HELP! Jig for lap joints on end of boards? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
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Default HELP! Jig for lap joints on end of boards?

Hi, getting set up to make theatrical flats that depend on lap joints. Dimensions are 4' by 10', with a crossbar top, bottom and two evenly spaced the length of the flat. The rails and styles are all 3.5 to 4 inches, depending on what I can find that's relatively straight.

Window and door flats are a little different and rely on bottom steel braces to hold their shape. All possible joints will be lap joints.

That said, I need to build a jig that will fit over the end of the stiles. Any suggestions on how to make this. The lap joints on the other rails are pretty obvious. All lap joints must be an exact fit.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 07:50 PM
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table saw and a dado blade..
ball roller stands for material support...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 08:07 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
table saw and a dado blade..
ball roller stands for material support...
Not workable in my small shop. Pretty much has to be a router. Wondering whether the side rails of the jig need to b adjustable to fit the 3.5 inch stock width, or whether I can just snug the jig up to one edge of the 10 ft rail. Maybe make a small jig just large enought to stabilize the router over the jig.

I can see it will be easy to handle the jig for the middle of the styles, but all joints will have to be right on ends. In other words, how can I build a jig to cut the ends?

I found a video where the set builder cut across the rail with a hand saw, then used a router freehand to remove the rest. I am not so sure I can hold the router staady enough to make that work. Your thoughts?

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 08:23 PM
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okay...
so use Oliver's jig...

.
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”

Last edited by Stick486; 11-06-2016 at 08:26 PM.
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 08:28 PM
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Just a right angle jig with a strong back. Like this.
Use a spacer or the stock itself to position the the jig. Add some for the offset in the collar.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 09:57 PM
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@Desertrat Tom

You don't say what thickness material you'll be using, but even 1X will require a couple of passes with a router. Or how many pieces you'll need to cut. As we're probably not talking super precision, I'd look at using a circular saw set to half the thickness, and cut multiple kerfs along the joint and then knock out the pieces with a hammer.

I had to make a new door for my shed - the new grass catcher on the riding mower was less than 1" narrower than the old opening. I removed one stud and reframed the opening and made a new door to suit. The original doors were made of 2X material with half lap joints at the corners and at the center rail. I used a CS with the Kreg cross cut joint and had all 12 joints cut and fitted in a little over an hour. Left about a blade thickness of material between each kerf and then just smacked it with a hammer. A couple of swipes with a block plane cleaned the faces up well enough and I put the frame together with construction adhesive and deck screws.

The original shed is about 25 years old and the door has held up OK so no reason that the new one won't.

It would probably be quicker with one of the newer sliding miter saws where you can lock down the blade at a set height above the table but I don't have one of those, the CS worked pretty good and was the way that I'd built the original doors.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-06-2016, 10:54 PM
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Do you know someone who has a now "obsolete" RAS -- radial arm saw? A stop block, sharp dado head cutter, and a RAS set to cut the correct depth would make short work cutting half laps. Gang up several boards with a few nails and pieces of scrap and the work will go quicker.


Last edited by Ray Newman; 11-06-2016 at 10:57 PM.
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 12:47 AM
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Use a guide similar to the one in this link http://cdn1.tmbi.com/TFH/Projects/FH08OCT_SAWGUI_01.JPG . Use about 1/4 to 3/8 material for the base and leave it long enough so that you cut the edge off on the very first pass. That shows the cut line for every cut after that. Take a short piece of the material you want to lap and scribe (not pencil) lines down the edges when it is 90* to the piece you want the lap on. You can add a cleat to the piece to automatically register it at 90* and that would be faster.

Once the lines are scribed use the cutting guide to cut one line and then flip it around and cut to the other line. Then just hog out the waste in the middle working from one end to the other.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 06:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillman View Post
Just a right angle jig with a strong back. Like this.
Use a spacer or the stock itself to position the the jig. Add some for the offset in the collar.
Pat,

That is a great looking jig, simple and effective.

Doug
1 John 1:9
Fredericksburg, VA




http://disasterreliefeffort.org/
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-07-2016, 06:35 AM
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