How to dress up columns - Router Forums
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post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 12:53 PM Thread Starter
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Default How to dress up columns

I want to make a pine TV stand with vertical posts holding up the levels. I'd like to dress them up a bit and thought of putting a stopped cove in the edges like in the drawing. I tried it on a scrap and wasn't exactly pleased with the result... tearout etc. Has anyone got some tips they'd like to share?
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post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 01:33 PM
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If the tearout is at the right end of the cut (feeding left to right), start at the right end of the cut and climb cut the first inch or so and then go back to the other end and cut the whole length, and maybe take several smaller cuts.
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post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 02:54 PM
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I want to make a pine TV stand with vertical posts holding up the levels. I'd like to dress them up a bit and thought of putting a stopped cove in the edges like in the drawing. I tried it on a scrap and wasn't exactly pleased with the result... tearout etc. Has anyone got some tips they'd like to share?
With pine just go slowly , increasing depth on each pass. If problem is at end of each cut then use a forstner bit to cut clean edges.
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post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 08:30 PM
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Paying attention to the grain pattern on the material to be purchased is the beginning of the job. The pic cut direction will minimize or eliminate chipping, you can do a small test to prove, if the pine is too dry/brittle you can scalp the end cut 1st, remove the majority of the mat with a chisel, spoke shave or draw knife then run the router over it.

If the mat is overly brittle maybe do it on the RT (instead of handheld with an attached fence) and apply pressure to the mat against the fence and positive stops will also limit tearout.
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post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 09:10 PM
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A 45 deg miter bearing bit at progressively deeper settings for each pass to keep from chipping, will give you good results, if you just want a 45 deg bevel. Climb cutting a short distance at the opposite end before cutting the bulk of it will help too. I've made edges like this colonial signs and sign posts using this method with excellent results, but usually used a spoke shave at the ends to produce a lead in and lead out bevel longer than the curve produced by the miter bit. If you want the long lead in and out, cut the straight part of the bevel first, then just match the bevel angle as you use the spoke shave to make the desired lead in and lead out ends

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post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 09:48 PM
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Paul I kinda like the minimalistic look . I can't find the guys site to save my life , but here's what he builds out of solid pine . I want to do something simular someday , but have differant heights on the shelves to accommodate differant components.

I think I'd prefer to have all the shelves flush with the posts to
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post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-15-2016, 09:53 PM
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Ok found it hiding in my favorites . Thought I'd post this so you may get some ideas.
This guy does some nice work IMO

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post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-16-2016, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
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Paul I kinda like the minimalistic look . I can't find the guys site to save my life , but here's what he builds out of solid pine . I want to do something simular someday , but have differant heights on the shelves to accommodate differant components.

I think I'd prefer to have all the shelves flush with the posts to
I usually do keep it simple but in my living room I have more ornate old tables etc. That's why I wanted to add a little something to spruce the project up.
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post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-16-2016, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
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I like the look of a cove and it works fine except at the end of the cut. I tried doing it in a couple of passes and climbing on the end of the cut but there's no support at all on the table when at the end. I'm thinking I might have to try making a jig which will hold the piece at a 45 and support the end of the cut (Zero clearance style). I need 8 pieces for this project alone, so it might be worth making something up. Maybe cut a V groove in a 2 by 4 as the 'carrier' and then route through it, except near the ends. Easier for me to visualize than to verbalize.
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post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-16-2016, 08:17 PM
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Do as said about climb cutting the end the end first. If you are using a straight bit at 45* angle then it is easy to use a drill mounted sanding drum to touch the cut up.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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