Cutting a little at a time - Router Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 05-31-2010, 10:49 PM Thread Starter
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Default Cutting a little at a time

Hi,

I've seen a bit of information around, and read information, on not cutting too much at one time.

This makes a lot of sense to me, but something I've not come across has been regarding how to go about doing this with a table mounted router.

I understand the concept of taking off small amounts until you achieve the actual edge/depth you want, but I have one question remaining.

For this example specifically, I am using a bit used to make a simple rounded corner.

When slowly incrementing the cuts to avoid trying to take to much material at once, do you slowly raise the router with each pass, or do you move the fence? Or both?
Any particular reason as to why?

Thanks.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 05-31-2010, 11:36 PM
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What size roundover are you using? Most can be done in one single pass no problem.

James
Whittier, CA.

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 05-31-2010, 11:44 PM Thread Starter
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It is a 1/2" rounding bit, but I'm using it on 1/2" plywood (I'm guessing this is sacrilegious, but it's all I have to work with )
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-01-2010, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Neural View Post
Hi,

I've seen a bit of information around, and read information, on not cutting too much at one time.

This makes a lot of sense to me, but something I've not come across has been regarding how to go about doing this with a table mounted router.

I understand the concept of taking off small amounts until you achieve the actual edge/depth you want, but I have one question remaining.

For this example specifically, I am using a bit used to make a simple rounded corner.

When slowly incrementing the cuts to avoid trying to take to much material at once, do you slowly raise the router with each pass, or do you move the fence? Or both?
Any particular reason as to why?

Thanks.
Hi - Welcome to the forum
Most cases it can likely be done either way. Where possible, I like changing the bit height. For me and my setup that's a bit easier. Some bits however, require it be done one way or the other depending on the profile.
Hope this helps

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-01-2010, 02:22 PM
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The neat thing about routing (and this forum) is there's often several ways to accomplish the same thing.

I prefer to get the bit height set just the way I want it (on scrap) and then move the fence until it bottoms on the bearing. My thinking is/was that if I damage a piece I can readily duplicate the cut, up until I swap bits. I've been lucky enough so far not to need it though, so its shown me no value. YMMV!!

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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-01-2010, 04:29 PM
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The neat thing about routing (and this forum) is there's often several ways to accomplish the same thing.
Indeed. There is yet another way that avoids moving the fence or the router height altogether. Say you want to approach the final cut by adjusting the height. First set the bit height to the final value. Then put two sheets of 1/4" or whatever hardboard on your table with holes where the router bit is. Make your first cut, remove one sheet, make another cut, remove the second sheet, make the final cut. Similar approaches can be taken with the fence distance as the adjustable variable.

I think the benefit of this approach is that you don't have to mess with painstakingly adjusted fences or bit heights.

Best - MM
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-01-2010, 06:11 PM
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It is a 1/2" rounding bit, but I'm using it on 1/2" plywood (I'm guessing this is sacrilegious, but it's all I have to work with )
With a 1/2" roundover & 1/2" plywood you will have to rely on your router fence to guide the material as it would completely miss the bearing if your bit has one. I feel you can run this in 1 pass. A 1/2" roundover is not that much material to remove. If your bit has a bearing you can set the fence flush with the bearing & a straight edge.

The height will have the bottom edge of the roundover flush with the table top. If it makes you more comfortable you can do 2 passes. Just move the fence forward towards you to recess the bit a little behind the fence. Then you can use a straight edge to flush the final cut.

James
Whittier, CA.

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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-02-2010, 04:20 PM
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I would suggest that you use a smaller bit. 1/2 in on1/2 ply is a little large and you won't get much of a roundover I think you will be much happier with a 3/8 or a1/4 bit.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-02-2010, 04:31 PM Thread Starter
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With a 1/2" roundover & 1/2" plywood you will have to rely on your router fence to guide the material as it would completely miss the bearing if your bit has one. I feel you can run this in 1 pass. A 1/2" roundover is not that much material to remove. If your bit has a bearing you can set the fence flush with the bearing & a straight edge.

The height will have the bottom edge of the roundover flush with the table top. If it makes you more comfortable you can do 2 passes. Just move the fence forward towards you to recess the bit a little behind the fence. Then you can use a straight edge to flush the final cut.
Well, part of what lead me to this forum is the issues I ran into with making one pass.

The amount of material it is removing *appears* to not be very much, but on a test piece of plywood, going for one pass.. well.. it smelled interesting.

I ended up, for the pieces I needed, making about 4 passes on each, after each pass, I adjusted the fence about 1/8th inch.

It came out acceptable for what I needed. Again, for me, I do what I call "Caveman Carpentry". The objective is strength and functionality, and not necessarily good looking or efficient, but I do want to learn how to use the router for things like rounded corners and smoothing edges out. I'm also interested in learning how to do dovetail work.

By the way, thanks everyone for the help and advice.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 06-04-2010, 07:13 PM
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in a table mounted router and bit with a beiring on the top use a fence and use a brass bar or a large bit and move the fence over to where the beiring just rub's now that if the most cut that you can get But now when you rase the bit up you will get more profile and the round over will leve the little grove in the round over But the cut is all that you will get Now what you can do is not let the beiring get to the brass bar of bit so that it doesn't rub Now you will get less of a cut Now move it over and do another cut do this tell you get the brass bar or bit that rubs on the beiring This is the max of cut Hope this helps's been doing routers for yrs and table mounted and plung also have 5 routers and 3 router table's del

del schisler
port st. lucie, florida
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