Preparing stock, routing Walnut - Router Forums
 22Likes
  • 12 Post By difalkner
  • 1 Post By jj777746
  • 1 Post By mgmine
  • 1 Post By Knothead47
  • 1 Post By Roy Drake
  • 2 Post By vchiarelli
  • 3 Post By difalkner
  • 1 Post By mgmine
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-05-2016, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
Moderation Team
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: David
Posts: 3,121
 
Default Preparing stock, routing Walnut

A local trophy shop asked me today to make four simple pieces in Walnut, 4" x 28" and with a Roman Ogee edge profile. I'll be doing some CNC work for them and have the Walnut ready for the upcoming jobs but they needed these four pieces right away. This is some of the Walnut I helped mill back in mid October Sawing Walnut Logs and posted here. This is some gorgeous unsteamed Walnut!

For those who don't do this I thought it would be good to just post the steps. My reasoning is that I often get asked by friends why my projects end up looking different from theirs and this is one of the reasons - properly milled stock to start a project. These boards are in the rough so that means ripping and crosscutting to size, of course, but the next steps are where the difference comes in for a better end result - YMMV.

My steps for this -
  • Crosscut to a half inch over length
  • Rip to a quarter inch over width
  • Pick a good edge and straighten on the jointer
  • Determine face to show, flatten on the jointer to remove cupping, bowing, etc.
  • Once that is flat then surface the other side in the planer (face jointed side down)
  • When that side is cleaned up surface the reference face one time in the planer
  • Sand both sides with drum sander to remove any marks (optional)
  • Rip to exact width using the jointed edge against the table saw fence
  • Crosscut to final length using a stop so all pieces are exact

Many of you know this already but I remember when this would have been news to me and helpful to learn why my projects didn't turn out like some I had seen. So feel free to chime in with your steps to prepare stock especially if they're different than mine.

Anyway, doing those steps produces pieces that are perfectly flat, square, and exactly the same and they look like this -


And I have to add that even though I might have just built an awesome CNC router machine there are still times when a good ol' router table is best, like using a Roman Ogee bearing bit. Fortunately I have a portable router table and a very small place to set it up at the end of the CNC machine and I had forgotten just how much of a mess this makes! Walnut everywhere even though my makeshift dust collection was catching about half! LOL!


But the boards are cut and waiting for lacquer tomorrow. I put a little Naphtha on one spot to see the color and it is purty!
kp91, Arcola60, paduke and 9 others like this.

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 02:33 AM
Registered User
 
jj777746's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 4,727
 
Default

Hi David, thank you for the advice & pictures re that beautiful Walnut timber.I once made a stock for one of my rifles out of white beech (experiment) but I can see why Walnut is the preferred wood for guns.James jj777746
difalkner likes this.

You can't drive a bridge spike with a tack hammer(so I'm told)
jj777746 is online now  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 08:20 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Art
Posts: 1,528
 
Default

What works for me is to cut it a little longer so in case there is snipe I can cut it off. For the edges I simply but a stack of them on their edge through the planer. I have found that doing each one on the jointer creates problems with having to do each one the same number of time and increases the risk of error.
difalkner likes this.
mgmine is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 08:54 AM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

Nice looking wood and finished product.
James, walnut is great for gunstocks as it is not only attractive but strong. I have read where the old time gun makers used cherry, maple, and other woods for the muzzleloaders of the time.
difalkner likes this.

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 12:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Roy
Posts: 875
 
Default

Thanks, David. A worthwhile refresher.
difalkner likes this.
Roy Drake is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 03:14 PM Thread Starter
Moderation Team
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: David
Posts: 3,121
 
Default

Minor update - they called and wanted 10 more! It took several hours to prepare these for the next step, routing the Roman Ogee edge. But first I need to make a quick dust chute to catch some of the shavings so I don't have the mess I had when I did the first four.

Also, I didn't like the way the lacquer went on for the first four so I 'stripped' the lacquer off the top (ran it back through the planer for a 'quick strip' job - LOL!).

On another note, I've had a few people ask me why I used the jointer to flatten the face of one side of each board so I thought now would be a good time to throw that in. Again, old news to most of you but there was a time when I didn't do this but also didn't know how it factors into achieving a flat board.

If a board has cup/twist/bow in it the planer will definitely make one or both sides smooth but the board will cup/twist/bow right back into that shape as soon as it comes out of the planer. The planer feed rollers press down hard enough to take that out of the board right at the cutterhead but only while the board is going through the planer. When you flatten one side with a jointer you can't push down hard enough to take that cup/twist/bow out of the board (at least nobody I know can do that). Repeated passes take more and more of the cup/twist/bow out of the board until that one side is flat. Now when you run it through the planer, good side away from the cutterhead, you'll end up with not only two sides flat but also parallel and coplanar to each other.

So here's the stack ready for the router -

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 03:42 PM
Registered User
 
vchiarelli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Vince
Posts: 3,456
 
Default

David

I've always flattened one face on the joiner, then one edge. Then put the boards through the planer to make two faces parallel. If ripping is required, through the table saw, then that edge goes back to the joiner.

Vince
difalkner and Roy Drake like this.

Some folks call me Vince - other folks call me...........
vchiarelli is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-10-2016, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
Moderation Team
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: David
Posts: 3,121
 
Default

Just following up with all 14 finished and ready for delivery Monday. Don't you just LOVE unsteamed Walnut!! So much of the iridescence and figure seems to go away with steamed walnut. The light and dark markings you see change as you walk around the boards - beautiful!


David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 08:11 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Art
Posts: 1,528
 
Default

Black walnut is beautiful but not when a 125 foot tree is directly above your drive. The walnuts are the size of a lemon and when they hit your car...well you can imagine.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	blac walnut trees 003.jpg
Views:	129
Size:	1.04 MB
ID:	247314  

difalkner likes this.
mgmine is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A routing tutorial for beginners Part Four harrysin Guide Bushings and Templates 23 04-21-2013 09:31 AM
Need Jig for Dovetailing ½” stock + Rockler woes + Katie? JavaGeek Jigs and Fixtures 16 02-17-2011 01:46 PM
1/2" Stock for Raised Panel rdlorenzo Router Bits - Types and Usage 5 11-19-2010 09:00 AM
Zebrawood / Walnut Box Build Along¯ Nickbee Show N' Tell 39 06-21-2009 07:18 PM
An alternative way to hold stock harrysin Guide Bushings and Templates 5 02-18-2007 02:47 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome