Chamfer bit vs skilsaw - Router Forums
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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 04:32 PM Thread Starter
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Default Chamfer bit vs skilsaw

I want to bevel the ends of a bunch of cedar 4 X 4ís. My biggest concern is splintering
at the end of the cuts. I could use a skilsaw, or buy () a chamfer bit. Any
thoughts?
Dale
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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 08:05 PM
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How fussy are you re this particular project, Dale?
Not a lot of support for the base plate of the saw, and you still need some kind of square or fence to run the narrow portion of the plate against. I usually do it freehand but I'm talking about fence posts...
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 09:45 PM
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I agree with Dan. What's the end use and just how much chamfer and at what angle?
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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The 4x4 are not appearance items, they are shelf braces. One end is fastened into a vertical
column, the other end faces outward, and I didn’t want it to be just a flat surface. The 45 degree
chamfers would leave a 1” square in the center which is where the head of a very long
lagscrew resides in a 1/2” recess. I have a jig, but it would be cumbersome to reset for 3 cuts
on 8 posts. These braces are quite short, only 10”, if that makes any difference.
Maybe I should buy the bit, and try both methods. Someone else be pondering about this.
Dale
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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 01:16 AM
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Rough cut them and clean them up with a hand plane, Dale. Ahhh the smell of fresh wood shavings in the morning!
By the way, those are massive chamfers. Try making one chamfer 1/3 that big and see what it looks like before you commit to the big ones.
Another idea; do a scroll on the ends, rather than a chamfer.
https://www.vandykes.com/restorers-r...cket/p/230692/
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 02:24 AM
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What tools do you have? I would just use my chop saw. A skil saw would do it also is that is what you have to work with.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 07:10 AM
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A chamfer bit will not take that amount of wood off to leave a 1" center. On the other hand a skill saw will be extremely difficult for the reasons already stated. If you don't have a miter saw how about a hand saw?
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 08:08 AM
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I would clamp them together with scrap in/out feed pieces. Attach a temporary fence/straight edge that is set up to match your circular saw set to 45*. Make your cut, rinse, repeat.
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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 10:40 AM
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What Bob said about gang sawing them, if you don't have a miter saw that'll take a 4x4.

"...a 1” square in the centre which is where the head of a very long
lagscrew resides in a 1/2” recess."
-Dale
Can't you screw down from the horizontal member into the brace?
If the ends of the brace are set into notches, all the force is in compression. Once the shelf is loaded, you couldn't move those braces even without screws holding them.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=wooden+bra...-3_q&ia=images
If you want to do it from the brace side, pre-drill and counter bore, then use wood plugs after you've screwed it down. Two #10 or #12 woodscrews per end and that sucker ain't goin' nowhere. Lagscrews seem a bit risky on a 10" piece...you'd need to pre-drill completely through the brace at all locations; you don't need or want lateral stress cracking the braces(s). Whichever way you choose, take a wax candle, or bar of soap and thoroughly lubricate the threads. You don't want to create stresses in the brace, as the screws/bolts go in.
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 12-19-2017, 11:42 AM
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I'd build a jig that holds the workpieces in position for whatever tool you choose to make the cut. The shape will have to match the tool. If you have a router table, and the cut is not too large, you can use a square cut piece of ply or MDF to push each 2x4 piece across the bit. The MDF will hold the piece square and avoid chip out.

If you cut with a circular saw, you'll need to work out a flat top plate with a built in fence for the saw to ride on, and that gets a solid grip on the 2x. Push the saw across to make the cut, and let the piece that straddles the 2x as a backer to limit tearout. With most circular saws, you're probably going to have to use a 45 degree blade tilt.
You'll also need a small stop block against which you'll push each block so all pieces have matching cuts. I'd make the table wide and long enough to keep the well saw supported throughout the entire cut. Add a couple of strips of low friction tape to make the saw behave itself.

If you have a table saw, a long piece attached to the miter gauge, coated with some self adhesive sand paper, and with a stop block for the back end will do. Probably the safest option.

I also agree that using a long bolt will probably split at least several pieces, depending on their grain and density. Of course, you could drill a 5/8ths hole and insert a hardwood dowel, then put a shorter screw through the end, into the dowel. This will distribute the load through the length of the dowel and reduce the chance of splitting.

Making the suggested circular saw jig will take maybe 90 minutes to complete.

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