Barb's and John's advice. Your neighbour presently may not object to the encroachment with the new shed but other may in the future. If your neighbour decides to sell the property she will require a Real Property report which essentially shows the property boundary. If the survey comes back showing an encroachment and you have no letter of agreement on record you may be forced to move the shed.

It is always a good thing to pull a building permit and get approval directly with the city or county. Usually the permit application will require a real property report and a set of plans what you intend to build.

In my area the City stipulates the size or footprint based on a percentage of the lot size. The buildings can not exceed a percentage of the overall lot size. The other restriction which can be overlooked is the height of the shed and the pitch of roof you put on it.

All of these questions can be answered when you pull a permit. The inspectors are usually available on hand at the office or can be reached by phone to answer direct questions.

Good luck and I know you will make sure you have all your t's crossed and i's dotted before you start the project.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 09-12-2013, 11:18 AM
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In my county, you can put up a shed/shop no larger than 16'X16' (well, can be different sizes, but cannot exceed 256 square feet), and it will not require a building permit. Any over that, and you require a building permit, and all that goes with it.

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