Why differant diameter straight bits for edges? - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-27-2010, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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Default Why differant diameter straight bits for edges?

For routing an edge, is there a differance if I use a 3/8" or a 1/2" diameter bit?
Does size matter?
Do you worry about wobble or vibration, and thus, whether to use a 1/4" or 1/2" shank, more or less with a straight bit or with a profile bit?
It seems to me that a straight bit would be less susceptible to wobble.
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-27-2010, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by sofasurfer View Post
For routing an edge, is there a differance if I use a 3/8" or a 1/2" diameter bit?
Does size matter?
Do you worry about wobble or vibration, and thus, whether to use a 1/4" or 1/2" shank, more or less with a straight bit or with a profile bit?
It seems to me that a straight bit would be less susceptible to wobble.
I don't really know for sure. My own feeling is that the larger the bit, the smoother the finish because you are slicing the wood at a shallower angle.... Dunno for sure, my own reasoning and probably a flashback of some sort.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-28-2010, 12:04 AM
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A 1/2" shank is 4-times stronger and is "stiffer" than a 1/4" shank, so it has less wobble for a given sized cutter.

As for the better cutter diameter, I only have my own experience to draw upon, and that pales to many here but the larger bits seem to run cooler (for a given depth cut) than a small bit. I've wondered if it was because (even at the same RPM and with a shallow edge cut) the cutter moves further in the air, so experiences more (faster) room air. This is just my guess but I've noticed my 1/4" cutter bits seem to dull faster than my 1/2" cutter bits. Again, this is just my perception, and could be totally incorrect.

How about it guys... is it just my imagination? <g>

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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-28-2010, 12:07 AM Thread Starter
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the smoother the finish because you are slicing the wood at a shallower angle

I like that thought. Makes sense.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-28-2010, 02:46 AM
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Larger bits usually have the larger 1/2" shank. These can be used on tougher cuts as they resist bending & provide less vibration better than the 1/4" shank bits. My preference is the 1/2" shank bits over the 1/4" shank bits, but the smaller profile usually have a 1/4" shank. It's good to have a router that can handle both. Flush trim bits also come in different lengths as well as different spirals on the cutting edge. Straight cutting edge will give a shear cut as it hits the surface straight on. A spiraled cutting edge will slice the material.
The different sized flush-trim bits are for working in tight spots as well as the wide, open spaces.

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Last edited by jlord; 01-28-2010 at 11:10 AM.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-01-2010, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sofasurfer View Post
For routing an edge, is there a differance if I use a 3/8" or a 1/2" diameter bit?
Does size matter?
Do you worry about wobble or vibration, and thus, whether to use a 1/4" or 1/2" shank, more or less with a straight bit or with a profile bit?
It seems to me that a straight bit would be less susceptible to wobble.
The larger the diameter the smoother the edge finish

Also to improve the finish work with the plunge mode taking small cuts at each step.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 02-02-2010, 04:02 AM
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Bigger dia leads to a stiffer bit. less vibration, better quality of cut, all other things being equal.
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