One end not routing even! - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-23-2018, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy One end not routing even!

I have a Kreg bench-top router table. I'm making a little surprise for you-know-who. My wood is a plain piece of 1X4 pine. The piece is about 28 inches long which routed OK with a 1/4" roundover bit with bearing. The long sides routed perfectly. One end routed perfectly, too. Here's the problem. The other end started OK but the cut seemed to indicate that it pulled away from the fence, making a shallow to "no" cut. I have a miter that I made and just checked it for square- perfect. The only thing I can figure is that the end might not be square and moving the wood away from the bit. I might put it on a sanding disk and run it through again. Your experience and advice are appreciated.
The miter is built on a "runner" and is made of wood. I left the back hole a bit oversize to allow for a "fudge" factor. Again, it shows square to the fence.
I can't understand it- I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express! For a week!
That should read "end."

John T.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-23-2018, 06:55 PM
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the board is being rotated as you feed it which is easy to do considering the length...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-23-2018, 07:09 PM
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It sounds to me like you are running your piece between the fence and the bit. This should never be done. The bit should be in a space in the fence and only the needed portion of the bit sticking through the fence.

End routing is a bit tricky, since end grain likes to grab the bit, and the bit will move the piece of wood out of square when it does this. If using a miter gauge during the end cuts you need to clamp your piece to the miter gauge, so the bit can't pull it out of position. A second piece of wood behind the piece that you are cutting, positioned so that the bit cuts into this second piece as it leaves the first piece, will prevent the end of the cut on your good piece from splintering as this second piece will hold the trailing edge of your good piece as the bit cuts it, and the splintering will occur in the second or scrap piece as the bit exits from that one. Better than a miter gauge, is a coping sled. It has clamps for both the good piece and the scrap piece, and handles positioned safely away from where the cutting takes place. There seems to always be something else expensive to buy when woodworking, doesn't there, but then when you don't have the money to buy the fancy one, you can study it, and then make your own out of wood scraps. My first coping sled was shop made, and it lasted for years.

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 01:33 AM
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I'm not sure I'm clear on what you did John but anytime I push an end across a router bit I use a squared push block against the fence and hold the workpiece tightly against it. If that's not clear the watch Marc Sommerfeld do it on youtube, I think when he he was doing rail and styles but there might be other vids of it too.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 06:31 AM Thread Starter
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Charley, doing all those things but the miter is a simple one and has no clamps. A sled with clamps sounds like a good project for the "To Do" list. What I can't understand is the one end routed perfectly. The the other end is the problem. I thought of moving the fence and using the miter without it with just the miter. Will experiment and see what happens. Thanks.
CC, will look at the recommended videos. Thanks.

John T.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 08:27 AM
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End grain is routed first then any breakout is cleaned up going along the grain. As has been mentioned, a sacrificial push block is essential going across the grain.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knothead47 View Post
Charley, doing all those things but the miter is a simple one and has no clamps. A sled with clamps sounds like a good project for the "To Do" list. What I can't understand is the one end routed perfectly. The the other end is the problem. I thought of moving the fence and using the miter without it with just the miter. Will experiment and see what happens. Thanks.
CC, will look at the recommended videos. Thanks.
If you look closely at the grain direction near the end of your work piece, the end that routed OK likely has it's end grain tilted away from your direction of feed, and it's pointing slightly toward the direction of feed on the end that is giving you trouble. The bit is catching on the ends of the grain and ripping it out.

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
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Charley, will look at the end.
BTW, use to live in central NC. Miss the fresh seafood.
Edit- Just looked at the bad end. It looks rippled as opposed to the smooth cut on the other end. It seems the bit is going against the grain. Now what do I do?

John T.
Life is like water-skiing; if you slow down, you go down.

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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 01:59 PM
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John, I think that many people wouldn't use a miter gauge and a fence at the same time. As Charles and Harry said, I would use a square block against the fence, behind your work, as a pusher and try to shave a hair off at a time. I don't know your skill level, so I hope I'm not insulting you.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
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TenGees, no insult taken. I just recently learned to walk upright. Thanks for the sketch. I'm going to play around with the project as I have plenty of wood to work with and can make another if needed. I did the length as I thought it would be the easiest. I am new to routing as I have had this setup for a while but decided to learn how to use it. To all, many thanks for your suggestions!

John T.
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