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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-29-2004, 10:57 PM Thread Starter
 
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Default hole saw cut-outs

I use a hole saw to cut out 2" holes out of 3/4" cedar boards, what is the safest to trim the 2" round plugs edges with a round over- bit, I use a table mounted router. The plugs are used for wheels on wood toys, I need all the help I can get, the toys are given to the childern homes for battered and forgotten kids.

thanks, pablino
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-30-2004, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pablino
I use a hole saw to cut out 2" holes out of 3/4" cedar boards, what is the safest to trim the 2" round plugs edges with a round over- bit, I use a table mounted router. The plugs are used for wheels on wood toys, I need all the help I can get, the toys are given to the childern homes for battered and forgotten kids.

thanks, pablino
This is a good question. First I'm glad you ask here because someone will have an answer. I just want you to know that working that close to a router bit is not something I do, and I would never never advise trying to do this with a guide pin and hand turning the piece. Think DANGER DANGER....

Now having said that, I know this is a forum about router and router can do anything etc etc but I think I would think about a sanding operation. You will be doing a lot of cross-grain operations with the router and the results may require sanding to look right anyway.

Now having said that unless you really like making the wheels or the wood is free or something like that I might just purchase them. Hardwood (birch) wheels 2" dia. pkg of 100 is $30. This is just out of a catalog I have setting here my my computer so if you shop around?????

That's my 2-cents,

Ed

PS Thank you for your work with the kids, that is great!
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-30-2004, 04:10 AM
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There is a way that I have been told that involves making a v-notch in a piece of MDF (or something similar) with a clearance hole for the bit to poke through. This then gets clamped to the table in such a way that the open end of the v is facing you and the bit is clear of the clearance hole. This then means you can push the wheel into the v and it contacts the edges of the v and the bit at the same time - increasing the safety margin. Having said all of that I don't know if I would try it with something that small though. You could also thread it onto a bolt and use the drill press to spin it while you sand the roundover onto each piece.
Good luck
Aaron

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-30-2004, 06:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spacemanspiff
There is a way that I have been told that involves making a v-notch in a piece of MDF (or something similar) with a clearance hole for the bit to poke through. This then gets clamped to the table in such a way that the open end of the v is facing you and the bit is clear of the clearance hole. This then means you can push the wheel into the v and it contacts the edges of the v and the bit at the same time - increasing the safety margin. Having said all of that I don't know if I would try it with something that small though. You could also thread it onto a bolt and use the drill press to spin it while you sand the roundover onto each piece.
Good luck
Aaron
Aaron has the way to do it...Cutting a lot of these wheels will make this operation boring and dangerous. We need to keep your fingers safe.

I am going to make the fence over the weekend to try the operation and post it Monday...

Rick and Bob
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Last edited by BobandRick; 09-30-2004 at 06:41 PM.
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 09-30-2004, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
 
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1-truck uses 6 ea wheels, 1- train uses 6ea, 1-car uses 4ea, 1 plane uses 2ea , I have delivered approx. 200 variety of the above toys in the last 6 months, i've been using a 1 in. belt sander, thanks for any speedy way of sanding the edges, my fingers are nearing 70 years. I enjoy every minute it. Pablino
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-02-2004, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pablino
I use a hole saw to cut out 2" holes out of 3/4" cedar boards, what is the safest to trim the 2" round plugs edges with a round over- bit, I use a table mounted router. The plugs are used for wheels on wood toys, I need all the help I can get, the toys are given to the childern homes for battered and forgotten kids.

thanks, pablino
1) I tried and found that the best way for me to do the operation was to make a vfence. (see attachment 1.)

2) This fence has a guard on top of the router bit and is 1" thick or 1/4" thicker than the wheel material. (see attachment 2)

3) The fence has three points of contact on the wheel while its being rounded over. (see attachment 3,4 and 5)

4) You should always start rounding over the wheel with the grain. Check all wheels for cracked or checked material before routing. Only use solid material for the wheels. (see attachment 6)

5) I used a pencil to control the wheel and then pushed the wheel into the router bit with my thumb. Always move the wheel against the rotation of the roundover bit and remember to keep you fingers and thumbs away from the router bit at all times. (See attachment 7)

Good luck and remember to keep your fingers safe at all times.
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Rick and Bob
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-09-2004, 01:16 PM
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Fabulous stuff, Rick and Bob!
Thanks
~Julie~
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-09-2004, 09:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pablino
I use a hole saw to cut out 2" holes out of 3/4" cedar boards, what is the safest to trim the 2" round plugs edges with a round over- bit, I use a table mounted router. The plugs are used for wheels on wood toys, I need all the help I can get, the toys are given to the childern homes for battered and forgotten kids.

thanks, pablino
Before I head over East

Looking for an alternative method that is safe.

1. You can first cut the shapes with your hole saw if you wish making them a little larger than you require or simply cut small squares.

2. Drill a hole centrally in the square blocks

3. Drill a smaller plug that can be attached to the square block and also to a sacrificial board. This is done with a countersunk metal threaded screw which will hold the material secure. Calculations are required as to what guide and cutter is to be used.calculations are required as to what guide and cutter is to be used Sorry about the double dipping

4. With an extended rounding over cutter it is possible to rout the shape and apply the rounding over required. Router is used on the plunge mode. Make a simple router support or use a set of skis to support the router

5. The wheel can now be returned over and the rounding over can be repeated. A little extra work in preparation but it will beTotally Safe I may have to supply some drawings if you cannot follow the method described but I will be away for a few days and not at the computer in that time.
Tom
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2004, 08:41 AM
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I think either Rockler or Lee Valley has a drillpress cutter for doing wheels, similar to a Rosette Cutter. Now given that, I have rounded over some wheel edges on wheels as small as 1 1/4". I have a small handheld jig I made. It's about 8" long, about 1" wide and out of 3/4" ply. It has a dowel in one end, less than the centerline of the wheel. Theres another dowl about 2" away with a wooden lever on it. Put the wheel on the outer wheel, there's a small stick on the other that works as a brake. Put that down on the table and carefully work it into the bit. The bit will try and turn the wheel, thats where the other stick is pressed against the wheel to slow it down so it cuts an even edge.

Hope that helps. Good luck/
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 10-10-2004, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by hcbph
I think either Rockler or Lee Valley has a drillpress cutter for doing wheels, similar to a Rosette Cutter. Now given that, I have rounded over some wheel edges on wheels as small as 1 1/4". I have a small handheld jig I made. It's about 8" long, about 1" wide and out of 3/4" ply. It has a dowel in one end, less than the centerline of the wheel. Theres another dowl about 2" away with a wooden lever on it. Put the wheel on the outer wheel, there's a small stick on the other that works as a brake. Put that down on the table and carefully work it into the bit. The bit will try and turn the wheel, thats where the other stick is pressed against the wheel to slow it down so it cuts an even edge.

Hope that helps. Good luck/

Sounsd interesting ... any chance of a picture of it?

Thanks
Aaron

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