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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-27-2019, 08:44 PM Thread Starter
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Default Coping Sleds

I have been looking for a Coping Sled. Woodpeckers has their sled on sale for $129.99. https://www.woodpeck.com/woodpeckers...sled-2953.html

However I have been looking and drooling over Infinity's Professional Coping Sled but it is $229.90
https://www.infinitytools.com/routin...cross-cut-sled

I really have been extremely happy with Infinity and their products--but it is $100 more. So my question is what do you guys think of these sleds? Is there a better one out there. Is the Infinity worth the price? I kinda cannot believe that I am looking at anything that is priced above Woodpecker's. In my opinion Woodpecker makes amazing things but their prices are usually outrageous. Thanks.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-27-2019, 09:27 PM
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I have a Woodpeker sled. Got it a long time ago and have only used it once. There are so many ways to make the same cuts and the sled is just a little tricky to set up by comparison.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-27-2019, 10:38 PM
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I use a push block to keep pieces square and steady when needed. Like Marc Summerfeld does in some of his videos. If I need to I drill a hole in the push block big enough to get the jaw of an F clamp into. Cost= $0 because I use scrap that I would have burned anyway, plus the push block gives blow out protection at the end of the cut.

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 08:50 AM
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I have and use my Woodpeckers sled especially for cope and stile doors. I tried making two different designs myself but both had too much flexure using either MDF or plywood. What I really like about the Woodpeckers sled is the plexi shield that rides against the fence, the two points of contact on the piece, and the lack of any flexure. I do use sacrificial backup boards to prevent tearout and they simply work very well. And the price was reasonable, at least to me. I'm not sure what Tom found tricky as the setup is the same with or without the sled. Only difference I found was the height of the sled. But my ignorance may have helped there as these were my first attempts at cope and style cuts. Of course the sled was used just for the cope cuts. I guess it depends on how much use you sled would get as to it's value to you. Just a few doors, maybe not as much, but a mess of cabinets, it certainly was easier for me.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 09:02 AM
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I made one for doing rail and stile doors. and after I used it once couldn't see the use for it. I'm not sure if they all are the same but I had to set my bit much higher than usual to make up for the thickness of the plexiglass that I used. I went back to the old method which is to use a miter gauge at a true 90 degree angle to the fence. I also use a backer board to prevent splitting.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 09:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I use a push block to keep pieces square and steady when needed. Like Marc Summerfeld does in some of his videos. If I need to I drill a hole in the push block big enough to get the jaw of an F clamp into. Cost= $0 because I use scrap that I would have burned anyway, plus the push block gives blow out protection at the end of the cut.
Same here Charles - I attached an old push block to a piece of scrap wood - when the edge gets chewed up, I just replace the wood.

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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 10:13 AM
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Ed I'm not positive but it looks like the Infinity sled base is aluminum and the woodpecker sled might be made from plastic or phenolic of some type. Personally, I like the Infinity sled design better, looks like it would be easier to change parts between cuts.

That being said if you will not be making a lot of multiple end grain cuts it might be better to make your own sled and save that money for project wood or hardware. When I was in the furniture business we made a sled instead of buying one. We liked different things on different sleds we found and incorporated them into the sled we built. The sled hung on the wall most of the time after we build the project we made it for and after moving to a new shop I don't even know where it ended up. We might have robber the hardware from it for a different purpose.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-28-2019, 11:19 AM
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If you use matched height door bit sets, then the Sommerfeld method of using a sarificial push block is far easier. If I use the sled with those (or any bit), I have to account for the base thickness. The Wpecker is nicely built, and includes space that should be adequate for a sacrificial backer, having to recalculate height is a loser. You could, of course use a piece the thickness of the sled's base and stack your bit setting block on top of that. But why? It means test cuts are a must.

I use the Sommerfeld easy set jig for their matched bit sets (The yellow one), but it is also available for the Freud matched bit set (red). These are great because they account for the exact thickness of the workpiece. Drop a half inch grommet into the collet and you can change from one bit to the next and not have to reset height at all. The Easy Set jigs are $30 each, the bit sets aren't cheap, although a little less for the Freud sets (last time I looked).

To do rail and style doors on the router, you have to have bits anyhow. So for me, the Woodpecker sled is not necessary. In fact, if you want mine, pm me and we'll strike a good deal. I'd rather see it used than sitting in a box in my shop.

Otherwise, Marc Sommerfeld has some excellent videos on YouTube that show his method. He is a retired cabinet maker who started a tool company, so his technique is great to learn from. He also goes very light on promotion of his tools and heavy on great methodology. He uses the same Triton router I have, so I've copied his way of working completely. I bought his video set and watch the one that applies before I do a project. Beats relying on memory (said the old guy).

I have three of their matched bit sets for rail and stile, Mission, Ogee and glass door. I really like using those bits. Heavy duty.
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Last edited by DesertRatTom; 02-28-2019 at 11:26 AM.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-14-2019, 10:40 AM
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As with most tools, I'd say how much you are willing to spend on a tool depends on how often you will use it and what you will use it for. I just bought the Woodpeckers sled. I've been told that, because there isn't something included which holds down the backing board, the backer sometimes rises up when routing. I have not yet experienced that. I would suspect that whether the backer rises depends on what type of bit you are using. There are remedies for that though, like installing a small clamp in the track. Other than that, I can't seen any real flaws that interfere with my use of the WP sled. It is solid, easy to setup, and works as described. I would guess the Infinity sled is heavier duty and also a great sled, but a sled is a sled and, if you really want to, I'm sure you could make your own that would work well also. I love buying new, great tools so how much you spend, is up to you. I have seen very positive reviews of both the Woodpeckers and Infinity sleds.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-14-2019, 11:20 AM
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I built one from Stumpy Nub's plans. It works great.
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