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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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I need help replicating the window molding in the attached photo. I need at least 20ft. Also any hint on what type of wood that is.

Thanks

Rod
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 06:40 PM
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that was done w/ a molder cut horizontally...
and the cutters will be hurt your brain big bucks...
you may be able to find a cutter that will do the ogee and radius and doing a built up/sectional...
that will take looking at a lot of router bit profiles...

the most practical way to go is to contact a company like Tilo or Deerfield and go from there...
https://www.tiloindustries.com/
https://deerfieldmillwork.com/galler..._mouldngs/773/

QS Fir is my guess on the wood...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 06:41 PM
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what are your sizes w/ that molding???

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and TaxidermyĒ
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 07:31 PM
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I agree with Stick's determine about it being Q/S Fir, and very old due to the darkening of the end. A molder with special matching blades would be the best way to duplicate it. You can have blades ground to match to profile, but if you don't have a molder, you might be able to find a shop that can do the molding and even order the knives to make it for you.

For only 20 ft this is going to be very expensive molding. Perhaps a combination of using several different router bits in a router table can be used to make something close to this, but it will take experimenting and many passes to get it done. It might be cheaper and easier to just replace all of it with a stock molding.

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 10:44 PM Thread Starter
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The molding is for a historic property which needs to stay authentic.

The width of the molding is 5-1/2" [ie 1 by 6]

I was thinking it could be made in three pieces. The center piece cut bevels with a table saw and round over by hand with a plane. The side pieces can then be cut using the router table and standard bits.

Rod
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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 06:33 AM
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You can do that on a router table, but it's a bit tedious.
First, do the profile details on the sides of the center arc. You're drawing shows simple rabbets, but the picture looks like coves?

Once those are done, make a series of passes with a core box bit. Start with a 1/4" bit at the edges, and move the fence about 1/16 (or less) per pass, adjusting the depth of cut as required. When you get enough room, switch to a 1/2" core box bit. The larger diameter will give you a smoother finish, requiring less sanding.

This is the manual version of how I make custom mouldings on a CNC router. Exact small technique, just a different tool.

Ger

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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 08:16 AM
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Something I haven't tried ........ but couldn't a profile be made ........... and using the Tiling method .............. a ......... now hold on ........ I know it's a wild idea ......... a CNC put it out??

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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 11:45 AM
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Certainly. I do it all the time, mostly for curved mouldings.
But be prepared to pay a few hundred dollars for a commercial shop to do it.

Ger

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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 12:41 PM
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He needs one of our people close by him.
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HJ

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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 12:59 PM
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One cheaper option would be to get a molding head for a table saw and get Corob Cutter to grind knives for it or get the straight jointing knives and do it yourself. If you get the right radius you could progressively work from the center out and just lift the head each time to match cuts.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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