Turning a Hole into a Slot - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-28-2019, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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Default Turning a Hole into a Slot

I've made a loom for making twined rag rugs for daughter (see below). It has a couple of braces on the sides to hold the frame at angles for access during weaving. I made the braces with 1/4+" holes for 1/4-20 hardware.
Turning a Hole into a Slot-rug-loom-frame-brace-01-28-19-640.jpg

But now want to modify this arrangement to make the adjustment positions slots rather than holes. And I probably want the openings of the slots to be wider than the bottom.
Turning a Hole into a Slot-rug-loom-brace-slot-01-28-19-640.jpg

I'm wondering what is the best way to open these up. Do a full width plunge with a 1/4" router bit, using a miter gauge to impart a little bit of angle and flipping it around to give the other side some angle? Or bandsaw out the middle and do the above as cleanup passes with the router bit on both sides?

Nominally, I would do the latter, because bandsawing is easy and to minimize the amount of cutting the router bit has to do. But, sometimes, cutting tools like to have nice full bites. Also, I'm thinking the free-hand/miter gauge router passes may be easier to control taking just a little bit.

Thanks,

Rick
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-28-2019, 10:14 PM
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I would set the desired angle on my table saw but it doesn't look like you have one so If you need accuracy then an angle jig on one of the bandsaws. If not necessary to be really accurate then just draw what you want and free hand it.
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-28-2019, 11:44 PM
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I think I'd use a Japanese saw. I'd make a small jig like the drawing in a trapezoid shape with the angle you want for each cut, with a small block on the back to hold it in place while making the cut. I'd make the front out of at least half inch hardwood scrap so it will resist being cut in the process.

Hold the dozuki style saw (with the rigid back) as you would a chef's knife, a finger on the side to keep it from shifting on you, then place the saw against the edge of the jig and probably less than 4 pulls and it will cut through, making an extremely smooth edge.

By the time you set up a saw or router to do this cut, you could be finished with the Japanese saw. If you don't yet have a Dozuki saw, you have no idea what you're missing. Once you use it you will reach for it often, cutting is like slicing butter. Here are pictures of the two types of Japanese saws. The first has no backer, the second shows three types with backers. I like the longer saw best Amazon. About $35 as I recall. You can't have these sharpened, so when it gets too dull to use (that will take a long time judging from mine), you replace the blade part with a new one by clipping it into the backer. The backer keeps the blade ridgid and that's the one to get.

My 2 bits.
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Last edited by DesertRatTom; 01-28-2019 at 11:48 PM.
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 08:05 AM
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What's wrong with a jig saw???

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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 11:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
I think I'd use a Japanese saw. ...snip...
My 2 bits.
Interesting. I've never used a Japanese saw, but I have been a bit curious lately. Not likely I'll be patient enough to order one in time for this project, but thanks for the nudge.

Rick

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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 12:07 PM
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In a pinch, there are plenty of hand tools that will do the job...hand saw, miter box saw, jig saw, hacksaw (coarse tooth), pull saw, even a sheetrock saw, etc... Then there's scroll saw, coping saw...oscillating tool plunge cut...

...and probably lots more ideas...

Mind you, there is always a reason to go get another tool.nature of the game...
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 12:12 PM Thread Starter
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... snip...
there is always a reason to go get another tool.nature of the game...
Yes, I am a charter member of that club, as my daughter will attest as I fill the garage with more tools.

Rick

"If you want nice, clean, fresh oats, you must pay a fair price. However, if you can be satisfied with oats that have already been through the horse, that comes a bit cheaper."
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 12:14 PM
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Yes, I am a charter member of that club, as my daughter will attest as I fill the garage with more tools.

Rick

...and if you're a Tim Allen type, there's always the chain saw in the garage...
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 12:38 PM
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Rick...on a serious note...whatever tool you decide to use, keep in mind that you might create some tear out since you're cutting end grain. Probably not an issue as you'll likely round the edges a bit anyway. If you use the bandsaw you might want to use a blade that has a higher tooth count so you don't tear the bottom. Slight tear out can be sanded but you wouldn't want to chip out a sliver.

For the design, you might not need to cut it wider at the entrance as a bit of rounding on the face edge will allow for easy entry. I would angle the cut to the hole at the same angle as the expected entry angle...this might help to keep it more stable under use.

Good luck...pics are always nice...

Nick

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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 01-29-2019, 12:49 PM
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I am assuming you don't want to have a rough edge or splintering since yarn of some sort will be pulled through the gap and you don't want snags. The Japanese saw produces a baby butt smooth cut without tearout. The jig isn't necessary, but being something of a fuss budget, I would want the cuts to look and be uniform. You could get the Dozuki saw from Amazon in a day or two. Lowes has an Irwin pull saw that's about half the price of a Japanese saw, but it doesn't have the stiffener. But pull saws don't bind, so it might not matter. The saws have about 22 teeth per inch, slightly more than 1mm each.

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