Fence placement Question - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 10:55 AM
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If using a fence with a bearing bit, you can use a straight edge to span the split in the fence, the move it until the straight edge just touches the bearing. If you are cutting stock for a frame and it is cut to length and/or you are routing after cutting the miters, this technique will reduce the chances of tear out. For this reason I usually route before cutting the miter with a little big longer piece than needed, then final cut the miter to exact dimension. I generally allow an extra bit of more width and length on the rabbet than the size of the canvas.

When routing the face of the frame with a longer, vertically oriented bit, I cut in one pass and finish with sanding with a shaped block. I start with a piece that is much longer than required and make passes so there is a bit of flat at the ends, this is particularly important if you are going to use multiple bits to shape the frame front. A long fence is required for this if your frame is fairly large.

My wife is an artist so I make a fair number of frames. It's far cheaper to shape your own material than to buy it, and I find that a LOT of frame stock is too warped to use, so you wind up with a lot of useless, costly scrap. It's much cheaper to buy shorter chunks of wider stock, prep and cut it into strips and mill those on your table. Even then, it's a good idea to do it all on one day because warping can happen very fast.

Here is a picture of the sanding blocks I got from Rockler. I use the 3M flexible sanding material with them and can final sand up to about 220 grit in minutes. There are straight and wedge shaped blocks as well. I think I paid less than $12 for them, and the different sizes seem to fit every curve perfectly.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreilly View Post
Just to be clear, can you post a picture of your portable router table w/fence? Nick's post is dead on but the starter pin is a support for the wood to guide on and the bearing keeps the wood a specified distance from the cutter. Raising or lowering the bit will change the cut but the distance bearing keeps the wood at a constant fixed distance. Raising or lowering the bit just changes the depth of cut. If for some odd reason you don't have a starter pin or a hole threaded for it you can always make one to use.
Thanks,

I did post a link to the one I have at the bottom of my response to Nickp
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DesertRatTom View Post
If using a fence with a bearing bit, you can use a straight edge to span the split in the fence, the move it until the straight edge just touches the bearing. If you are cutting stock for a frame and it is cut to length and/or you are routing after cutting the miters, this technique will reduce the chances of tear out. For this reason I usually route before cutting the miter with a little big longer piece than needed, then final cut the miter to exact dimension. I generally allow an extra bit of more width and length on the rabbet than the size of the canvas.

...
Thanks,

The 4 frames I routed, I had already mitered and glued. So I routed them as a finished work.

Routing the edge was a secondary thought as I was kinda bored with the standard frames I had been making and thought I would "spruce" it up a bit and try something new.

It was pretty simple doing so, as I had watched a video of someone else doing it and figured "why not" LOL
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 08:16 PM
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If you are routing endgrain ,which you sometimes have to do on contoured pieces, ALWAYS use a pin to start the cut. Otherwise the bit will want to grab the piece and wrench it from your hand.
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