Plenty o' tenons to cut...which method? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-05-2011, 05:28 AM Thread Starter
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Question Plenty o' tenons to cut...which method?

Hi

I'm making a dining table that has an unusual trestle under frame, meaning there are lots of tenons to be cut. There are 6 tenons per trestle, and 2 trestles - plus the tenons (possibly two tenons per rail end) on the rails that join the rails to the trestles. So there will be about 20 tenons all up - probably all the same size.

I'm trying to decide whether to make a jig, do them on the router table, or cutting them 'manually' with a fence on a handheld router. Any advice would be much appreciated. The tenons will probably be about 34mm x 44mm, and about 44mm long.

I've done the 'manually' method before (for my workbench) and it worked well. The jig I've seen holds the stock vertically, and provides a platform on top which the router runs on, and is guided by either a collar guide (in the aperture on the top of the platform) or using a bearing guided bit on the stock itself.

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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-05-2011, 05:47 AM
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I knocked up a quick and dirty Horizontal Router Table




As you can Tenons are a breeze.
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-05-2011, 06:14 AM
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I find just doing mortices on both pieces and then using loose tenons to be a good fast method.
Titus's method looks good too.
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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-05-2011, 09:12 AM
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I've been helping a neighbor friend build a two-level workbench with mortice/tenon joinery. We used my Powermatic morticing machine to cut the (large) mortices, and then a combination of table saw and bandsaw to cut the tenons. We cut the shoulders of the tenons on the TS, using a stop block to establish the distance of the cut from the ends of the boards. For shorter pieces, we then used my old Delta tenoning jig on the TS to make the cheek cuts. For longer pieces, we used his bandsaw.

The trick is to keep the "reference surface" in mind when doing the cuts. That is, the surface from which all measurements are based.

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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-05-2011, 02:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice so far. I did consider making a quick horizontal router table but was concerned re holding my heavy router (a 3612C) horizontally - whether that be in the mounting plate, or attached directly to a vertical plate. Any idea re this? My mounting plate is a Bench Dog aluminium pro plate at 3/8" so it's a solid unit...but horizontally?? I guess I could support the router body to reduce the leverage it can exert on the plate.

I don't have a TS, nor a BS - otherwise that'd be a good option.
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-06-2011, 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted by matt1710 View Post
I guess I could support the router body to reduce the leverage it can exert on the plate.
That's how I'd do it if I was fitting a heavy router, a piece of 19mm mdf cut to suit the shape of the router.

My HRT cost less than 10 so it's a cheap option.

The 8mm spiral up-cut HSS bit cost a bit more mind

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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-06-2011, 05:08 AM Thread Starter
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If I am to go with a HRT, would it be advisable to use my existing mounting plate - and cut a recess just like I did with the RT - or ditch the mounting plate and attach the router directly to the vertical member of the HRT?
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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-06-2011, 06:07 AM
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I went with a new "plate" which is the vertical part of the HRT - it was cheap.

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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-06-2011, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt1710 View Post
Thanks for the advice so far. I did consider making a quick horizontal router table but was concerned re holding my heavy router (a 3612C) horizontally - whether that be in the mounting plate, or attached directly to a vertical plate. Any idea re this? My mounting plate is a Bench Dog aluminium pro plate at 3/8" so it's a solid unit...but horizontally?? I guess I could support the router body to reduce the leverage it can exert on the plate.

I don't have a TS, nor a BS - otherwise that'd be a good option.
you could probably just use a scissors jack if you need something to support the weight of the router
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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-06-2011, 07:48 AM
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you could probably just use a scissors jack if you need something to support the weight of the router
Good idea and cheap too!

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