Replacement Bit Wrenches/Stuck Bit - Router Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
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Default Replacement Bit Wrenches/Stuck Bit

Hi!

I have an old Sears Craftsman 315.17400 router that I used for a project a couple of years ago. It has 2 wrenches to change the bit instead of a locking mechanism (at least that's what Dad told me when he gave it to me.) I left the bit in it, probably not smart but....

And now it's stuck. I have the wrench Dad machined He'd lost one of them) that obviously worked because the specialized slot cut bit is in there and I used it, but I must have bent the wrench or something because it won't bite and hold it so I can get the bit out. My 2 questions are:

Can I just take it to Home Depot and get the right sized wrench or does it have to be a special wrench?

Can I put a little WD-40 on the threads to loosen it up a bit?

Thanks!

Last edited by ladysephiroth; 07-10-2018 at 02:39 PM. Reason: Clarity
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 03:19 PM
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Welcome N/A...
DO NOT get WD any-where's near your router no matter what anybody tells you.....
it's the last thing you want on your bearings and inside the motor..
VOE here...
get the correct sized wrench.. what you are looking for is a tappet wrench..
some localized heat from a soldering helps for loosening...
see if any of these PDF's help..

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Collet_Maintenance.pdf (86.2 KB, 13 views)
File Type: pdf STUCK ROUTER BITS.pdf (117.1 KB, 17 views)
File Type: pdf How a Collet Works.pdf (183.7 KB, 18 views)
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 03:51 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks!

I do know how they work, it's the same idea as my Dremel on a much larger scale. I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches and then it's just elbow grease. I think I may have pushed the bit too far in and that's what's making it hard to turn. Good to know about the WD, I do a lot of vintage tech work and we end up lubricating things more often (drive mechanisms and the like.)

Will report back!
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 04:06 PM
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Hi and welcome. I agree with the WD 40. That's not what it's meant for. Some Moovit or Liquid Wrench to help break up any corrosion but the heat may be the most effective. It will cause the nut to stretch when hot enough. NAPA auto parts sells some decent quality wrenches at reasonable prices and they may have the tappet wrenches in stock. HD won't. If a regular wrench fits that's fine. The tappet wrenches are thinner in case there isn't enough room for a regular wrench.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 04:13 PM
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WD isn't a lubricant...
consider a dry lube when you do need a lubricant..

VOE says WD is a mistake and all myth... it's a wet something or another that attracts all kinds of trash... does way more harm than good in the scheme of things... I've made a lot of money cleaning/fixing/replacing/repairing after the fact...
It makes for a humongous mess [remember this come finishing time] and if it gets into an electric motor kiss the motor goodbye... It's also prone to flash fire and really doesn't work all that well on anything but it's convenient...

I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...
CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..
Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting... or any of or all the features WD hasn't got any of....

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..
very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...
Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..
It's a great release agent too...
Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.
Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also less prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.
This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC.

AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems. Silicone products should be banned from the shop along w/ WD40.

WD will kill bearings in very short order.....
it dissolves the bearing's lubricant...

Bottom line - wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 04:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladysephiroth View Post
Thanks!

I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches and then it's just elbow grease.

Will report back!
any place that sells wrench like auto part stores or sears will have tappet wrenches...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-10-2018, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladysephiroth View Post
I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches
My choice would be Lowes. HD has never done me good, and never disappointed yet by Lowes. Actually, your local auto parts store is where I would start.

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-11-2018, 07:22 AM
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I used to have a couple of old craftsman routers (still have them someplace). Both of the locks failed and I had to use a pair of vice grips on the shaft and channel locks to change the bits.

David

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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-11-2018, 09:05 AM
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The wrench is probably a standard size but the one wrench probably needs to be a thin one, as Stick mentioned. If you have one thin one, you might be able to use a standard (thick) one, on the collet nut.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 07-11-2018, 06:48 PM
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Holy smokes, Sticky!!
From where do you take such a knowledge? You are amazing, man.

We, woodworkers are everywhere!!!
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