Small scale routing - Router Forums
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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Default Small scale routing

Hi,

Looking for some advice please.... I make small wooden models and dollhouses in various scales.

Currently I am working on a client project that entails cutting 45 rectangular window openings (approximately 3/4 x 1 3/4 inches) in 4mm birch ply. I have attached a pic showing the window size required. Entire model is approx 12 x 12 inches

I am thinking of routing the openings using a template and I am looking for suggestions on the best way to accomplish this and the best router to use. ie dremel or trim router or table set up.

Whilst this particular project is using thinner wood and small cut outs I often work in 6mm (1/4 inch MDF)and cut openings twice the size.

Given the small opening size there is not much room for error and my hand/scroll sawing technique is not the best

The often suggested Bosch Colt trimmer is unavailable to me both in Turkey & Australia so other recommendations would be gratefully received.

Cheers
Angie
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Last edited by minicurios; 04-13-2017 at 12:47 PM.
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 01:26 PM
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Welcome Angie. Trend also makes a small trim router and is available from the UK for sure, maybe elsewhere in Europe. It is of a lower quality that the Colt, even Trend admits this, but it is also cheaper and would be more likely to be compatible with your electrical power system. Using a round bit to cut these out will give you round corners, no way to get around that fact. The smaller the bit, the closer to being square but the bit also becomes more fragile. A template and decent sized bit, say 6mm or 1/4" would make roughing the openings out a fairly quick job but you'll still need a method for squaring the corners. In thin material a chisel would work but in 6mm or 1/4" maybe not so well. That's what I see you up against.
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 01:27 PM
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Welcome to the router forum Angie.
In the USA you can buy miniature router bits for Dremels
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Looking forward to your participation.
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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
A template and decent sized bit, say 6mm or 1/4" would make roughing the openings out a fairly quick job but you'll still need a method for squaring the corners. In thin material a chisel would work but in 6mm or 1/4" maybe not so well. That's what I see you up against.
Nice house.

What Chuck said. Except I'd try a file on the corners too, see which works best for you.
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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 03:45 PM
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To square up the corners you could try a Gent's saw from Lee Valley tools - I use one of these for hand cut dovetails (a lot cheaper than a "real" dovetail saw) - the teeth are finer.

Classic Gent's Saw - Lee Valley Tools
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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 07:00 PM
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A Gent's saw is not going to fit in those window openings. Cut them with a trim router and bushing, then square the corners with a file.

I built a similar scale horse barn 14" X 36" X 12" high from 1/2" BB for my grand daughter a few years ago. It had to be sized to be in proportion to the plastic horses that she already had. For the windows and door openings I used my laminate trimming router with a 1/8" spiral bit. a template, and a 1/4" router bushing to cut all of the openings. I used a file to square the corners of the openings and then made L shaped molding and cut them to make mitered window and door frames for the openings, which were glued in place. To simulate a metal roof, I cut parallel slots in the roof panels just deep enough enough to cut through the top veneer of the plywood using my Unisaw, spaced 1/2" apart. The roofs were designed to lift off, with strips glued underneath to catch the top edges of the walls to keep them in place. I made the doors and window opening covers (horse barns don't have glass windows, just short doors in the window openings) from 1/4" BB and glued mitered 1/16" strips on the face side of each door, complete with the traditional diagonal brace for a simulated authentic look. All the doors and window covers were hinged and latched with the smallest brass hardware that I could find. She and her mom painted it red with white trim and a silver roof, and then glazed it to make it look aged. The result was great. Unfortunately, I lost all of the build and completed photos in a computer crash a short time later. Some day (soon I hope) they are supposed to visit and bring the barn back so I can take some new photographs of it. They will be posted as soon as I can.

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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 07:14 PM
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Sorry Angie as I have no advice (other than a CNC laser ) , but I have to mention that looks very cool . Amazing actually

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 07:46 PM
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Charley - I stand corrected. I didn't realize the window openings were that small until I re-read the OP.

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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-13-2017, 08:15 PM
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That's impressive.
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-14-2017, 02:39 AM
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Angie; great looking model!
Try looking for luthier's tools.
I realize this link may not help you (in Turkey) but it'll give you an idea of what I'm talking about...
Routers + Bits | stewmac.com
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