Cordless trim router or corded plunge base router for making 8" hole? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-02-2020, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
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Default Cordless trim router or corded plunge base router for making 8" hole?

Hi, I want to cut a 8" hole out of an IKEA 2cm thick cabinet. I went to HomeDepot and a sales told me that it is much better to buy cored router than a battery operated cordless router for making a perfectly nice looking big hole due to stability of the power source. Is it really true?

Between the Ryobi 18V ONE+ Cordless Fixed Base Trim Router and the Ryobi 2 HP 10-Amp Plunge Based Router, which is better for my task? Another other good product recommendation?
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-02-2020, 11:28 AM
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Hi New To and welcome. When you get a minute why not edit your profile and give us a name to call you other than that. Your IP address says you are a fellow Canuck from Ontario so you could add that as well.

If you are buying a first router then I would say it should be corded and at least 2 hp or around 1200 watts and preferably a plunge. Or better yet a kit with plunge and fixed bases. You can do anything with a plunge but some jobs can't be done with a fixed base.

Those cordless routers are basically just for trim jobs. Cutting holes in anything more than say 3 or 4 mm thick would be hard on it. Plus you are limited to only 1/4" bits. Ryobi is close to the bottom of the quality range. It's meant for the occasional use by a weekend DIYer. If you want a router that will hold up better then go with a Bosch. DeWalt, Milwaukee, or Hitachi (Metabo now). I know they are way more money (except maybe the Metabo) but it will hold up better and may have parts available for longer. Most Sears routers were made by Ryobi, anything with a model number that started with 315. specifically. We see a constant stream of people trying to find parts, with collets being the biggest issue. Bosch, DeWalt, and Hitachi Metabo are all using the same collet right now for most of their models so you can expect those to be available for decades to come I would think

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-02-2020, 12:42 PM
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Hi, For the same reasons, Charles recommendations are right on. I prefer Bosch (have 3 total) the 1617 here in the US. They make a kit EVSPK that comes with both a fixed and plunge base. The plunge base is what you'd use to cut our that circle. It has stops so you can cut the circle in several passes. You will need a circle cutting jig of some sort. Bosch makes an edge cutting attachment that will also work as a circle jig. You can use the fixed base and the Bosch in a home made table, which won't help with the circle cutting, but for most other uses, the table is the safest way to do routing jobs.

Not sure about Canadian machines, but I think Bosch uses MOF as their model designation. The issue of orphaned machines is a constant on this Forum, but never for the brands Charles mentioned, especially the Bosch machines. Collets are very precise devices, and work by squeezing down just a few thousandths on the shank of the bit. They are easily damaged and can't safely be used. Do get something with a half inch shank, the 1/4 inch shank really limits what you can safely use the router for.

I must say that I'm just about had it with battery operated tools. The batteries fail and then you discover they've changed the form factor, connectors and/or voltage and then you get to pay a premium for leftover batteries, try to have them rebuilt, or toss the machines. I really like my DeWalt 18 v tools, but the 20 v adapter is junk and the 18v batteries are now double the price they once were.

Finally, I just don't care for Ryobi products.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-03-2020, 07:26 AM
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Welcome to the club. Bosch is a favorite of mine as well.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-03-2020, 01:39 PM
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Welcome to the forum I would also opt for a corded router and as the others have said the Bosch is a good brand.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-03-2020, 01:59 PM
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Welcome to the Forum. I'd go for the Bosch 1617 kit.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-03-2020, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
Hi, For the same reasons, Charles recommendations are right on. I prefer Bosch (have 3 total) the 1617 here in the US. They make a kit EVSPK that comes with both a fixed and plunge base. The plunge base is what you'd use to cut our that circle. It has stops so you can cut the circle in several passes. You will need a circle cutting jig of some sort. Bosch makes an edge cutting attachment that will also work as a circle jig. You can use the fixed base and the Bosch in a home made table, which won't help with the circle cutting, but for most other uses, the table is the safest way to do routing jobs.

Not sure about Canadian machines, but I think Bosch uses MOF as their model designation. The issue of orphaned machines is a constant on this Forum, but never for the brands Charles mentioned, especially the Bosch machines. Collets are very precise devices, and work by squeezing down just a few thousandths on the shank of the bit. They are easily damaged and can't safely be used. Do get something with a half inch shank, the 1/4 inch shank really limits what you can safely use the router for.

I must say that I'm just about had it with battery operated tools. The batteries fail and then you discover they've changed the form factor, connectors and/or voltage and then you get to pay a premium for leftover batteries, try to have them rebuilt, or toss the machines. I really like my DeWalt 18 v tools, but the 20 v adapter is junk and the 18v batteries are now double the price they once were.

Finally, I just don't care for Ryobi products.
I agree overall - especially for tools that need power to do well, but I use battery drills and prefer them - Boschís oldest 12V line is excellent - Iíve used my original set for almost ten years and the tool and batteries are still go strong. Nothing else in a battery model, tho.
I bought a Ryobi Sawzall and it is every bit as good as a more expensive one, so choose each tool choice for its maximum needed purpose.
I have the Bosch 1617 EVSPK and would not trade it for anything - smooth and powerful but their inverted fixed based for a table moun t is pathetic - youíll need a good lift if you go that far - I went with Jessem and love it.

Common Man Woodworking
Powell, TN
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-05-2020, 08:18 AM
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The only time that I found my battery powered router to be of significant benefit was when using it with a circle cutting jig. Otherwise any time that I wanted to use it, the battery either needed charging before I could use it, or it died on me mid way through the job. When a router becomes un-usable during a job, it's quite a hassle to move the router bit to another router and get the bit height exactly the same so you can finish the cut without a step or mark where you had to make the change.

I sold my battery powered router less than 6 months after I bought it. Sometimes working with a corded router is a little inconvenient, but it is easier for me to work through it than to fuss with the short comings of dead batteries and charging times.
I suppose my life with a battery powered router would have been easier if I had several batteries, but I didn't, and decided that I was better off staying with my corded routers.

Charley

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-14-2020, 06:00 AM
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@New Guy

will chime in as well...

since you didnt mention where you are from i am guessing USA.....(makes a big diff re product recommendations)

hard to answer without knowing what your woodworking needs are. buying a router JUST for boring a hole doesnt make sense (to me at least). Personally if i needed a tool JUST for one job i would loan from a friend, forum member (or bring the cabinet to a carpentry shop and pay someone 20 bucks to do it etc)

ASSUMING that you are into woodworking and are leveraging this project to buy a router..... (we have all been there

If i could only have one router it would indeed be a 1/2" collet corded with plunge.... this would manage almost all jobs (handheld and table etc)

BUT - its damn heavy for trim work, especially when you have to work on something in-situ - like trimming existing projects or stuff that is already complete and built.
for those purposes a trim router is a must - and the cordless ones are amazing!! i Have a Makita cordless trim and its just great to work without cords....
of course that means that you need AT LEAST two batteries and a charger - so need to work that out into the $$$


AS PER the project you describe - I just finished making a kitchen island from yellow pine and cutout a 10" hole in the top which was 2" thick with my TRIM ROUTER no problem...of course it took quite a few gentle passes....


YMMV

Mike
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-14-2020, 10:57 AM
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@New Guy


ASSUMING that you are into woodworking and are leveraging this project to buy a router..... (we have all been there

Mike
Shhh. You aren't supposed to say that out loud. The wrong ears could be listening.
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