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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 08:43 AM Thread Starter
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Default Using round-over bits

Hi folks--

Have a question for the site. I'm building a deck, and wish to use a round-over bit to trim the outer edge of the fascia board for the edge of the deck. I've purchased a set of Skil roundover bits (1/4, 3/8, & 1/2 inch, with axial bearings). I'm going to wind up with approx. 100 ft of fascia, and would like the final edge to be the 1/2" round.

I was taught that routing is done a bit at a time--I do a lot of dovetail work and Japanese notch construction--but I've never used a roundover bit.

My tendency is--as I'll be using a hand router--to use the 1/4" bit, then the 3/8" bit, and finish with the 1/2" bit.

Thus, the question: Is this the way to approach the problem? Would multiple passes introduce inconsistency in the work, or would it be better to just use a single bit (the 1/2") slowly and carefully? (This is treated lumber.) Either way, I'm going to look like a cinnamon donut when I'm finished.

Any suggestions would be appreciated! Thanks!

Steve
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 09:14 AM
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Test it on some scrap lumber. Rather than changing bits, I would start out with the bit low in the router and adjust the height after each pass until the desired results are produced.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 09:22 AM
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Hi Steve

I would suggest one bit and make a pass or two,the treated lumber likes to split out easy so I would suggest using the pocket type way, that's to say go into the stock every 6" or so to stop the splits, than go over the pocket to clean it up..on the 1st pass , the 2nd pass will give you a nice clean job..I will say don't go to slow or you will get burn marks...let the bit do it's job like it was made to do...

I should note ,,,keep you dust mask on all the time, that stuff is nasty stuff, it's treated to keep the bugs away..and you too if you take it in..

=======

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve740 View Post
Hi folks--

Have a question for the site. I'm building a deck, and wish to use a round-over bit to trim the outer edge of the fascia board for the edge of the deck. I've purchased a set of Skil roundover bits (1/4, 3/8, & 1/2 inch, with axial bearings). I'm going to wind up with approx. 100 ft of fascia, and would like the final edge to be the 1/2" round.

I was taught that routing is done a bit at a time--I do a lot of dovetail work and Japanese notch construction--but I've never used a roundover bit.

My tendency is--as I'll be using a hand router--to use the 1/4" bit, then the 3/8" bit, and finish with the 1/2" bit.

Thus, the question: Is this the way to approach the problem? Would multiple passes introduce inconsistency in the work, or would it be better to just use a single bit (the 1/2") slowly and carefully? (This is treated lumber.) Either way, I'm going to look like a cinnamon donut when I'm finished.

Any suggestions would be appreciated! Thanks!

Steve



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Last edited by bobj3; 08-26-2010 at 06:44 PM.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 09:44 AM Thread Starter
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Thumbs up Re: round-over bits

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Originally Posted by bobj3 View Post
Hi Steve

I would suggest one bit and make a pass or two,the treated lumber likes to split out easy so I would suggest using the pocket type way, that's to say go into the stock every 6" or so to stop the splits, than go over the pocket to clean it up..on the 1st pass , the 2nd pass will give you a nice clean job..I will say don't go to slow or you will get burn marks...let the bit do it's job like it was made to do...



=======
Bob--

Bingo--great idea about the pockets. I was concerned about the splitting. Starting high and dropping the same bit--the normal approach to routing--didn't occur to me with three brand new bits.

Thank you, sir!

Steve
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 10:19 AM
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HI Steve - Welcome to the forum
Looks like the guys have you fixed up. Just one tip, especially with treated lumber, have some bit cleaner on hand for when you are finished. Your bits will love you for it

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 05:42 PM Thread Starter
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Default John--Bit Cleaner?

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Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
HI Steve - Welcome to the forum
Looks like the guys have you fixed up. Just one tip, especially with treated lumber, have some bit cleaner on hand for when you are finished. Your bits will love you for it
John-- what type of bit cleaner? I've never used a two part--three, if you include the axial bearing and the allen (hex) nut--router bit before. Are we thinking a nice WD-40 bath (and not a shower?). I have no idea about the care of multiple part bits!

Thanks--Steve
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve740 View Post
John-- what type of bit cleaner? I've never used a two part--three, if you include the axial bearing and the allen (hex) nut--router bit before. Are we thinking a nice WD-40 bath (and not a shower?). I have no idea about the care of multiple part bits!

Thanks--Steve
HI Steve - If you get it while it's fresh, most heavy duty household cleaners will work, 409, Fantastic, etc. Several places have their own concoctions for cleaning and soaking badly caked bits and blades. I have stuff from CMT and Rockler. I haven't been giving the bearings any special treatment. Since most of the cleaners are water based I will hit them with a spritz of WD-40 before I put them back to bed though. Good bit care isn't difficult. When I take one out of the router I just squirt it with a bit of cleaner, wipe it off with a towel and check it for damage and such, spritz it with WD-40 and put it back. Only takes a few seconds and they are always ready to go. Usually more ready than I am

John Schaben

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 06:27 PM
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Hi Steve

I can't think of a quicker way to wipe out a nice router bit than to clean it the wrong way , the bearings are the sealed type but most cleaners (like WD40) will get in the bearing and break down the lube inside of it. you just want to clean the cutters and wipe the dust off the bearing, pick up some bit cleaner it's cheap and worth the money to do it right..a little spray and the pitch will wipe right off..and make it like new again..


======

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve740 View Post
John-- what type of bit cleaner? I've never used a two part--three, if you include the axial bearing and the allen (hex) nut--router bit before. Are we thinking a nice WD-40 bath (and not a shower?). I have no idea about the care of multiple part bits!

Thanks--Steve



"It's fine to disagree with other members as long as you respect their opinions"

Marc Sommerfeld Tools ,Videos
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT-n...RWaEpMA/videos

Find all threads started by bobj3
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobj3 View Post
Hi Steve

I can't think of a quicker way to wipe out a nice router bit than to clean it the wrong way , the bearings are the sealed type but most cleaners (like WD40) will get in the bearing and break down the lube inside of it. you just want to clean the cutters and wipe the dust off the bearing, pick up some bit cleaner it's cheap and worth the money to do it right..a little spray and the pitch will wipe right off..and make it like new again..


======
Hi Bob, I stand corrected. I read in Bill Hyltons book WoodWorking with the Router to use WD-40 on the bits. I just went back and checked and he did, but I took it totally out of context. He was using it to prevent contact cement buildup on the bearings during a job, not as a routine. Looks like I'm gonna need to change my program some.

John Schaben

The problem with experience is I usually get it immediately after I need it.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-26-2010, 08:32 PM
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While the bearings on the router bits are the sealed type, it just means they have a dust shield that just keeps out most of the dirt. Dirt still finds a way to get past this & they can be lubricated. They sell a bearing lube just for this purpose. Here's a few links to some products I found on the Google for lubricating these types of bearings found on router bits. I have used some of these to get a bearing that feels a little sluggish to spin freely again.

Lubes
Bearing Lubricant - Rockler Woodworking Tools

MLCS Woodworking Accesories

Router Accessories

James
Whittier, CA.

Have a nice & safe day!

Last edited by jlord; 08-26-2010 at 08:35 PM.
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