OMG, I can't read another word...Advice? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-27-2020, 05:47 PM Thread Starter
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Default OMG, I can't read another word...Advice?

I bought this book awhile back: Woodworking with the Router: Professional Router Techniques and Jigs Any Woodworker Can Use: Bill Hylton and Fred Matlack ISBN: 0-87596-751-5

The book is loaded with information...And is putting me to sleep! It is way over my head, and not an easy read or entertaining in the least.

Can anyone recommend a beginner, easy to read and understand router learning book for us slow minded folks?

Perhaps that has easy to follow samples, some easy to make useful jigs for beginners.

I don't want to learn everything at one time, I just want to learn the basics and build from there.

Thanks as always in advance.
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-27-2020, 06:13 PM
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Patrick speilman's New Router Handbook,
https://www.amazon.com/New-Router-Ha.../dp/0806905182

Robert Rosendahls Router

https://www.amazon.com/Router-Robert.../dp/0919823025

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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-27-2020, 07:50 PM
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Jessie; I don't think Hylton expects anyone to sit down and read his books cover to cover. It's more of a 'here's the info on that particular aspect of routing' when you need it. There's just way too much info to absorb.
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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-27-2020, 08:33 PM
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I'm assuming you've caught some of the Youtube videos on Basic Router stuff...?

Books are great but really more for reference material. Best way to read the books is to skim through it so that your mind's eye remembers what might be in there. Just read one chapter at a time and while doing that, try what the chapter discusses...

Is your router in a table or are you wanting to learn some free-hand techniques...? How it is used dictates the information you will need...

Sometimes it's more practical to pick your project and then determine the one or two technique required. For example, the project might require some edge-profiling...maybe a slot or two.

By doing this you will get some explicit direction on this Forum and you can search Youtube or your Hylton books for that particular operation.

Might this make it easier for you...?
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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 08:02 AM
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There's sound advice there. It's similar to an encyclopedia, and if that doesn't date me nothing does, but look at an aspect that interest you and read/try that. But of course read the safety information first and the basic use chapters where they explain direction of cut and so on. Build on that a bit at a time. As for the jigs and so on I build them as needed. Likely there will be some you may never use, why build those? It's like covering inlay, unless you have a project you want/need to do this you may never actually do a project that needs this so anything you learn you'll likely forget. Move on to something that applies to what you're doing or want to do. Of course you'd want to scan the book for stuff you might be interested in or maybe likely to be interested in later. Then you'll have an idea where to look when the time comes. Like watching the trailer of a movie sorta..........
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 08:29 AM
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I wouldn't bother wit a book. A router is a pretty simple tool to use but do be careful with it. My advice would be to mount it on a table and leave it there. I'm a pretty heavy router user and three years ago I did a test to see how many times I had to remove the router from the table to do a job. The count so far is zero. There may be times when you need to plunge a router into something so for that you will remove the router but for everyday things that a router is designed for you are safer using it on the table. As far as building jigs, forget it. I'm going to get roasted but the only simple jig that is better made than buying is a circle jig. Of course, you will have to remove the router from the table to use it. The other jigs usually take longer to build and set up and are less accurate than simply buying a jig. In addition, jigs are a way of getting around buying the correct tool to do whatever it is that you are trying to do and that in itself can be dangerous. That's not saying that all jigs are bad I'm just saying that once you take the time to make one you will see what I mean.
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 08:41 AM
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Art, that might make sense for some but it really depends on how and what is wanting to be done and not everyone has a router table. Now I admit that I use my router table 99% of the time but that's me. I have a friend, if you can believe that, and he uses mostly his handheld router quite well. Table vs. handheld is so subjective to use and need. And let's face it, educating oneself on the use and possibilities of a tool can't be bad. Heck even I learn something new after rereading some books at times. Having an open mind and learning from others, videos, and books is what keeps us educated and none of us know it all although I've met a few who swear they do.....and sharing on this forum helps us all learn new things. Just saying it's always good to have multiple sources to draw from.
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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 10:26 AM
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I (only) have four, and i use them all freehand. I will at some point get around to building a table!
Having said that, this seems like a pretty nice investment for $150...
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ompact-routers

Plus the $15 for the acrylic base plate of course...
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ter-base-plate
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 10:36 AM
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Hylton's earlier book with lots of color illustrations is an easier read, but I got my mind wrapped around routers, by watching particular videos.

Check out Youtube, videos by Marc Sommerfeld. He has a company that sells bits, jigs and other stuff, but he was a cabinet maker before that and his technique is really simple and easy to learn from. There are many other videos on youtube about using routers, many are great, many are mediocre, and a great many have removed all safety devices so you can see what the bit is doing.
I agree with the others that a book is for quick reference for spedific solutions to woodworking project problems.

If you are fairly new to woodworking, you might find the attached pdf of the 18 things that accelerated my learning curve, and might help you avoid a couple of the expensive mistakes I made. It's long, but has pictures and pretty concise information.

Here's a place to start with Sommerfeld.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 18 things illustrated 19-06-16 .pdf (2.58 MB, 25 views)
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old 02-28-2020, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
I (only) have four, and i use them all freehand. I will at some point get around to building a table!
Having said that, this seems like a pretty nice investment for $150...
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ompact-routers

Plus the $15 for the acrylic base plate of course...
https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ter-base-plate
That is really cute little router stool. very versatile a person could stand on that to reach the top shelf.
Herb
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