Replicating door and window casing - Router Forums
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 09:29 AM Thread Starter
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Default Replicating door and window casing

Hi all,

I have some trim that I want to replicate at our house, but I'm not quite sure how to do it. I attached an image of the profile - it looks like the double fillet and cove bit from MLCS (I can't link to it because this is my first post), but it's not going to work with the guide on the bottom of the bit, since there's no edge I'll be running against. Any ideas?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 10:18 AM
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Build it up using 3 pieces. Cut the 2 side pieces with the cone cutter and stick them on top of the flai piece which is cut to your trims width.
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post #3 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 10:21 AM
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welcome N/A..
that cut is called a plough or groove and is done on a router table or w/ your material trapped between two opposing edge guides on your router w/ a bearing-less bit....
you could also do it w/ a top bearing bit and a straight edge guide...
VOE says to leave/stay away from MCLS bits...
there are many companies that have far superior products that are a much better value..
Freud..
Whiteside..
CMT..
Radius Cove & Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Roundover Bit

search criteria...
Radius Cove & Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Roundover Bit

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #4 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 10:28 AM
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Here is what I mean.
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post #5 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimac View Post
Here is what I mean.

+1...this would be my choice...
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Nick

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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
+1...this would be my choice...
me too...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 11:05 AM Thread Starter
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Oooo, I hadn't thought about doing it that way. That looks a lot easier than what I was thinking, thanks!

And thanks for the heads-up about MCLS. I somehow got on their mailing list, so I had a catalog and saw the shape I was looking for. I haven't looked any further than that yet.
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post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 11:05 AM
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Good question and BTW, welcome to the fun.

Definitely the 3 piece approach. A couple of strips run through the bit, glued to a flat piece milled to the correct thickness. Easy and inexpensive. Glue and pin nailer and one roundover router bit will do it, especially in a table. Pin nailer to hold the pieces in place while the glue dries. Use waterproof glue if the piece goes on the exterior.

If you have a table saw, rout the edge of wider stock, then cut the trim piece off the edge. Repeat.

If you don't have a pin nailer or compressor yet, you have a perfect excuse. And the compressor will work for a finish nailer as well. Size of the bit is determined by the thickness you need.

That looks like the type of bit you'd use on the edge of a table.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.

Last edited by DesertRatTom; 01-31-2019 at 11:23 AM.
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 11:07 AM
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Totally not what you're asking, Yooper, but not a moulding I've ever seen around here; Was ita really old installation?
In any case, I'd be going with Nick's suggestion (3 pieces). If I needed a lot of it, I'd happily pay a mill-work shop to grind custom knives, and have them run the mouldings.
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 01-31-2019, 11:13 AM
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@Yooper H

The reasons for favoring the 3-piece approach are many...

1. you would otherwise have to deal with hogging out the center to some appropriate amount...
2 if you did find the exact bit, once hogged out you would have to trap the piece inside the bit and run the other direction on the table because it's an inside profile...very dangerous...
3. you would still have to deal with cutting the bottom flat with a router bit, or other suitable cutter, to be exact to the base of the profile on both sides...

For the three piece...
1. you can cut the profiles with the bearing bit without a problem
2. the flat piece would not require much work
3. glue-up would be a snap
4. you would not likely see the lines very much (or at least that they would bother you)
5. if you cut the three pieces from the same timber you will see the separation even less

I'm sure others can chime in with other advantages...

Best success in your project...

Nick

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understand more about some thing.

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