Problem with Dewalt Planer - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by kywoodchopper View Post
I'll report back once I find a solution.

Did anyone see the 2nd part of my message about the dust port on the Bosch miter saw where I can't find a connector that fits?

Malcolm / Kentucky USA
Check out Youtube there are plenty of suggestions on making a dust collection system for miter saws. Because the way these saws are made you need more than a shop vac set up As far as the planer ditch the dust collection and go with the internal fan.
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post #22 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 08:19 AM
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And herein lies the great value of such forums. Where else would you likely hear of the solution? Not likely the manufacturer as it is one they would be responsible for. But one has to wonder, with the popularity of this planner why is this seldom reported? I recently read a posting about the differences in shop vacs and central dust collectors whereas shop vacs are high volume high velocity systems and central dust collection is high volume low velocity. Keep in mind this brain has a few years on it and I can't locate that post/article. Could this be a factor?

Another consideration, if this just started 2 years ago something must have changed. Was it the method of dust collection, a change in design (add/remove piping blast gates, length of run). Has using a shop vac been tried? I mean this worked fine for 8 years so something had to happen, right? Another thing to keep in mind, fan blades move air but dirty fan blades move much less air. In my years as a HAVC tech I had to work with a number of engineers due to design build projects. That meant getting down and dirty with the specs especially with projects like clean rooms. Most of us never look or have access to the design specs of a piece of equipment but that's where the information is about air volume and static pressures.

And that's where things can go awry. If the fan is accessible I'd first clean the blades. It would be helpful to check the RPMs but that spec may not be listed on the fan but amp draw might and that, when checked in the installed position should be doable easily if you have a clamp on meter that reads amps and it wouldn't be a clamp on if it couldn't But then is it DC or AC amps?

Or again, if the fan isn't too expensive try replacing the fan but that's a gamble because it may well not make a difference. Also checking the path all the way to the exit and making sure it's unobstructed and reasonably clean. This could take some time if you truly want to determine the issue. The process that the one fella did removing the impeller (fan blade) may have improved the outcome but may have masked the true reason for the problem.

And this is one reason I have grey, balding hair. It's sort of like finding a blown fuses/tripped breaker on a HVAC system. Some, not so good techs simply replace the fuses or reset the breaker, turn the system on and if it runs consider it fixed. A better tech checks a few things like amp draw on the system. A good tech puts the system through it's paces. Let's say it's a heat pump. Turning it on puts it in one mode, either heat or cool. So maybe it runs fine in both but there's one mode that hasn't been checked. Defrost uses several circuits that aren't in play during a normal heat mode run. And not checking that can keep you coming back on return calls, more fuses, and on the house labor for not curing the issue the first time.

Long story shorter, it was the defrost thermostat lead that was tie strapped at the factory on the discharge line of the compressor. After about 15 years of not being a problem it became a problem when the wire shielding finally rubbed through to the copper wire thus creating a direct short when the defrost sensor made (the line got cold enough to close the contact in the defrost sensor thus allowing 24 volts to travel through the wire). This created the short that blue the 3.2 amp fuse that GE used in their control system and is somewhat unique in that it has the cap and fuse as a single part.

For the record I was the second tech on this call. The first simply replaced the fuse and started the unit and walked away. He was on site for less then 15 minutes whereas I was there almost 2 hours. Finding the problem in defrost was done in probably the first 45 minutes. Locating a wire worn through and shorting out was a bit harder........

Just saying, it's not always what it appears. I would look deeper but I'm old and have time.....not sure how much time but some.......
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post #23 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 09:12 AM
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So somehow I missed the entire 2nd page of posts.....disregard my post please.
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post #24 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 11:29 AM
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Question 2. Miter saw dust collection attachment. This came with an old small Canadian Tire shop vac. It is tapered on both ends. 1 1/2" and 1 3/8". Either end will slide into the 1 1/2" end on my 2" hose allowing the other end to fit a lot of my tools. Bosch miter saw, Makita track saw, Festool sander. Try looking for 2" size attachments and you may find one. It works great with my shop vac.

You could try one like this. You can cut them to size.
https://www.amazon.com/Shop-Vac-906-...5&sr=8-1-fkmr0
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Last edited by jemangin; 11-03-2019 at 12:03 PM.
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post #25 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 11:39 AM
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Rockler also has small hose adapters. See here https://www.rockler.com/dust-right-a...oaAjOMEALw_wcB
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post #26 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 03:27 PM
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I never get around to it, but I've noticed on other brand miter saws that there is a scoop shaped boot behind the blade. The DC behind the blade on the Bosch does not have such a boot to collect more of the sawdust flying off the blade. Seems to me you could use a bit of aluminum flashing to form something like a shoehorn to capture more of the sawdust into the air stream, thus less mess. Notice in the picture that the opening must be wide enough to allow the retracting hood knobs to clear, but not so wide that it can't fit through the opening in the fence. Should be easy to hold it in place with two short bolts, or even machine screws.

If you add a split wood front to the fence, you could just attach a scoop to that, which runs up to the DC port. If you're using a backer board to avoid chip out on tall pieces, you might have to develop a different solution.

That behind the blade port is a straight through opening to the DC hose. It's just too high to catch everything. The other thing I've noticed is that when I cut, if I make a shallow cut toward me, then the deeper cut on the push back, the first cut makes a little channel that aims most of the dust straight back, where a small aluminum boot would direct more of it into the DC port.

I also like this pix because if you look on the motor, you can see the cap for easy replacement of the brushes. This is pretty much standard on most power tools these days. Disassembly is not required.

Last thing: I bought a flex hose for a large shop vac that fits in the DC port of the saw. On the othe end is a 2 inch to four inche Rockler adapter that slides into the long DC flex hose. I try to keep the large flex hose as short as possible, so most of my tools are within 12 feet of the start of the DC system.
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post #27 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-03-2019, 05:27 PM
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So somehow I missed the entire 2nd page of posts.....disregard my post please.
Disregard? disregard??? Geez, I spent a lot of time reading that post. And now disregard?
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post #28 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 06:33 AM
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the only time I have a chip problem with my 735 is a result of the dust collector bag being too full.
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post #29 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 08:28 AM
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Disregard? disregard??? Geez, I spent a lot of time reading that post. And now disregard?
You don't have a lot of time left either I take it?
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post #30 of 35 (permalink) Old 11-04-2019, 07:29 PM
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Rubber connectors for plumbing pipe are very flexible and will stretch and contract a great deal. They come in all sorts of sizes and configurations and I have used several to adapt odd shaped outlets to standard vacuum or dust collector hose. Menard's, Lowe's, and Home Depot all have a large selection. Be sure to get the bare rubber ones, not the ones with the corrugated stainless steel sleeve over them!
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