Which Fence to use ??? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 12:13 PM Thread Starter
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Default Which Fence to use ???

Hi everyone,

I have been working on my New Yankee Router Station and am nearing completion. I am debating if I should use the Fence in the plans , or several years ago I purchased a Freud Fence that seems to have better fine tuning capabilities but no place for a feather board from the top.
I don't have a bit to cut the slot for the bolts to hold the feather board but I bought several t tracks because I also want to make a crosscut sled and a drill press table.
So what are your opinions on the fence choice ?

TIA, Dan
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 04:03 PM
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I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 05:24 PM
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Can't say, because I do not use a fence on the router. However, have an upcoming project where a fence will be mandatory if I want to finish quickly and consistently. Right now I'm trying to decide whether to use a chunk of 2X4, or 1X2, or whatever else is handy. I will need precise and consistent results, but a fence like I plan will do exactly that for me, if I watch what I am doing. Sometimes you just don't need fancy to do the job. And as this will hopefully be a one time thing, not about to buy anything, or make anything fancy. If I were you I'd just pick the fence I liked most and go with it.

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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
Separate fences sound like a great idea . Iím liking the idea of having a dedicated fence for jointing .
I still regret buying an Incra system, as Iíd be building multiple fences if I could do it all over again
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 06:33 PM
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Separate fences sound like a great idea . Iím liking the idea of having a dedicated fence for jointing .
I still regret buying an Incra system, as Iíd be building multiple fences if I could do it all over again
And there are free fence plans on line. I'd make multiples also, all non adjustable, which is why multiples. To me they are just not that hard to make.

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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-28-2020, 11:54 PM Thread Starter
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What if I make 2 sets of openings; 1 for the Freud and 1 for the New Yankee ?
Or maybe I could simply modify the plans and make one set of openings and modify the New Yankee fence opening locations in the table top to use the same holes as the Freud.
If you are facing the front, the left side fence has an adjustment knob on the Freud. It doesn't look complicated to use.

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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 01:31 AM
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I posted a picture of my home made one in another one of your threads here Dan: https://www.routerforums.com/general...ow-many-2.html It has a basic frame with moveable faces added by routing slots in the frame and then matching ones in the faces with a wider slot on the front of the faces for the heads on the carriage bolts that hold the faces to the frame. The square shoulder on the bolts fit tight in the grooves and keep them from turning when I tighten the knobs that clamp them. The moveable faces add versatility because I can slip shims down over the bolts on the outfeed for jointing and I can remove those faces add put different ones on for other jobs. I have a tall set that I use for edge routing standing panels and I have plans for ones with t tracks for stops and hold downs. The original reason I made the fence with sliding faces was to keep the gap around the bit close, partly for safety and partly to keep from making divots when starting and stopping but later I realized that I could change them for different ones as needed.

BTW, I put my on/off switch on top of the dust collection box on the fence and after using it for a while now I'll never mount it anywhere else again.
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Last edited by Cherryville Chuck; 03-29-2020 at 01:34 AM.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I've heard issues with some of the fences which have individually adjustable halves which allow for jointing. The complaints were about getting the separate fences back to zero again. I don't know if that is one of those or not. It would seem to be a better idea to have ones have ones that you just shim behind for that one function.
Chuck I have a Woodpecker split fence that has the ability to be offset and haven't had issues getting it back afterwards. One side is adjustable and a good straightedge will make quick work of it. Just loosen the adjuster and bring back to even with the fixed side.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 07:21 AM
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Charles, I am coming to your way of thinking as regards the switch. I have put one under the front edge of the table for all three of my table-mounted routers, following the wisdom that one could ďbumpĒ off the power with a hip or knee, in an emergency. But in my disorderly and overpopulated shop, all that has happened is that I have broken off two of the paddles, while moving around (when the routers were not in use). Come to think of it, if things were to go south, it would happen so fast, that I am not sure there would be any real benefit to the front-mounted location.
Regarding the fence itself, I have combined an aluminium angle, the largest standard size available, with two moveable front fences. The L-angle is one piece, with a mouse-hole for the largest bit I am likely to use (horizontal panel raiser).
On the larger table, the split front fences are 32 mmk chipboard (left over from a kitchen counter). They have countersunk bolts, riding in horizontal slots in the L, with star knobs behind the fence.

The smaller table has the same L, but I happened on some extruded aluminium profile, which is rectangular 20mm by 40mm, with two T-slots on each face, and one on each edge. To avoid having to cut a mousehole in such a complicated profile, I opted for two sections, attached to the L with T bolts and Star knobs at the back. But I must say it is overkill, and causes some loss of efficiency with the dust extraction. I am considering splicing the two sections after cutting half a mousehole in each, and then attaching split hardboard fences in front, with countersunk bolts and sliding nuts in the tracks.

One of the benefits of the profile is that it sits squarely on the table top. I found that the L flexed ever so slightly with a tall workpiece. Also, the slightly radiused corners provide an escape for sawdust.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-29-2020, 09:53 AM
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I have a Bosch split fence from their 1181 table. It has dust collection and uses shims (1/32 and 1/16) for jointing. For that matter a DIY shim of any size will work... It also has a track for featherboard but a spacer is needed behind it to bring the featherboard out enough to sit in front of the fence. The split fences also slide side-to-side to accommodate various bit diameters.

I like the simplicity of the shims.

Nick

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