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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-18-2013, 11:19 PM Thread Starter
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Default Paint Stripper Input Wanted

OK, I've got three gunstocks that need refinishing. So, I will need to strip the old finish off. It's been probably going on 40 years since I used any paint stripper, and looking around, I am definitely confused on what to use. I do NOT want anything that will melt my eyeballs at 10 paces, eat my skin off, or make me have to wear a protective suit, mask, and gloves. I want to keep it as simple as possible.

I've been doing a 'lot' of searching and this seems to pretty much be what I'm looking for. EcoSolve Americas
But before I spring for any, I want to know first if anyone here has tried it, and what their comments on it are; I don't mind waiting a day or so for results - better that then something fast that eats my finger prints off.
Or, if anyone has any other suggestions.

Yes, I could sand the finishes off, but do not want to do that. There is just so much new stuff out there, I don't really know what to go with; and some of that stuff is really scary.

Thanks.

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-19-2013, 12:15 PM
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Theo; when I have something large or intricate I send it out to the guys with the dip tanks; better them than me!
I also tend to use a heat gun to get the bulk of the goop off, before using chemicals if I'm doing it myself.
paint stripping - YouTube
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-19-2013, 02:53 PM
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Sorrry, I use BIX Varnish and Stain Stripper. It says on the label "Gentle"... but it's some pretty nasty aggressive stuff. I think they really meant gentle on wood <> caustic to people.

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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-19-2013, 04:32 PM
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On the subject of paint removal, does anyone have information or know of a source of info regading removal of modern paint(s) from an old (ca 1700s) Scandinavian trunk having original stylized painting which I wish to preserve.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-20-2013, 12:10 PM
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In the last 40 years I have used many different paint strippers, some good same bad some too thin some too thick and some that would eat anything that it touched. In the last ten to fifteen years I have settled on a product called Citristrip. I have used it on all types of furnitue that date from a 100 years old to today. I keep a quart in my shop and use it often

If I were to decide to refinish my rifle stocks it would be the product I would use. Apply acording to directions and let it set until you see the old finish bubbling up, take a handful of sawdust or wood shavings (wear gloves) and rub the gunk off the stock, if you have a checkered stock use an old toothbrush to scrub the checking. A second application won't hurt if it is needed in some heavy spot I keep a bag of sawdust around just for that purpose, it soaks up the gunk and helps dry up the wood.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-20-2013, 03:31 PM
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I've only ever heard good things about Citristrip; gotta get me some and try it!
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-21-2013, 06:36 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
Theo; when I have something large or intricate I send it out to the guys with the dip tanks; better them than me!
I also tend to use a heat gun to get the bulk of the goop off, before using chemicals if I'm doing it myself.
paint stripping - YouTube
Thanks, but even if I were inclined to go that route, I don't think it would be cost effective, not for three gunstocks.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Fawkahwe tribal police SWAT Team
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-21-2013, 06:42 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikelley View Post
On the subject of paint removal, does anyone have information or know of a source of info regading removal of modern paint(s) from an old (ca 1700s) Scandinavian trunk having original stylized painting which I wish to preserve.
Not really, but from what I've seen on some of those shows on the History Channel, of them restoring old painting and such, it is probably not something that the average do it yourself guy is gonna want to tackle, and expect success. I'd suggest doing a LOT of researching on the subject. Then if you decide you want to try it after all, I'd suggest some out of the way place on the trunk, and try it on a small spot that won't be noticed if you screw it up. Check on baking soda blasting too, that is capable of delicate results, but don't know if it's been tried on projects like you're suggesting, but I have seen one layer of paint taken off at a time with it - again, probably not do it yourself. Good luck.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Fawkahwe tribal police SWAT Team
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-21-2013, 06:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hal View Post
In the last 40 years I have used many different paint strippers, some good same bad some too thin some too thick and some that would eat anything that it touched. In the last ten to fifteen years I have settled on a product called Citristrip. I have used it on all types of furnitue that date from a 100 years old to today. I keep a quart in my shop and use it often

If I were to decide to refinish my rifle stocks it would be the product I would use. Apply acording to directions and let it set until you see the old finish bubbling up, take a handful of sawdust or wood shavings (wear gloves) and rub the gunk off the stock, if you have a checkered stock use an old toothbrush to scrub the checking. A second application won't hurt if it is needed in some heavy spot I keep a bag of sawdust around just for that purpose, it soaks up the gunk and helps dry up the wood.
I just did a bit of on-line checking on Citristrip, and it definitely sounds like some reasonable stuff to use. Next time I'm out and about I'll try to find some.
Thanks.

"It ain't what you're told, it's what you know." - Granny Weatherwax
Fawkahwe tribal police SWAT Team
Some days, the supply of available curse words is insufficient to meet my demands.
.....Call me a craftsman, artisan, or artistic, and I will accept that. Call me an artist and you will likely get a quite rude comment in return. I am not a @#$%ing artist.
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