Rust prevention - Page 2 - Router Forums
 40Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 01:52 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,432
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
To keep rust off your tools, the best way is to keep the relative humidity in your shop below 55%. Keeping the Dew Point of the air in your shop from ever coming close to 90%+. Dew point is the temperature at which the moisture content in the air from condensing on surfaces, like moisture collects on a cold drink glass. It will collect on metal surfaces in your shop if the tools are colder than the air temperature around it too. I control the heat/humidity in my shop by running a heat pump to keep my shop air temperature above freezing and remove excess humidity at the same time. It provides both heating and cooling, and at about 72 deg F it keeps the humidity at about 55%.

It would be good to learn more about dew point and what it means to better understand how to control rusting in your shop. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point. Keeping the shop air/humidity combination well above it's dew point will do wonders for rust prevention. As air is cooled it can no longer hold as much moisture as it could when warm. When the critical temperature is reached and the air can no longer hold this much moisture, the moisture in it begins to collect on surfaces around it forming dew (dewpoint), drops of water, which then causes the ferrous metal to rust.

This makes a big difference, but I also keep Johnson's Paste Wax on all of my tool surfaces. But I do this more for lubrication of the surface than for rust prevention. It does help keep the moisture in the air from reaching the metal to reduce rusting, but surface lubrication is important too. I even use this wax, applied thick with an old tooth brush to the ways and gears of my saws and machines to lubricate them. The wax quickly develops a hard surface coating, so saw dust doesn't readily stick to it like petroleum lubricants, and it does a fine job for this use. I usually use a Teflon lubricant for other bearing and pivot surfaces in the tools.

Charley

Having a heated shop helps prevent what Charley is talking about but I've also heard of covering the tool surfaces with paper or cardboard when not in use too. That also helps prevent dew from forming on the tools.
thomas1389 and Danman1957 like this.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 03:23 AM
Registered User
 
jj777746's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 4,306
 
Default

I use old bed sheets to cover tools/machines.Looks very untidy according to some people but keeps rust off. I also use old sweat pants legs for protecting hand saws.
Straightlines likes this.

You can't drive a bridge spike with a tack hammer(so I'm told)
jj777746 is offline  
post #13 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 03:46 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 26,124
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
Having a heated shop helps prevent what Charley is talking about but I've also heard of covering the tool surfaces with paper or cardboard when not in use too. That also helps prevent dew from forming on the tools.
I tried that...
not so good...
kp91 and DaninVan like this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 09:03 AM
Registered User
 
smitty10101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Country: United States
First Name: smitty
Posts: 155
 
Send a message via Yahoo to smitty10101
Default

Just wondering here---
if air circulation in an enclosed area (garage/basement) would delay the formation of the rust.
I realize that the humidity is in the air and settles out onto a surface
but if the air movement would aid in evaporation of the moisture.

air circulation, as in fans not a dehumidifier/air conditioner.

also curious about covering a surface. Wouldn't that trap the moisture between the cover & the metal thus causing more rust? IIRC the commercial covers are non-porous. Sorta like a cheap table cloth---cotton one one side and some type of plastic material on the other.

maybe putting a container of Damp-Rid on the saw to collect the humidity in the immediate area? Or would that actually attract more humidity to the area?

was thinking of an experiment but a non climate controlled garage is not the best subject.

smitty
DaninVan likes this.
smitty10101 is offline  
post #15 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 09:09 AM
Registered User
 
ger21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Country: United States
First Name: Gerry
Posts: 349
 
Default

Imo, Bostik GlideCote (formerly Top Coat) is far superior to paste wax. It lasts longer, and does a much better job of preventing rust. I've been using it for 20+ years.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...k_ql_qh_dp_hza
Danman1957, Straightlines and Inor like this.

Ger

www.cncwoodworker.com
ger21 is offline  
post #16 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 09:38 AM
BCR
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Country: United States
Posts: 121
 
Default

Wax, some swear by it. AMAZON LINK HERE

This is great stuff, and not just for table saw or blades, AMAZON LINK HERE
As well, this (aerosol) AMAZON LINK HERE
Inor likes this.
BCR is offline  
post #17 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 11:10 AM
Registered User
 
Danman1957's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 744
 
Default

I haven't read the label but it's old, I've been using it for many years and never a problem. I'll check the label to see if it lists the contents.

Don't fear your tools, pay attention and respect the tools and avoid injury.
Danman1957 is offline  
post #18 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 02:47 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,270
 
Default

I agrre with you, Smitty. Air movement is extremely helpful, and yes, I tried the tool covering thing; it was a rust nightmare! Must have been a couple of months before I uncovered the TS and discovered the damage.

I should add that it's damp here for most of the year...right on the PNW Coast; Charles, up in Cherryville, has dramatically different climate conditions. So may well work better for him.
JFPNCM and Danman1957 like this.

Last edited by DaninVan; 09-22-2019 at 02:51 PM. Reason: added text
DaninVan is online now  
post #19 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-22-2019, 06:07 PM
Registered User
 
Inor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 29
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BCR View Post
Wax, some swear by it. AMAZON LINK HERE

This is great stuff, and not just for table saw or blades, AMAZON LINK HERE
As well, this (aerosol) AMAZON LINK HERE
I used to use paste wax until I discovered Boeshield too. Great stuff!

https://www.rockler.com/boeshield-t-...-12-oz-aerosol
Inor is offline  
post #20 of 39 (permalink) Old 09-23-2019, 01:17 AM
Registered User
 
gdonham1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Guy
Posts: 232
 
Default

I tried the paste wax in my uncontrolled work shop and still got rust. I lived in Houston Texas which is about 50 miles from the coast so it is hot and humid in the summer and cold and humid in the winter.

I discovered a product called TopSaver which I get from Amazon. It removes surface rust but more importantly it prevents it. You wipe it on and then wipe off the excess. You can use those 3M non woven green and red pads to remove rust or general funk from your cast iron and it is protected.

Like someone above I cover my machines with clearance table cloths from Bed Bath and Beyond. Only use cotton table cloths so it can breath. The main benefit I get from the table cloth is my shop door is open all day and bugs fly in. Then when I shut the door they buzz around until they die and crash and burn on top of my cast iron. Many larger bugs cause black spots on your cast iron from the moisture in their bodies. An added benefit of the table cloths is spiders do not build webs above my cast iron and spit out their dead victims on my cast iron.

On my bandsaw I got one of those magnetic pads that is like a giant refrigerator magnet. The pad is flexible and I cut a slot so I put the pad around the blade. The magnetic property of the pad keeps the air and humidity out. I still put TopSaver on the cast iron but when I use the saw it is always just like I left it last time it was used.

So the TopSaver I use has been around about 15 years and works great for me. I tried Boeshield and some others with frogs and such but the TopSaver has worked best.

Last edited by gdonham1; 09-23-2019 at 01:21 AM.
gdonham1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome