Names for common solvents - American/British English translations - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-16-2012, 05:17 AM Thread Starter
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Default Names for common solvents - American/British English translations

Just following on from the thread on denatured alcohol, I thought I would post my list of translations between the US names and UK names for common solvents. I think many other English-speaking countries use some of the British names too. Exact formulations may vary from country to country. Please add any I've missed:

Denatured alcohol = methylated spirit / meths
Mineral spirits = white spirit
Mineral oil = liquid paraffin B.P.
Kerosene = paraffin / paraffin oil
Naphtha / white gas / Coleman fuel = lighter fluid / lighter fuel
Gas / gasoline = petrol
Rubbing alcohol = surgical spirit
Trisodium phosphate = sugar soap


If anyone knows of a similar list for adhesives I'd very much like to know about it. American plans or how-tos often call for a brand-named glue that we don't have here... e.g. I have no idea what the difference is between "white glue" and "yellow glue" - all our PVAs and wood glues are white!

Last edited by AndyL; 08-17-2012 at 08:20 AM.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-16-2012, 11:59 AM
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Andy; on the "Naphtha" item, in spite of it being named that here in NA, I don't think I've ever heard anybody actually call it that(?). I'm pretty sure it's what we used to call 'white gas' or Coleman fuel. Anybody confirm this? I'm pretty sure Coleman stoves would burn normal unleaded gasoline but I haven't had the nerve to try it.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-16-2012, 12:07 PM
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you would be nuts to put unleaded gasoline in your Coleman stove, white gas is not the same as gasoline

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphthalene


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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-16-2012, 12:12 PM
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Yeh, kind of why I haven't tried it! Funny though, as many people as I've asked, nobody has ever given me a definitive answer, and what the actual difference is(?).
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 08:24 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Dan, I added white gas and Coleman fuel to the original post for reference. Naphtha is a term I knew from reading old issues of American Woodworker.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 09:22 AM
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I'm not familiar with naphtha, but back in the days when almost all gasoline had lead added to it, AMOCO sold a gasoline that didn't have any lead added to it and it was called white gas.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 11:04 AM
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Thanks, Jim; see, I'm not senile! And that is why I was tempted (but resisted)...
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 01:21 PM
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"If anyone knows of a similar list for adhesives I'd very much like to know about it. American plans or how-tos often call for a brand-named glue that we don't have here... e.g. I have no idea what the difference is between "white glue" and "yellow glue" - all our PVAs and wood glues are white!"
-Andy

"Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) Glue
Any glue consisting primarily of polyvinyl acetate polymer. This category
includes most traditional white glues and more advanced yellow aliphatic resin
glues. Although PVA glues can vary in strength, flexibility, water-resistance and
sandability, they offer good performance, cleanup with water and are non-toxic.
Because PVA glues tend to “creep”, or slowly stretch under long-term loads,
they are not recommended for structural applications."
From Titebond's website
Titebond - News Article > Need technical assistance?
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 01:24 PM
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Inquiring mind needed to know (more)...
Aliphatic Resin Glue | New To Woodworking
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-17-2012, 01:44 PM
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Seems to be a pretty good reference type of snapshot, to look at them together and see the uses, pros and cons of each:

Wood glue - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Note that some glues are considered as cross-overs between groups (such as titebond II and others)... But that list has the basic types.

EDIT-- Looking into that closer, that list I posted seems incomplete...

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 08-17-2012 at 02:32 PM.
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