Fence placement Question - Router Forums
 44Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 02:25 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Country: United States
First Name: Jessie
Posts: 136
 
Default Fence placement Question

This seems like a really silly question but for some reason I can not grasp the concept...

When using a fence with a table top router (I have a Bosch Colt with a portable top), how do you decide where to place the fence?

For example: I made some picture frames and used my router and table but I didn't use the fence and I think I was supposed to use it for support?

I used a Roman Ogee bit for the frame only made one pass and then cleaned up any high spots with a 2nd pass.

The frame came out fine, but felt odd to me to not use the fence.

I would never think of not using a fence on table saw, but this has me baffled

Thanks as always in advance
newbie2wood is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 02:55 AM
Forum Contributor
 
Stick486's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Country: United States
First Name: Stick
Posts: 31,260
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie2wood View Post
This seems like a really silly question but for some reason I can not grasp the concept...

When using a fence with a table top router (I have a Bosch Colt with a portable top), how do you decide where to place the fence?

For example: I made some picture frames and used my router and table but I didn't use the fence and I think I was supposed to use it for support?

I used a Roman Ogee bit for the frame only made one pass and then cleaned up any high spots with a 2nd pass.

The frame came out fine, but felt odd to me to not use the fence.

I would never think of not using a fence on table saw, but this has me baffled

Thanks as always in advance
fence back from the bit a fuzz...
or..
no fence, use the starter pin...

.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Start with a starter pin.pdf (106.3 KB, 23 views)
Gaffboat and newbie2wood like this.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
Stick486 is online now  
post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 06:33 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Country: United States
First Name: Jessie
Posts: 136
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
fence back from the bit a fuzz...
or..
no fence, use the starter pin...

.
Thanks but I don't think my plate has a starter hole

I know it didn't come with a pin
newbie2wood is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 07:06 AM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 4,624
 
Default

Jessie, there seems to be something more fundamental.

If you have a bearing on the bit it will cut the profile and the bearing will ride on the portion of the profile that remains flat and fence is not necessary. If there is not a flat portion left for the bearing to ride on then a fence MUST be used to guide the work piece or the cutter will gouge it.

Keep in mind also that you should never place the work piece between the bit and the fence. The bit MUST always be between the fence and the work piece. The work piece MUST always be pushed from right to left and be on the OUTSIDE of the bit.

Using a fence is always safer even if the bit has a bearing on it. In this case you would adjust the bit depth into the fence so that the bearing is flat even with the edge(s) of the fence for a full profile, regardless of how many passes you make with increasing depth and cut until you get to the full profile.

If the work piece is irregular (curved) you would not use the fence, you would use a starter pin (google it) that is mounted on the table and the work piece would be started on the pin before making contact with the cutter. This stabilizes the work piece prior to making contact.

Is it safe to assume that your router is mounted in the table...?
kp91, rwl7532, thomas1389 and 8 others like this.

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Last edited by Nickp; 09-16-2020 at 07:09 AM.
Nickp is online now  
post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 07:54 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Country: United States
First Name: Jessie
Posts: 136
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
Jessie, there seems to be something more fundamental.

If you have a bearing on the bit it will cut the profile and the bearing will ride on the portion of the profile that remains flat and fence is not necessary. If there is not a flat portion left for the bearing to ride on then a fence MUST be used to guide the work piece or the cutter will gouge it.

Keep in mind also that you should never place the work piece between the bit and the fence. The bit MUST always be between the fence and the work piece. The work piece MUST always be pushed from right to left and be on the OUTSIDE of the bit.

Using a fence is always safer even if the bit has a bearing on it. In this case you would adjust the bit depth into the fence so that the bearing is flat even with the edge(s) of the fence for a full profile, regardless of how many passes you make with increasing depth and cut until you get to the full profile.

If the work piece is irregular (curved) you would not use the fence, you would use a starter pin (google it) that is mounted on the table and the work piece would be started on the pin before making contact with the cutter. This stabilizes the work piece prior to making contact.

Is it safe to assume that your router is mounted in the table...?
Ok that makes sense and very easy even for me to understand. Thanks a bunch for that @Nickp

I did look up the starter pin, but from what I can tell it looks like it's part of a plate.

My router is mounted to an acrylic plate and that is set into a cut out in the table.

This is my router table:

https://www.rockler.com/trim-router-table

The bit I used did have bearing also
kp91, DesertRatTom and Stick486 like this.
newbie2wood is offline  
post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 07:59 AM
Registered User
 
sreilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Country: United States
First Name: Steve
Posts: 1,641
 
Default

Just to be clear, can you post a picture of your portable router table w/fence? Nick's post is dead on but the starter pin is a support for the wood to guide on and the bearing keeps the wood a specified distance from the cutter. Raising or lowering the bit will change the cut but the distance bearing keeps the wood at a constant fixed distance. Raising or lowering the bit just changes the depth of cut. If for some odd reason you don't have a starter pin or a hole threaded for it you can always make one to use.
sreilly is offline  
post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 08:09 AM
Marine Engineer
 
kp91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Country: United States
First Name: Doug
Posts: 4,769
 
Default

If you don't have a starting pin, you can accomplish the same by clamping a narrow piece of wood to the table. The goal is to have a second point of contact to help you control the stock as you pivot onto the bearing.

It's a simple thing, but has saved many fingers.
JFPNCM, Nickp, Ed3443 and 2 others like this.

Doug
1 John 1:9
Fredericksburg, VA




http://disasterreliefeffort.org/
kp91 is offline  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 09:58 AM
Registered User
 
Nickp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Nick
Posts: 4,624
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie2wood View Post
Ok that makes sense and very easy even for me to understand. Thanks a bunch for that @Nickp

I did look up the starter pin, but from what I can tell it looks like it's part of a plate.

My router is mounted to an acrylic plate and that is set into a cut out in the table.

This is my router table:

https://www.rockler.com/trim-router-table

The bit I used did have bearing also


Yes...the starter pin is a post that is held in place in the plate...screwed into provided thread a few inches away from the bit and generally around the 4-5 o'clock position. With the fence well out of the way and the bit having a bearing, one can start to route the profile onto a work piece by first placing the piece against the starter pin and then pivot the piece into the bit. At that point you can move the piece away from the pin and continue the profile (if necessary or desired). Unless you are routing profiles on a curved piece of wood, you won't find a reason to use the pin...use the fence until you come to that point.

That you had a bearing AND a flat portion left on the work piece is what allowed you to not use the fence...
Herb Stoops and newbie2wood like this.

Nick

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
GIVE A MAN A FISH and you feed him for a day.
TEACH HIM HOW TO FISH and you feed him for his life time.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Nickp is online now  
post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 10:11 AM
Retired Moderator
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 16,385
 
Default

I still like using the fence even if I'm using a bearing guided bit for the cut. The fence makes starting and finishing the cut easier and a fence provides an extra element of safety that a starting pin doesn't since most of the bit is hidden behind the fence where your fingers can't come into contact with it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 09-16-2020, 10:34 AM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 15,458
 
Default

Another feature of the fence, even if your bit has a bearing, is that the fwnce allows you to cut less of the bit's profile depth than if you use the bearing only.
A good example might be a slot cutter bit. If you only wanted 1/2 the depth that the bit would cut using the bearing only, using the fence only allows you to cut any depth up to the maximum.
DaninVan is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome