Tips For Beginner Woodworkers Just Getting Started - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-23-2019, 06:56 AM
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As Tom said buy a good table saw. Without a table saw you're not going to get much done. You don't have to spend a fortune. A Craftsman a cast iron saw from the 70's or 80's can be had for under $200 and will outlast most of today's $700 saws. Once you get established buy the biggest most powerful one that you can afford. Powermatic comes to mind. And last don't try to make do using a tool for something it wasn't designed for. The router is the biggest offender in this category. But the correct tool and you'll won't struggle in the future.
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-23-2019, 05:41 PM
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There's a song about that, Vince!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK0P1Bk8Cx4
Good catch Dan - from the movie "Top Gun"

Some folks call me Vince - other folks call me...........
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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-23-2019, 06:38 PM
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When using, especially when first using, power tools, keep your hands and body parts far away from the spinny sharp things. If you find yourself doing something that gets your hands, etc. closer than that, to STOP, and find another way. My uncle taught me to stay at least 6" away from spinning saw blades, router bits, etc. and to use wooden clamps and other tools to hold the part while I drill, rout, saw, etc. so I can do what I want without putting myself in harms way. He taught me this when first teaching me how to use a table saw safely at the age of 8.

I'm 77 now and I still have all 10 fingers and no blade or bit scars. I've managed to injure myself many other ways in my life, and I do tend to leave a little blood mark, usually from a splinter, on almost everything that I've ever built of any size, but fortunately, these have all been little injuries. In other endeavors, like firefighting, I have not done so well.

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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-23-2019, 06:48 PM
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If your short term memory isn't so good, get a tape measure with a writable surface on the side of it, or keep some wood scraps nearby, so you can write down measurements using a pencil. It can save a lot of wood by helping you remember the correct measurements. Here's one, but there are others https://www.amazon.com/Malco-T425WM-.../dp/B01B97OIVY.

A story stick can save a lot of wood if you will need to repeat a lot of measurements. It can be as simple as a long stick onto which you mark and make notes for every dimension that you will need to repeat many times. Carpenters of old days many times used story sticks more than rulers for things that they built.

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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-24-2019, 05:37 PM
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Check around for some friendly neighbors or wood shops that welcome visitors in for a chat. One can learn a lot over a cup or two of hot coffee and a few visits. Any community colleges in the area that offer intro to woodworking classes?

Pick a simple project and buy good tools to build it. If you are happy with the outcome step up the game and the tool chest.

It is a fun trip.

Jon
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-24-2019, 05:38 PM
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Check around for some friendly neighbors or wood shops that welcome visitors in for a chat. One can learn a lot over a cup or two of hot coffee and a few visits. Any community colleges in the area that offer intro to woodworking classes?

Pick a simple project and buy good tools to build it. If you are happy with the outcome step up the game and the tool chest.

It is Can and should be a fun trip.

Jon
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 11:13 AM
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You can find all kinds of woodworking how-to books used on Amazon. I also like to have some picture books of projects people have done. One of the things you get from perusing those project books is seeing something you didn't know about. For example, beading on an edge or face of a piece of furniture for decorative effect. Easy enough to do, but I never thought about such a technique on my own. I've found lots of good, used books for less than $6. Found a number of books on toys, wind powered whirligigs and whimsical projects that can produce really fun weekends and smiles on the faces of kids and even the wife.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 11:32 AM
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Get to know the people at woodworking and other stores. For example, my local Lowes and even Home Depot have a small cadre of very experienced people who are pleased to share their expertise. My Rockler store has several people who've spent decades making sawdust, and they enjoy answering questions.

Rockler has regular demonstrations on Saturday mornings. The most important aspect is getting to know some of the woodworkers there. For example, that's where I learned about the best wood sources in the area. It's a long trip for me to get there, but always a pleasure to visit and at least, fondle the nifty tools. The other woodworking stores have similar demonstrations, some host woodworking classes and clubs.

In our area, the woodworking group participate in the community college shop classes. Many have accumulated years of college credits taking those classes with chums. You can learn about such offerings by talking with folks at stores, including both staff and customers. Woodworkers are a pretty friendly lot.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 12:21 PM
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Don't be afraid to try something new.
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 10:46 PM
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You can find all kinds of woodworking how-to books used on Amazon. I also like to have some picture books of projects people have done. One of the things you get from perusing those project books is seeing something you didn't know about. For example, beading on an edge or face of a piece of furniture for decorative effect. Easy enough to do, but I never thought about such a technique on my own. I've found lots of good, used books for less than $6. Found a number of books on toys, wind powered whirligigs and whimsical projects that can produce really fun weekends and smiles on the faces of kids and even the wife.
I spent a number of years tracking down out of print, limited edition, and other books, on-line. Amazon was not my top choice. At one time I had a list of I think about 40 on-line used book sellers, and Amazon was not on the list. Yes, they have books, yes, they are handy, but not a site I used often. And when nowhere else had what I wanted, I would check eBay - got to check shipping there, some of the sellers seem to make their profit off of shipping charges. Actually, my first choice for used woodworking books is a good used bookstore. Had one in Raleigh I used to hit every time I was in Raleigh. I could sometimes pick up as new books for around $3-4 that were selling new in Barned and Noble for around $35 each. Often hit Barnes and Noble also, but not to buy, rather to look at specific books to see if they had information I wanted. Then I would buy the books on-line.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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