most accurate walnut look, that isn't walnut - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-05-2015, 04:12 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Country: United States
First Name: walker
Posts: 56
 
Default most accurate walnut look, that isn't walnut

I'm always scheming for future projects. Thinking of ideas, researching techniques, making lists, buying tools I don't really need (yet), etc. On the list of future projects is a kitchen island/cart with butcher block top. The top will consist of the standard maple and walnut edgegrain construction common for butcher blocks.

The rest of the unit will consist of leg posts, shelves, and cabinets. Making the entire thing from solid walnut would be very expensive. So to keep costs down I'd like to use some cheaper materials and stain/paint/oil to match the look of the walnut.

So here's the big question...what is the best combination of material and finish to accurately fake walnut, without breaking the bank? could be birch with general finishes antique walnut gel stain, home depot pine with Watco Walnut danish oil, hardboard with brown fingerpaint, osb with a picture of a walnut taped to it, etc.

What have you used? What works what well and what completely failed? Side by side pics with actual Walnut would be excellent.
walkerrosewood is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-05-2015, 04:26 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 28,923
 
Default

alder is about as close as you will ever get to a walnut look alike...
red Gum could be another...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-05-2015, 04:57 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 28,923
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by walkerrosewood View Post
What have you used? What works what well and what completely failed? Side by side pics with actual Walnut would be excellent.
I don't substitute so failing is held to an absolute minimum....
a sub for walnut may be okay come molding/trim, furniture, cabinets and the like...
for a cutting board.. not so well unless it's ornamental and not functional....
Since you didn't specify which subspecies of walnut just tried for an average..

Alder is very soft and not like walnut in molecular structure at all...
Red Gum is often sap wood and porous..
Walnut and Maple are similar... where as Alder and gum are similar..
Neither group is like or similar to the other...

Maple...
Workability: Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Average Dried Weight: 44 lbs/ft3 (705 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .56, .71
Janka Hardness: 1,450 lbf (6,450 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 15,800 lbf/in2 (109.0 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,830,000 lbf/in2 (12.62 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 7,830 lbf/in2 (54.0 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 4.8%, Tangential: 9.9%, Volumetric: 14.7%, T/R Ratio: 2.1

Walnut...
Workability: Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Planer tearout can sometimes be a problem when surfacing pieces with irregular or figured grain. Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained). Responds well to steam bending.

Average Dried Weight: 38 lbs/ft3 (610 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .51, .61
Janka Hardness: 1,010 lbf (4,490 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 14,600 lbf/in2 (100.7 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,680,000 lbf/in2 (11.59 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 7,580 lbf/in2 (52.3 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 5.5%, Tangential: 7.8%, Volumetric: 12.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.4

Alder...
Workability: Red Alder is very easy to work with both hand and machine tools; it sands especially easy. The wood is rather soft, however, and care must be taken to avoid denting it in some applications. Red Alder has excellent gluing, staining, and finishing properties; it also turns well and behaves similar to Black Cherry.

Average Dried Weight: 28 lbs/ft3 (450 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .37, .45
Janka Hardness: 590 lbf (2,620 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 9,800 lbf/in2 (67.6 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,380,000 lbf/in2 (9.52 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 5,820 lbf/in2 (40.1 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 4.4%, Tangential: 7.3%, Volumetric: 12.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.7

Red Gum...
Workability: Red Gum Generally easy to work, though planing can produce tearout due to interlocked grain. Sweetgum is known to warp and distort badly during initial drying. (After initial drying, distortion is significantly less, but the wood still experiences an appreciable amount of movement in service.) Turns, glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds moderately well to steam bending.

Average Dried Weight: 34 lbs/ft3 (545 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .46, .55
Janka Hardness: 850 lbf (3,780 N)
Modulus of Rupture: 12,500 lbf/in2 (86.2 MPa)
Elastic Modulus: 1,640,000 lbf/in2 (11.31 GPa)
Crushing Strength: 6,320 lbf/in2 (43.6 MPa)
Shrinkage: Radial: 5.3%, Tangential: 10.2%, Volumetric: 15.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.9
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Wood Look-Alikes.pdf (115.8 KB, 136 views)

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 02-05-2015 at 06:14 PM.
Stick486 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-05-2015, 05:59 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Ray
Posts: 590
 
Default

Great info & pics stick, thanks.

Copyright©2015 A.D. (Anno Domini, Latin for "in the year of our Lord") e.g., historical FACT!

Life is a comedy for those who think, but a tragedy for those who feel.

Let your smile change the world. Don’t let the world change your smile.
RMIGHTY1 is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 12:09 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Country: United States
First Name: walker
Posts: 56
 
Default

Thanks Stick, that document was very helpful! Just to be clear, the butch block top I would make from real Walnut. It's the cabinet base and leg posts I'm looking to find a cheaper Walnut analogue.
walkerrosewood is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 04:36 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Phillip
Posts: 251
 
Default

You can make the cabinet base from cabinet-grade plywood covered in walnut veneer. You can buy veneer in a roll with a peel-off backing.

You might want to consider splurging on real walnut legs. This may depend on the profile you select for legs. Are you turning the legs? Or will the legs with dense square stock? If the legs will be square stock, you can buy just a small bit of walnut to make your own veneer for the legs. You could also purchase the veneer as before and simply cover the legs.

To change the world, change your mind.
phillipdanbury is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 06:46 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Country: United States
First Name: walker
Posts: 56
 
Default

I didn't even think about veneer. I've never done veneer, but that hasn't stopped me before. Could be something fun to try.

Some of the leg will be exposed, the cabinet will wrap around the rest.
walkerrosewood is offline  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 07:00 PM
Retired Moderator
 
TwoSkies57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 6,028
   
Default

I'd suggest staying away from veneers for anything that is in all likely hood going to get dinged, banged, thumped, hit, brushed against, ran into or otherwise subject to everyday life. Store bought veneer ply can be damn near as expense as the real deal if not more. Learning to do your own is definitely worth the time looking into.

"..... limited only by imagination"

"Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"
Skipper the Penguin
TwoSkies57 is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 07:01 PM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 28,923
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoSkies57 View Post
I'd suggest staying away from veneers for anything that is in all likely hood going to get dinged, banged, thumped, hit, brushed against, ran into or otherwise subject to everyday life. Store bought veneer ply can be damn near as expense as the real deal if not more. Learning to do your own is definitely worth the time looking into.
agreed.....

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 02-06-2015, 07:06 PM
Retired Moderator
 
TwoSkies57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 6,028
   
Default

Butternut is of the walnut family, though not nearly as hard it does work and stain well. Grain tends to be less dramatic in most cases. Comparatively affordable when compared to walnut (at least in most places).. Where walnut tends to be a darker brown, butternut tends to be a lighter brown..

"..... limited only by imagination"

"Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"
Skipper the Penguin

Last edited by TwoSkies57; 02-06-2015 at 07:21 PM.
TwoSkies57 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Picked up some Walnut today greenacres2 Lobby 5 10-23-2014 07:46 PM
How long to dry walnut 2walnuts Tools and Woodworking 10 10-07-2014 07:01 AM
Cherry, Maple, & Walnut end tables Knot working Show N' Tell 18 10-28-2013 06:48 PM
Zebrawood / Walnut Box Build Along¯ Nickbee Show N' Tell 39 06-21-2009 07:18 PM
Walnut Burl Veneer… What kind of glue? Nickbee Tools and Woodworking 7 01-19-2008 09:56 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome