17 Things To Accelerate Your Learning Curve - Page 3 - Router Forums
 75Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 12:19 PM
Registered User
 
old coasty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Bob
Posts: 3,375
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
I
Thanks all for the nice comments. I like to post this for newbies from time to time, but I always warn you that you've maybe read it before.

Tom
It's so worthwhile to read periodically for refreshing memories that may fade and cause problems.
old coasty is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Lots of good information Tom. I whole heartedly agree that gathering as much information as possible leads to easier projects with better results. There is no substitute for practice on a project. I build a prototype from pine before working with more expensive wood. This shows you any unexpected problems with the design or methods you use. Better to screw up on inexpensive materials!
That's how I feel. I did find a book (used on Amazon of course) with all kinds of country projects in pine. Of course, some pine is better than others, Douglas Fir seems pretty good.

I've held off on really fine furniture projects because I just don't think I'm skilled enough to do it without screwing up hundreds of bucks worth of hardwood yet. But making it in pine first is a good idea.

I sure appreciate all the help you've given over the years!
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #23 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonHartropp View Post
Thanks Tom for compiling this wealth of advice.
Each tip is worth about four years of experience....
Simon
p.s. I may quote you when my Beloved & I are having our next latest & greatest 'discussion' about my keeping wood offcuts for sacrificial purposes.
Thanks for the feedback. I don't know about quoting me. i try to stay out of domestic incidents, although one day my wife looked in my shop and asked when i was going to start making money with all the stuff. I replied, "about the same time you start making money from all your quilting stuff." I figured it out once, I have just recently spent as much on tools as she has on quilting. Ever price a Babylock quilting machine? More than my table saw, jointer, planer and sliding miter combined!
Cricket likes this.
DesertRatTom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 12:53 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by forsey View Post
Great advice, thanks for sharing.
Hi, thanks and I hope it saves you some frustration. I remember getting so annoyed that things wouldn't be square, which is what prompted me to get that Wixey...although from time to time, I tried a little whiskey as well.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #25 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
+2...
Thanks James, from you that's a nice compliment. I admit, I stand in awe of you guys with all those years of experience under your belt. I've done a lot of home improvement stuff throughout my life, but only about 6-7 years of more serious woodwork.
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #26 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Web Shepherd View Post
Great article, Tom ~ I have a folder on my hard drive named after you ... "Desert Rat Tom".

Bob
Thanks Bob,

I was a newspaper man for a decade and do tend to write pretty comprehensive pieces. Just seems to me that it takes a bit to respond fully to some of the questions that come up. Fun to think of that folder name, the idea came to me one day when I looked in a mirror and thought that's how I look much of the time out here on the Mojave. Tom
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #27 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 01:09 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry747 View Post
Great write up Tom. When I read the reference to The Joint Book i did a little research on the Internet and Amazon seems to be the cheapest source. But I also found this reference to a very old book that's been reproduced on line: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21531...-h/21531-h.htm I'm easily distracted. Anyway, I'm thinking about a project that will use some basic mortise and tenon joinery so I clicked in the index on " The Mortise and Tenon Joint". After scrolling through several pages my eyes glazed over. I never imagined that there could be so many different types, and uses, of mortise and tenon joinery. I'll never again use the phrase "simple" when discussing a joint. What could be simpler than a half lap, right? Wrong! Dozens of variations on that one too.

So much to learn, so little time.
I know exactly how you feel. I'm 72, died and was revived on an airplane 18 months ago and a mild heart attack early this year. Feeling pretty energetic still (thanks to a stent), but it is clear that I will never master woodworking in whatever time I have left.

That joint book really inspires me, but I have learned only to look at what I want to make in it for the same reason, glazing over from too much information.

One project I've been thinking about is making a couple of sets worth of theater flats for the local playhouse, and it is all about lap joints. When I was a kid, we made these with 1/4 ply triangles on the corners and rails, but you couldn't fold them back on themselves that way when you hinged two flats together. With lap joints, you can. Not much room backstage for flats. Mine will have doors and windows, which will mean a bit more complex joinery for those pieces.

Tom
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #28 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 01:59 PM Thread Starter
Forum Contributor
 
DesertRatTom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Tom
Posts: 15,569
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry747 View Post
Great write up Tom. When I read the reference to The Joint Book i did a little research on the Internet and Amazon seems to be the cheapest source. But I also found this reference to a very old book that's been reproduced on line: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21531...-h/21531-h.htm I'm easily distracted. Anyway, I'm thinking about a project that will use some basic mortise and tenon joinery so I clicked in the index on " The Mortise and Tenon Joint". After scrolling through several pages my eyes glazed over. I never imagined that there could be so many different types, and uses, of mortise and tenon joinery. I'll never again use the phrase "simple" when discussing a joint. What could be simpler than a half lap, right? Wrong! Dozens of variations on that one too.

So much to learn, so little time.
The Joint Book has a LOT of clear, color illustrations, so it is much easier to follow than text. Tom
DesertRatTom is offline  
post #29 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 02:56 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Frank
Posts: 280
 
Default New to wood working, but trying to learn

I want to say to Tom, hope you are not offended by calling you Tom, as most the male cats I know are named Tom.

I would like to tell you Sir, these 17 or so tips, will prove very valuable to any person who is just starting out as I am. Now when your age diminishes your abilities such as sight and muscle movements we must find new and easier ways to get the job done. We need all the help we can get to learn as quickly as we can. Life and time does not stand still for any man. I am going to steal this information and add it to my new Woodworking File. And I want to say Thank You.
DesertRatTom likes this.

Tagwatts1 from Utah

Remember to eat your desert first as you may die before your food arrives.
Tagwatts1 is offline  
post #30 of 54 (permalink) Old 09-09-2015, 03:09 PM
Registered User
 
Garyk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Gary
Posts: 811
 
Default

Well thought out and excellent tips. This is great information for beginning woodworkers and us "seasoned" ones as well. I even like the order that you presented them in. I would loved to have had your list when I started woodworking a 100 years ago (seems like anyway). Well done.
DesertRatTom likes this.
Garyk is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
watching and learning lyle45859 New Member Introductions 3 04-16-2012 06:54 AM
Not your standard way of doing things... Soapdish Tools and Woodworking 3 01-29-2010 09:49 PM
New to routing. Like making things! tech406 New Member Introductions 4 02-21-2009 01:23 PM
andy van learning andy van New Member Introductions 3 11-29-2008 04:09 PM
A steep learning curve harrysin Woodturning and Lathes 18 03-18-2008 07:17 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome