Non Wood working automotive - Router Forums
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-01-2016, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Default Non Wood working automotive

In process of adding wiring for trailer hitch on my car. Need to make a few crimp connections. I have the cheep crimper and stripper. Any recommendations on tools not confident?
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-01-2016, 09:31 PM
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Klein makes very good tools for the electricians.

“We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it and stop there lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove lid again and that is well but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore.” - Mark Twain
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-01-2016, 11:19 PM
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you know what we always say about cheap.

"Buy cheap, then buy expensive to repair the damage when the cheap one fails".

The cheap crimp pliers have a couple faults. 1 is that you cant get the same pressure joint to joint. 2 is that the jaws are so narrow if you use too much force you can cut the joint like your using side cutters.
There is a crimper that has springs and ratchets that will always give the same pressure. They are a a bit expensive if you dont make very many connections, so my advice is if the wiring is going to be on the trailer forever, solder the joints because crimp connectors regularly come loose with vibration and dirt.
Dont use the scotchlock type connectors where you fold a flap over and press it down. They WILL fail on a moving vehicle.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-01-2016, 11:58 PM
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I only use Thomas & Betts crimpers and connectors . I never use insulated , instead I crimp and put heat shrink on all my connectors

I don’t always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 01:45 AM
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wow, having a named brand of connectors is a step too far for me (g).

If I'm wiring motorcycles or cars and its going to be there for the life of the vehicle, I always slide heat shrink on first, then twist the wires together and solder. Then a put a dab of silicone on the joint itself, then heat shrink till silicone is spread all the way along.
If I know it will be removed in the near future, and its a pain getting the soldering gear out for 2 joints, then I'll crimp, but use the spring ratchet crimper and then tape the join.

never had a failure of a connection, not once, ever.
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 08:26 AM
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I agree with Bob that the spring loaded ones work the best but they are too expensive for most of us to buy based on usage. Channelock makes a really good crimper for about $30 up here but it seems to work best with non insulated as Rick suggests. The heat shrink and possibly even some liquid electrical tape on the joint make a connection that is more water and corrosion resistant.The insulated type don't seem to hold on to the wires as well as just the bare sleeves and I have added solder to the insulated ones to make sure they hold.

The wiring harness should have come with a wiring diagram showing which colour wires connect to what as it is standardized so that you can hook onto anything with that type plug without having to rewire anything. If you don't have the diagram then google it so that you do it the right way.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 08:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
wow, having a named brand of connectors is a step too far for me (g).

If I'm wiring motorcycles or cars and its going to be there for the life of the vehicle, I always slide heat shrink on first, then twist the wires together and solder. Then a put a dab of silicone on the joint itself, then heat shrink till silicone is spread all the way along.
If I know it will be removed in the near future, and its a pain getting the soldering gear out for 2 joints, then I'll crimp, but use the spring ratchet crimper and then tape the join.

never had a failure of a connection, not once, ever.
Same here Bob . Rewired my 84 gmc trucks power windows with heavier gauge wiring and the guy at the glass shop said , wow those are the fastest windows I've ever seen on that generation of truck .
Never failed because I used good connectors ,and this is a circumstance where there's a lot of vibration.
The bad thing is , Thomas & betts crimp rings connectors etc , are a buck a piece here in Canada

I don’t always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by TheCableGuy View Post
Same here Bob . Rewired my 84 gmc trucks power windows with heavier gauge wiring and the guy at the glass shop said , wow those are the fastest windows I've ever seen on that generation of truck .
Never failed because I used good connectors ,and this is a circumstance where there's a lot of vibration.
The bad thing is , Thomas & betts crimp rings connectors etc , are a buck a piece here in Canada
Really, is a buck such a bad price to pay for a little safety?

The one thing that is always troublesome to track down is a wiring issue. Going through the same thing on a double axle trailer right now. So I have bought a brand new harness and will throw out the old one. Just not worth the aggravation.

OK, fess up...which one of you clowns stole my sig? It was right here a second ago.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 09:08 AM
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Despite having the best tooling money can buy (our money!), NASA solders all connections on space equipment.
I like to do a cheap crimp to hold things in place and then solder the connection. The new (at least to me) adhesive lined heat shrink tubing does a great job of sealing the joint on ring and fork type connectors. However, if you are insulating a spade or push on connector it will gum up the works so then the old style, plain tubing is the way to go. Liquid 'Lectric Tape works quite well, but is sure messy, I always manage to get it somewhere I didn't want it.
Having been a HAM radio operator as a kid, I love to solder so it is therapeutic for me!
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-02-2016, 09:44 AM
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why not just use a wiring harnesss tap...

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