Heat and Routing - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-14-2015, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Default Heat and Routing



One reason to make cuts in 1/4" passes is because smaller routers cannot handle the work load the big boys can. Another reason is to allow time to evacuate the chips. Plunge routers have turrets for controlled cut depths. 2-1/4 HP routers have enough power to make profile cuts with bits up to 1" diameter at full speed on most woods. This is the way to get the most efficient cut. The reason mortises are cut in stages is not because the router or bit cannot handle it, it is to allow time to remove the chips which retain heat. Moving your router (or your wood when table mounted) too slow causes heat buildup which results in burning. Listen to the voice of your router, it should slow down slightly when making a cut but if it bogs down you are moving too fast or making too big a cut.

Heat and Routing-100_1939.jpg

You are best off using the shortest bit that will do the job. Shorter bits are more stable than longer bits. Less mass = quicker cooling. Shorter bits also cost less. Keeping the bit sharp and free from the resins that build up during cutting also helps to keep your bit cooler. Heat kills bits, most people will have seen a HSS bit that has turned blue from overheating. Once this has happened the bit will not hold its edge for as long. In extreme situations over heating will weaken the braze that holds carbide tips to the router bit. Rust on a bit is about the same as adding sandpaper because it creates friction/heat. These are good reasons to use a bit cleaner. It only takes a couple minutes to maintain your bits and it pays big dividends in longer bit life and cleaner cuts.

Heat and Routing-100_1888.jpg

Router motors have cooling fans in them and running them at full speed results in the best cooling. Larger bits require slower speeds to get the most efficient cut; some woods cut better at lower speeds. In these situations you should run the router at full speed with no load to help cool it after making a couple of cuts. When you are done routing it is a good idea to unplug your router and blow it out with compressed air. This removes the buildup of fines that retain heat. Keeping your router motor cooler will extend its life.

Heat and Routing-stacc-vac-mr23.jpg

Using dust collection with your router does several things: evacuating the chips, reducing your clean up time and keeping your lungs healthy. The airflow over the bit also helps to cool it. With dust collection it is easier to see the cut as it is being made. Most current models now offer dust collection adapters and there are aftermarket options that work well too. With these benefits why would anyone not choose to use dust collection?

Mike
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Last edited by Cricket; 09-14-2015 at 09:43 PM.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-14-2015, 11:42 PM
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Excellent thread Mike.
+1

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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 03:32 AM
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good thread Mike...

but...

John (lead dog) at Bosch support says to vacuum out the router because compressed air forces swarf/fines into places that aren't good for it and could possibly cause issues/problems down the road...

just trying to bring this to the attention of the new guys/users and the ones that still believe that the compressor is the way to go...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 06:00 AM
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Little tips, precious results. Thanks Mike.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
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@Stick486
Marty, Ken Warneke was the head tech; both he and John are retired now.

Vacuuming the excess dust off the router is not a bad idea but it will not get the job done like using clean, dry compressed air. The concentrated stream from the safety blow gun pictured is far more efficient. I chose my old Rockwell router for this shot to help make the point of how this extends the routers life. You can tell by the corner snuggers that it is mounted on a Rousseau plate. The Rockwell has large case vents in the shaft end; table mounting this router ensures it will get a huge amount of swarf inside the case. Even if you were to disassemble the case a vacuum would not do as good a job of removing the swarf as compressed air. This is the time proven method of electric motor re builders and heavy industrial maintenance.

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Last edited by Mike; 09-15-2015 at 09:17 AM.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 09:20 AM
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@Mike ..
John at Bosch that has been there for decades??? Just spoke w/ him a week or two ago trying to help out a member...

I asked the compressed air question directly and vacuum was the answer....
other than that.. DIIK....

another point, not everyone has dry clean compressed air....

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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Last edited by Stick486; 09-15-2015 at 09:27 AM.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 09:37 AM Thread Starter
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Every shop should have an air compressor and inline filters are very inexpensive. These can be found at auto paint stores and tool stores. For those who do not have a compressor small cans are available at any office supply store.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Every shop should have an air compressor and inline filters are very inexpensive. These can be found at auto paint stores and tool stores. For those who do not have a compressor small cans are available at any office supply store.
grant you that...
southern climes and rainy locals virtually demand in line dryers
how many don't even drain their compressors...
VOE says the inexpensive aka cheep dryers aren't all that great...

those air cans aren't air... and it's flammable...
I'd never even consider using them let alone suggest their use....
forbid if someone should air their tool while it was running or injected the liquid into their router.. WHEW!!!!!
way too many things to go really wrong....

Ingredients
1,1-DIFLUOROETHANE
ETHYL ALCOHOL
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 3MDustRemoverAv152aMSDS.pdf (57.4 KB, 399 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 01:47 PM
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Very interesting discussion here.

We, woodworkers are everywhere!!!
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 09-15-2015, 02:31 PM
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News to me, I been blowing out tools for 30 years with no problems. I do not see how a vac can do as good a job, the compressed air can get where no vac can. Sorry to say just because some guy at Bosch says so really does not make it true. I mean what kind of testing was done with vacs and compressors for some one to have data to say this.
I think I will keep using my compressed air.
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