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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-25-2009, 06:19 PM Thread Starter
 
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Default Novice router question

I am purchasing my first router and am having a hard time making up my mind. My first project will be cabinets in the garage where I will be doing dados, rabbits and some round overs in plywood. I also want to be able to use a template for holes for adjustable shelves.

I want a router with the best possible dust pick-up.

Now to my question... I really like the festool 1010 which will not do 1/2 bits. How important is it for the ability to use 1/2' bits for the things I need to do ?
My next choice at festool is the 1400.

1010, small size plunge router, comfortable but no 1/2 bits (expensive)
1400 mid size plunge router (very nice but expensive)

also considering...along with dust control product as extra
Triton 2 1/4 hp plung router
Porter cable 894 PK
Bosch 1617

Batterly industries makes a stac-vac base that they (claim) is as good as the dust collection on the festool. The cost is about $150 which when added to the router cost makes this option not much less than just doing the festool.

What do you think ? Can I get by with the festool 1010 (8.5 amps) with only 1/4" or 8 millemeter bits(hard to get), or do I need to stick with a router of mid size that has a 1/2 " collet.

Which of the above options would you recommend ?

Thanks in advance, ron
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-25-2009, 07:28 PM
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Hi Ron I have both the Festool routers. They are great. But for cabinets I would go with the OF 1400 so you can spin the larger bits if you decide you want to do raised panels at some point.

Just so you know the DeWalt 618 dust collection(and the new type III PC 890 plunge) is every bit as good as the Festool and the hose goes straight up, so if you use the Festool boom arm they work great.

If this is your first router why the Festool? They are so expensive you can get 3 routers and set each up with their own bit and knock the cabinets out much faster.

The Festool routers are in my opinion not for table work at all. For the price of the OF 1400 I would get a Milwaukee 3.5 HP unit for a table and a DeWalt 618 plunge router or similar for hand use.. Throw in CT 22 or CT 33 and a boom arm and you are sitting pretty. Then add an OF 1010 as it is probably going to be your go to router along with a 618 type router. I keep mentioning the DeWalt becasue you stressed dust collection. The Bosch 1617 is a great unit too, but I do not love the dust collection on it.

Just my opinion.

But again the OF 1400 is better for cabinet work than the OF 1010 no question. The OF 1010 is slightly underpowered and to me the PC 890 is more powerful albeit not as refined as the OF 1010.

PS If you get the Porter Cable make sure you get the new type III plunge base that is identical the the DeWalt 618 plunge base I talked about above. The older plunge 890 plunge bases are still being sold off so be careful, they stink. The 890 is actually a little more powerful and smoother than the DeWalt 618 and I do use it often also.

Last edited by dovetail_65; 01-25-2009 at 07:37 PM.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-27-2009, 08:10 PM
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Welcome to Router Forums. My feeling is that you will be better to invest in a 1/2 in. router rather than one with a 1/4 in. shank. My feeling is that the bits preform better because of the bigger mass of the shank. also there is a little less chance of breaking the bit.

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 01-31-2009, 11:41 AM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the ideas. Well, here is what I have purchased....I ordered a festool 1010 and purchsed a Bosch 1617 that included the plunge base. Hopefully I will be able to use the 1617 in a table when needed and with the plunge base when using it out of the table. My only question now is, can I change the bit in the table by raising the collet high enough ?

I know I will like the 1010 and liked the simplicity of the Bosch. When I use the Bosch out of the table, I can always go outside for dust control.

thanks, ron
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 06:52 AM
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I believe you will be able to do that, depending on the table setup. If the table top is thicker, than thinner, all bets are off!

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 12:21 PM
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Ron, your choice of the Bosch 1617 is a good one. You have not made mention of the table you plan to mount it to. You have expressed a concern about dust collection which is very important. You may not be familiar with the Router Workshop table but many forum members own and prefer it for some very good reasons. The table is very solid, easy to transport, has on board bit and guide bushing storage, and the thing that sets it apart from all other tables is the available Vac-u-plate dust collection. There is a real advantage in not having to fight with a dust collection hose over the table. Two dust collection ports channel the dust into a hose under the table top, and this does not interfere with popping the router out of the table for bit changes or adjustments. This is about as easy as it gets, and everything from the Router Workshop is designed to work as a system. The table top is predrilled with holes to quickly set up the very popular box joint jigs and other fixtures. At first glance the table will seem very spartan, almost primative. Fences attach with special C clamps that have large round knobs for tightening. In truth this is the quickest way to make set ups. You can buy just the table top and build your own table from plans, or purchase the table ready to use. Either way you can build a base cabinet with the enclosed plans, set the table on a bench or simply clamp it to saw horses as I do. The more you learn about routing the more this "Simple is better" approach will appeal to you. In the photo's you will see my Bosch 1617 mounted in the table, and the dust collection ports not in use since I was outside. I hope you find this information useful.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 12:40 PM
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Can you mention where more info can be found on the overhead boom rigging for routers?

Even in my first couple of cuts as a new user, I've found the cord twists in circle cuts
using a trammel. The dust collection hose has seems like an insurmountable problem until this mention of an overhead arrangement.

Please provide a link(s) to overhead cord and hose control.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 01:10 PM
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http://www.cpofestool.com/products/4...=froogle492753


One of my set ups is shown below. The other picture shows it attached to the Festool vac which is very expensive, but worth every dime.

Many guys make their own Boom Arm(I have one in progress)with PVC and is a very inexpensive alternative if you are never going to move it. If you want to see some home made Boom Arms sign up for the "FOG"(Festool Owners Group) forum and search Boom Arm. You can not see all the pictures on the FOG unless you sign up.

http://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php

Nick

PS it is an old picture sorry about the mess I am organized now though!
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Last edited by dovetail_65; 02-02-2009 at 08:52 PM.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 01:23 PM
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nickao65,

Boy you have lots of stuff!

;-)

A rig like that is beyond my means but still interesting.

I was wondering if there's any inventions that would imitate that thingie that
prevents a phone cord from knotting up?
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 02-02-2009, 08:18 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
Ron, your choice of the Bosch 1617 is a good one. You have not made mention of the table you plan to mount it to. You have expressed a concern about dust collection which is very important. You may not be familiar with the Router Workshop table but many forum members own and prefer it for some very good reasons. The table is very solid, easy to transport, has on board bit and guide bushing storage, and the thing that sets it apart from all other tables is the available Vac-u-plate dust collection. There is a real advantage in not having to fight with a dust collection hose over the table. Two dust collection ports channel the dust into a hose under the table top, and this does not interfere with popping the
router out of the table for bit changes or adjustments. This is about as easy as it gets, and everything from the Router Workshop is designed to work as a system. The table top is predrilled with holes to quickly set up the very popular box joint jigs and other fixtures. At first glance the table will seem very spartan, almost primative. Fences attach with special C clamps that have large round knobs for tightening. In truth this is the quickest way to make set ups. You can buy just the table top and build your own table from plans, or purchase the table ready to use. Either way you can build a base cabinet with the enclosed plans, set the table on a bench or simply clamp it to saw horses as I do. The more you learn about routing the more this "Simple is better" approach will appeal to you. In the photo's you will see my Bosch 1617 mounted in the table, and the dust collection ports not in use since I was outside. I hope you find this information useful.
Yes Mike, I did find your post informative. I was planning on building my table as a project and had looked at pictures of tables alot more complex than this "appears". I imagined a larger table with inserts for the fence as well as one infront for a miter slide and featherboards for safety. The Basic router table from Oak Park lacks some of these features. As a novice, I am trying to plan to buy/build the most sensible table and get accessories to make my work as safe as possible with as good of dust control as available.

How important are the features that I mentioned above? How important for router safety are the feather boards I see being advertised? I like the idea of simplicity and can see the value the Oak Park "Basic Router Table". That is the one you are reference to isn't it?

So, if I order a BRT30001 Basic Router Table w/vacu-plate, will I have all I need to do most router work in a safe manner?
Do I need to order the below recommended items?
ISO26 Brass insert
GN02 Locking Ring Nut
BB0730 Brass Measuring Bars

Note: My first project will be the completion of garage cabinets with lots of drawers. Beyond that, I will do something with the table, but not sure of future projects.

I appreciate your detailed suggestions and I value your/and others opinions here on this forum.

...ron

and yes, i did do a brief update to my profile.
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