Attaching trim to bookcase sides - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 07:46 PM Thread Starter
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Default Attaching trim to bookcase sides

I am building a bookcase and will be using dados for the shelves. I plan to use trim to cover up the dados afterwards. What would be the best way to attach the trim? Would glue be enough?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 08:23 PM
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Rob I am sure someone will be along to help.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 09:14 PM
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Originally Posted by WoodCrusher View Post
I am building a bookcase and will be using dados for the shelves. I plan to use trim to cover up the dados afterwards. What would be the best way to attach the trim? Would glue be enough?
yes.. a 23ga pinner would be a plus...

Grex Power Tools - 23 Gauge Headless Pinners

would iron on banding work for you???

Iron on Edge Banding Application Instructions by WiseWood Veneer.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-10-2015, 10:48 PM
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I'll offer you another option. A dado joint is for all purposes a mortise and tenon joint. What the pros would do is to take the shelf and trim the ends down thickness wise just a bit to form a true tenon. Then instead of continuing the dado to the edge you stop it just short. Then you trim the tenon back from the front edge of the shelf enough to fit into into the stopped dado (or groove). Doing it this way avoids the groove showing at the front edge and by making the tenon slightly narrower than the thickness of the shelf hides the groove cut into the sides. It is a bit more complex and time consuming but not really a lot more difficult to do. When you make the tenon using this method it should be ever so slightly shorter than the depth of the groove to make sure it works out right.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 08:24 AM
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Now this sounds like a very good idea. May be a little more labor and time intensive but the end should work out very nice. Good one Charles

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 08:39 AM
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I see no problem in simply gluing the trim on. I've glued edge banding on book cases that are now 30+ years old and there hasn't been a problem.

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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 11:06 AM
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Charles; yes, but...
That doesn't actually address the issue of covering up the edge view of the plywood gables (assuming they're plywood).
It also doesn't help with covering the joints between individual units in a bank of bookcases. Neither does taping the edges.
My personal preference is to treat bookcases like bookcases; vertical channels with inset pilasters...easily adjustable to accommodate different ht. books.
It could be suggested that they're not 'elegant' enough, but I take the Architects' view, "Form follows function". It doesn't get more functional than pilasters and clips...also available in brass.
5/8" U-Shaped Aluminum Pilaster - 2551096 - Richelieu Hardware

That doesn't really answer your edge trim question though.
I use solid wood, in my case, the thickness of the gable(s) plus an 1/8" overhang on both sides X 3/8" to 1/2" thick, glued and pinned as per Stick's comment.
Use a furniture filler crayon to fill the almost invisible hole if you like.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 02:13 PM
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I agree with you Dan, they are very functional. They are a perfect match for veneer covered, edge banded particle board.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 02:52 PM
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Ouch!
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-11-2015, 05:04 PM
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Thought I would give you a hard time in return.

You are probably right that he is using plywood and my suggestion for stopped grooves is for solid wood. Tenoning the ends of the shelves and using the shoulder to hide the grooves will give it a cleaner look though, unless you convinced him to go with your method.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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