Has any one seen a project to make a holder for large kitchen pan lids? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-18-2010, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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Default Has any one seen a project to make a holder for large kitchen pan lids?

My pan lids are way out of control. Just stacking them in an extra wire rack found that they hooked together and then when dropped caused spills.

I made a cradle for these with just a base of 12 in shelving with some dadoes and 6 or so dividers to separate the lids using other scraps.

Is there any finished designs for something like this? Lids are bigger and heavier than plates and such and I've seen all varieties of dish racks. Nor do I want something enclosed and over head.

I just wondered if there was some more elegant solution. My assembly is unfinished and will remain so. It will get wet etc when setting up the lids to dry.

For this job I had a bit that matched my scraps of knock together shelving and I used the MCLS 3 in One tool with a straight edge to cut the dadoes ending in a stop cut for the front edge.

I do not have a camera but it's not likely anyone wants to see this kluge anyway.

:-)
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-18-2010, 10:04 PM
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Yeah, lids are a pain! I'm not sure if I understand correctly what kind of wire rack you have, but anyway: could you use the wire rack as is and put the lids upright between the wires? Just a thought. We keep our pots and pans also on a wire rack (one of those industrial shelving units units), and we mostly keep the lids on the pans. We also hang some of our pans from the holes in their handles. We just thread the pan handles through the lid handles.

I guess, we are all looking forward to your providing the first plans for a top-notch pot-lid holding unit

Cheers - MM
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-18-2010, 10:24 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for answering.


Well I'll prob'ly use what I cobble together indefinitely. No place to hang or store. I live in an apt which is good size except for what is called a "galley kitchen". No room for anything. Not for one who cooks all meals in.


The lids flop around in the wire rack whose wires are not long enough to support a 12 or 14 in fryer lid. I've sorted through stuff and am only keeping ready access to pieces used all the time.

The divider idea works ok. I had some pieces with 2 in holes through the
centers which accommodated audio speaker ports (ports were on the outside.)
Cutting one of those in half with the half circle works well as a starting point for
a rest spot for the knobs on the lids. It was a happenstance that I had some pieces like that.
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 06:41 AM
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Hi Ioninappleton:

Ok, time to rethink your problem: firstly, how many pots and pans do you use on any given day:

1. saucepans, about three sizes
2. frying pans (maybe 2)

Ok, the footprint of the saucepans will be the same as the footprint for the lids. You could put a plywood carrier underneath your rack with cutouts to allow access to the handles and store the lids upside down in the carrier.

Your second tier of pans would be

1. specialty saucepans
2. oval fish pan
3. pancake griddle
4. varying sizes of frying pans

These could be relegated to the pantry section on a shelf of their own with the lids installed.

The ones that are a killer for me are

1. mixing bowls. I have some specific for breads, others for pastry, yet others for biscuits etc and then my wife likes making cakes and fruit upside down cakes which require different cooking vessels. My wok resides with my large steel bowls and pizza pans.
2. I have a rather large collection of pie plates (tin, steel, glass, etc.) I use them to freeze TV dinners and to makes pies and freeze them.
3. the real killers are the electric appliances. My mixers (2), food mill, quern, various grilling implements, deep fat fryer (but that's on the way to the garbage, I've found a new way to make chips ;-) ) blender, toaster, and those are the constant use ones.

So, maybe ideas to solve your problem might also help solve mine.


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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 09:35 AM Thread Starter
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While I know there are many storage solutions in the stores and specialty sites that feature these kinds of things, the impression I get is that they are designing them for someone else. Example: when I tried a search for this topic I got a overhead shelf behind a door with lids in dividers that could barely be seen. And on the wrong day, glass lids stored in such a fashion could fall directly on your big toe.

Also I've never seen any computer desk assemblies that weren't "trying to do too much." This means a place for everything and everything in it's place. In reality, all you need is a large flat surface that you can walk around with everything hanging out and easy to plug and unplug.

What I'm describing is things that are supposed to work but some consideration was left out-- like my big toe. :-)

I can't picture your over under arrangement. Will go back and go through it again.

What I had before was simply I pile of lids any which way in the wire rack-- not propped up or anything. What forced me to make a change was looking for a way to have the knobs back to back so that they wouldn't catch on each other during a quick grab during cooking.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 11:07 AM
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Hi Lon,

When we bought Mom a new set of pans, she had the same issue. After WAY too much thought and discussion I just made this simple frame from some scrap 1/2" stock. I measured each lid for diameter and then sized segments of the frame to fit. There is no bottom, just butt jointed with glue and pins, and the whole thing slides out to reach the back lids. It's lasted several years.

Just an idea for this thread.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
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dermer2002,



That addresses the handle problem until you reverse a couple. Plus mine are all round, hence the cutout in the middle of each divider to keep them from wandering about. And the handles/knobs are different sizes as well. The lids also vary widely in depth. The biggest one I use as a way to freshen buns with steam: fry pan with water, splatter screen and then the deep lid over the bread.


But yes, this way with just a box will separate things about the way my dividers do.
How does your mom clean the inside bottom? ;-)

Plus I have randomly spaced the slots to provide for some adjustments for needed, not needed items.

Your pictures illustrate what is needed the way my descriptions cannot. Thanks for posting them.

Today I'm getting a bit closer. I made a tall splatter guard for the left hand edge to protect the fridge from lid nicks. I think the dividers will need some adjustment for width of the lids. Max lid size is 12 inches-- even the one I thought was 14 in. and appears huge in use. And some are glass and some are metal.

Sitting on a counter top the open style feels more right.

A question I have is rounding edges. I have only seen one bit that could round over both faces. And how could it follow a curve without a pattern? Patterns mean using things like band saws which I don't have.

I could start the "if only" game and speculate on redoing everything right away. But I think what's needed is to whack the thing together and use it for a while to find out what works. No glue on anything so as to disassemble easily. The pieces are really rough because I am recycling old projects: glue up shelving, press board with laminate from flat pack screw together lamp stands. Rubbish in other words.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 04:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loninappleton View Post
The biggest one I use as a way to freshen buns with steam: fry pan with water, splatter screen and then the deep lid over the bread.
Nuts, I've been using a bamboo steamer and an extra pot. Thanks for the tip.

Quote:
A question I have is rounding edges. I have only seen one bit that could round over both faces. And how could it follow a curve without a pattern? Patterns mean using things like band saws which I don't have.
Actually, use your router to make the pattern. Dig around the forum. There's a tutorial somewhere on making templates.

Quote:
I could start the "if only" game and speculate on redoing everything right away. But I think what's needed is to whack the thing together and use it for a while to find out what works. No glue on anything so as to disassemble easily. The pieces are really rough because I am recycling old projects: glue up shelving, press board with laminate from flat pack screw together lamp stands. Rubbish in other words.
That's exactly what you want for experimentation. Now, please document the progression of experiments for us. This is useful stuff.

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-19-2010, 05:16 PM Thread Starter
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I have to make my brag about the steaming technique. I submitted it to Cooks Illustrated and they printed it and sent me a two year subscription. The deal with tips at cooking mags is the simpler the better.

Same chicken fryer makes my spaghetti and the bread goes on the top last.
I do not have many tools or fine cooking gear either.

I will give an update soon.

As to all the sorts of lids, most come with metal tops with vents and other gizmos to sell to first time cookery buyers in those big sets. Over time I've sought out glass lids at the thrift because you can see when something is coming to a boil etc.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-21-2010, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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An update so long as there is interest.


Coming from speaker building I have lots of pieces with holes in them and hole cutters as well.


For this rack I have made some progress. The notched dividers by themselves in a flat base (the only element where routing was involved) still allowed for too much play. What I made was a built up notch so that the bowl of the lid fit upright and the lid handle would not protrude into the next compartment. I did this by using a hole saw in a square piece. I then cut that in half and glued the two halves together and then glued that to the original notch. This seems to work well for the larger cumbersome lids. Picturing this notch might remind one of those half round racks that wine bottles sit in.

As the lids get smaller and knobs have less depth, I can decrease or eliminate
this built up tweak. Making the dividers to size for specific lids seems unavoidable. That or minimum flexibility between slots because of all the
different styles of manufacture.

One routing question though. My dadoed slots are pretty tight. I wondered if there are any other methods of slightly widening those than by putting a length of tape on the straight edge used to create the dadoes. I would align the bit in the present dado tight to the straight edge fence. Then tape the fence and make another pass thereby shaving off just a fraction. This is the equivalent of the "dollar bill trick" that Gary Rugowski shows in his router videos.
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